Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1964) - News Poster

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Yvonne Craig Embraces Her Batgirl Legacy in a Recovered Interview (Exclusive)

Less than a year before her passing in 2015, actress Yvonne Craig was chatting with me about the enduring nature of the 1960s Batman series that starred Adam West in the title role, Burt Ward as his sidekick, Robin; and Yvonne herself in the dual role of Barbara Gordon and Batgirl. The complete series had been issued on Blu-ray at the time, which explained the excitement of the moment, but not the fact that people still loved that show nearly 50 years after its debut. “Part of it is that it is that it's a sign of our times,” she said. “Everyone would like to go back to the time of ‘Flower Power.’ You know, rather than blowing people up in all these different places like they are in the world, people are looking for an escape. And this is not only an escape, but it’s stilly and fun and filled with pretty colors.
See full article at Closer Weekly »

What’s Leaving Netflix in February 2018

Netflix will cycle out multiple series throughout February, including “Family Guy,” the first season of Shonda Rhimes’s “The Catch,” and Seasons 1 through 7 of “Burn Notice.”

Hannibal Buress’s comedy specials “Animal Furnace” and “Live from Chicago, as well as Aziz Ansari’s “Dangerously Delicious” will also exit the streaming platform.

Since the holiday season is officially over, “The Nightmare Before Christmas” will no longer be available to stream. Other films leaving Netflix include “The Benchwarmers,” “The Fury,” “Perfect Stranger,” and “Jane Got a Gun.”

Check out the full list of titles leaving Netflix below:

Leaving Feb. 1

The Benchwarmers

Brubaker

Corpse Bride

Day Watch

Desk Set

Enquiring Minds

Everyone’s Hero

The Five Heartbeats

The Fury

Hard Candy

How to Steal a Million

King Arthur

The Longest Day

Magic City: Season 1-2

The Nightmare Before Christmas

Night Watch

Open Season: Scared Silly

Perfect Stranger

Project X

Silver Streak

Stranger by the Lake

Tin Man

Top Gear: Series
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Robert Dowdell, Actor on 'Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,' Dies at 85

Robert Dowdell, the versatile actor who had supporting roles on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Stoney Burke, two ABC series of the 1960s, has died. He was 85.

Dowdell died Tuesday of natural causes in Coldwater, Michigan, family spokeswoman Diane Kachmar told The Hollywood Reporter.  

On 109 episodes of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea from 1964-68, Dowdell portrayed Chip Morton, the lieutenant commander on the submarine Seaview under the command of Adm. Harriman Nelson (Richard Basehart). The series was created by Irwin Allen, based on his 1961 movie...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Robert Dowdell, Actor on 'Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,' Dies at 85

Robert Dowdell, Actor on 'Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,' Dies at 85
Robert Dowdell, the versatile actor who had supporting roles on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Stoney Burke, two ABC series of the 1960s, has died. He was 85.

Dowdell died Tuesday of natural causes in Coldwater, Michigan, family spokeswoman Diane Kachmar told The Hollywood Reporter.  

On 109 episodes of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea from 1964-68, Dowdell portrayed Chip Morton, the lieutenant commander on the submarine Seaview under the command of Adm. Harriman Nelson (Richard Basehart). The series was created by Irwin Allen, based on his 1961 movie...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Joseph Gantman, Emmy-Winning Producer on 'Mission: Impossible,' Dies at 95

Joseph Gantman, who won the outstanding drama series Emmy Award in consecutive years for producing Mission: Impossible, has died. He was 95.

Gantman died Dec. 26 in Santa Monica, his daughter Nina confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter.

Gantman also produced episodes of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (the 1964 pilot), Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Young Dr. Kildare, Movin' On — a series about big-rig truckers that starred Claude Akins — and The Dukes of Hazzard.

He produced all but one of the 53 episodes of CBS' Mission: Impossible during its first two seasons, after which it was named...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

"Lost In Space: The Complete John Williams Collection" On Vinyl

  • CinemaRetro
By Darren Allison

Before inheriting the title "Master of Disaster", a perfectly justified honour for his reputation of creating some of the greatest disaster movies of the 1970s, Irwin Allen was also the man responsible for some of the classic TV shows to emerge in the 1960’s. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Time Tunnel, and Land of the Giants have all survived the test of time and become immortalised among the best in terms of cultural importance. However, above all others, Lost in Space (1965-1968) is arguably the series that endured. Very loosely inspired by Johan David Wyss's classic 1812 adventure novel “Swiss Family Robinson”, the premise for the show was fairly uncomplicated and followed the adventures of the Robinson family, a crew of space colonists who encounter a number of strange and otherworldly situations after their ship is sabotaged and thrown off its original course. A great
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Ed Catto: One Man’s Treasure

  • Comicmix
You know the old saying: One’s man’s trash is another man’s treasure. That applies to me and my pals so often.

Now, I realize I’m very blessed: I have a great bunch of friends. I share interests and/or a long history with each them. I guess that’s part of the definition of a friend. But we don’t all love the same stuff. And when it comes to Geek Culture, a bunch of my friends just aren’t that into it.

I pity those fools as I flip through the latest PaperGirls.

Freddie P is that type of friend. He’s a long-time pal. We grew up in the same small town, kept in touch through college and lived near another in those wild just-a-few-years-outta-college days. After that, we always stayed in touch. We’ve watched each other’s families grow up. We laughed
See full article at Comicmix »

Krakatoa East of Java

‘Things Blowing Up Good’ has been surefire entertainment since the beginning of cinema, but this ill-fated Cinerama extravaganza about the biggest explosion in recorded human history limps along despite some pretty darned impressive volcanic effects. It’s quite an entertaining spectacle, with various good performers in three soap opera plots, either overacting or loitering about with nothing to do. And don’t forget the from-left-field musical striptease.

Krakatoa East of Java

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 131 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Maximilian Schell, Diane Baker, Brian Keith, Barbara Werle, Sal Mineo, Rossano Brazzi, John Leyton, J.D. Cannon, Jacqueline (Jacqui) Chan, Victoria Young, Marc Lawrence, Geoffrey Holder, Niall MacGinnis, Sumi Haru.

Cinematography: Manuel Berenguer

Film Editors: Walter Hannemann, Warren Low, Maurice Rootes

Production Design: Eugèné Lourié

Costumes: Laure Lourié

Special Effects: Eugèné Lourié, Alex Weldon, Francisco Prósper

Original Music: Frank De Vol

Written by Clifford Newton Gould,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

TCM goes to war on Memorial Day: But thorny issues mostly avoided

Submarine movie evening: Underwater war waged in TCM's Memorial Day films In the U.S., Turner Classic Movies has gone all red, white, and blue this 2017 Memorial Day weekend, presenting a few dozen Hollywood movies set during some of the numerous wars in which the U.S. has been involved around the globe during the last century or so. On Memorial Day proper, TCM is offering a submarine movie evening. More on that further below. But first it's good to remember that although war has, to put it mildly, serious consequences for all involved, it can be particularly brutal on civilians – whether male or female; young or old; saintly or devilish; no matter the nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other label used in order to, figuratively or literally, split apart human beings. Just this past Sunday, the Pentagon chief announced that civilian deaths should be anticipated as “a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Exclusive Portraits, Audio: Ed Asner, TV Icon & Character Actor

Chicago – When Mary Tyler Moore passed away in January, it was another reminder of her groundbreaking 1970s TV series “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” One of her co-stars – who portrayed bossman Lou Grant, and made his own mark in TV and movies thereafter – was Ed Asner. The actor appeared at “The Hollywood Show.”

Ed Asner at The Hollywood Show in March of 2017

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Edward Asner was born in Kansas City, Missouri. He began his acting career in the Army, touring in plays while in the Signal Corp. He attended the University of Chicago, and joined an early version of The Second City troupe, the Playwrights Theatre Company of Chicago (Asner is considered a Second City alumni). He was a consummate character actor in the 1960s, appearing in such diverse series as “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Route 66,” “The Untouchables,” “The Outer Limits,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Cinema’s Top Underwater Thrillers

The new aquatic adventure film The Chamber – where a submarine mission goes badly wrong – is the epitome of an underwater thriller. It plunges you into the action and makes you feel as if you’re right there with the crew fighting amongst each other, and fighting for their lives, sinking into the depths of the Yellow Sea. Here are eight more deep sea chillers that’ll have you struggling for breath.

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961)

“Race from outer space to seven miles below the sea … with amazing aquanauts of the deep!” In this classic sci-fi adventure Walter Pidgeon is in charge of a nuclear submarine whose very mission is to save the planet Earth. Directed by Irwin Allen, who went on to make disaster movies like The Poseidon Adventure and The Swarm, the film features the sub being attacked by a giant octopus, which should be recommendation enough.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Chandu the Magician

Hissable villain Bela Lugosi is in denial --- no, it's actually star Edmund Lowe who is in the Nile, deep-sixed in a sunken sarcophagus. Lugosi's up top trying to get his art deco death ray in running order -- opposed only by some nubile babes and a Great White Hypnotist from the Swami school of mind control. Chandu the Magician Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1932 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 71 min. / Street Date August 23, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Edmund Lowe, Irene Ware, Bela Lugosi, Herbert Mundin, Henry B. Walthall, Weldon Heyburn, June Lang, Michael Stuart, Virginia Hammond. Cinematography James Wong Howe Art Direction Max Parker Written by Barry Conners, Philip Klein, Guy Bolton, Bradley King, Harry Segall from a radio drama by Harry A. Earnshaw, Vera M. Oldham, R.R. Morgan Directed by William Cameron Menzies, Marcel Varnel

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Around 2008 Fox Home Video made a last big push with genre releases on DVD,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Silk Stockings

It's in glorious Technicolor Metrocolor, CinemaScope and StereoPhonic Sound! Fred Astaire's final MGM musical gives him Cyd Charisse and a Cole Porter score, plus some nice Hermes Pan choreography. The script and Rouben Mamoulian's direction aren't the best, but the combined magic of the musical and dancing talent saves the day. Silk Stockings Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1957 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 117 min. / Street Date July 12, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Janis Paige, Peter Lorre, George Tobias, Jules Munshin, Joseph Buloff, Wim Sonneveld Cinematography Robert Bronner Art Direction Randall Duell, William A. Horning Film Editor Harold F. Kress Original Music Cole Porter Written by Abe Burrows, Leonard Gershe, George S. Kaufman, Leueen MacGrath, and Leonard Spigelgass Produced by Arthur Freed Directed by Rouben Mamoulian

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

On the Town?  The Pajama Game?  Damn Yankees?   The Warner Archive Collection's next musical up for the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

25 years ago today: ‘Boyz n the Hood’ opened in theaters

  • Hitfix
25 years ago today: ‘Boyz n the Hood’ opened in theaters
Boyz n the Hood was a history-maker. It made John Singleton the youngest person ever nominated for a Best Director Oscar and the first African-American honored in the category. If those celebrating that landmark had gotten a peek into America 25 years after Boyz n the Hood’s release, they’d probably be rather disappointed — probably some mix of horrified and furious too. As Black Lives Matter protests make headlines following the deaths of Philander Castile and Alton Sterling, and as the Academy recovers from a season marked by the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite (though, on the other hand, Broadway got #TonysSoBlack trending), today marks a quarter century since Boyz n the Hood opened in theaters. Though the 1992 Oscar nominations announcement came with the notable milestone for Singleton, the release of the movie in July 1991 was marked by tragedy: Despite the film’s concluding words, “Increase the Peace,” the movie’s opening weekend
See full article at Hitfix »

Forbidden Planet: The Film that Inspired Star Trek Turns 60

  • Cinelinx
While there’s been a lot of attention paid to the fact that this year is the 50th anniversary of Star Trek, not a lot is being been said about a movie that came out 10 years before which inspired the series. In honor of its 60thanniversary, Cinelinx looks at the sci-fi classic Forbidden Planet.

Star Trek is one of the most popular and enduring sci-fi franchises ever made. If it wasn’t for the influential 1956 film Forbidden Planet, we might never have had Star Trek. If you examine Forbidden Planet closely, you’ll see the creative aspects that inspired Gene Roddenberry while he was creating his TV masterpiece, which debuted in 1966. According to ‘Star Trek Fact Check’, Gene Roddenberry once wrote a letter asking “Would it be ethical to get a print of the film and have our people make stills from some of the appropriate frames?”

Forbidden Planet—which
See full article at Cinelinx »

Ed Catto: Time Won’t Let Me

When I applied to University of North Carolina (Unc) Graduate School of Business to earn my Mba, one of the application’s essay questions asked “If you were go back into time to the founding of this university, what three items would you bring with you?”

I imagine the purpose of this was to discern candidates’ true character based on which items were most important to them. I bet there were a lot of answers that listed items like family photos or the Bible. I took a different approach. Having grown up on a steady diet of time travel comics and stories (most notably Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court) I interpreted the question in a different way. I answered it by thinking about the three items that would have the greatest positive impact on history. One item I recall bringing back in time (in
See full article at Comicmix »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Fly

  • Cinelinx
It’s a new year but we’re still looking at remakes and what makes them good or bad. For our latest article, we’ve got one of the good ones as we break down David Cronenberg’s The Fly.

It’s often the case where the original film is clearly better than the remake, or sometimes vice-versa. In this case, however, it’s actually hard to determine which of them is better because they’re both so well done. Both were financially successful and well-reviewed. Both versions inspired sequels. For horror fans, both versions of this film are worth a viewing. Additionally, they both had great poster catchphrases. The 1958 version had, “He was once human!” and the remake had the even more memorable “Be afraid! Be very afraid!”

The original version of The Fly (1958), based on a short story by George Langalaan, was made during the sci-fi boom of the 1950s,
See full article at Cinelinx »

R.I.P. Robert Loggia

Veteran character actor Robert Loggia has died at his home in Los Angeles today at the age of 85. Loggia had been battling Alzheimer's Disease for five years and leaves behind his widow Audrey with whom he had been married for over three decades, three children, and a stepchild.

Starring in his first films back in the late 1950s, worked right up until this year with his last role being in the Canadian horror drama "Sicilian Vampire". Along the way he scored peer recognition including an Oscar nominated turn in the 1986 courtroom thriller "Jagged Edge" alongside Glenn Close and Jeff Bridges, and an Emmy nominated role as the lead in the detective drama series "Mancuso, F.B.I.".

His resume includes key roles in some major movies that ran the gamut in terms of critical and public appeal. Amongst the more notable titles are the likes of "Big," "Scarface, "Independence Day,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Oscar-Nominated Actor Robert Loggia Dies at 85

Oscar-Nominated Actor Robert Loggia Dies at 85
Robert Loggia, a durable and versatile tough guy actor in movies and TV shows including Brian De Palma’s 1983 drama “Scarface” and “Big,” died Friday at his home in Los Angeles, his widow Audrey confirmed to Variety. He was 85.

Loggia had been battling Alzheimer’s Disease for the past five years, according to his widow. They had been married for 33 years.

He was nominated for a supporting actor Academy Award for “Jagged Edge” in 1986 for his portrayal of blunt private detective Sam Ransom.

Loggia’s most notable film credits included “An Officer and a Gentleman,” “Prizzi’s Honor,” “Independence Day,” David Lynch’s “Lost Highway” and “Big,” in which he played a toy company owner and performed a memorable duet on a giant foot-operated piano with Tom Hanks. He played Miami drug lord Frank Lopez in “Scarface.”

Loggia was nominated for an Emmy in 1989 for his portrayal of FBI agent
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Day of the Dead List: Top 10 Most Piercingly Horrific Movie Screams

Top Ten Scream Queens: Barbara Steele, who both emitted screams and made others do same, is in a category of her own. Top Ten Scream Queens Halloween is over until next year, but the equally bewitching Day of the Dead is just around the corner. So, dead or alive, here's my revised and expanded list of cinema's Top Ten Scream Queens. This highly personal compilation is based on how memorable – as opposed to how loud or how frequent – were the screams. That's the key reason you won't find listed below actresses featured in gory slasher films. After all, the screams – and just about everything else in such movies – are as meaningless as their plots. You also won't find any screaming guys (i.e., Scream Kings) on the list below even though I've got absolutely nothing against guys who scream in horror, whether in movies or in life. There are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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