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The Raven (1963)

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A magician, who has been turned into a raven, turns to a former sorcerer for help.

Director:

Roger Corman

Writers:

Richard Matheson (screenplay), Edgar Allan Poe (poem)
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1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Vincent Price ... Dr. Erasmus Craven
Peter Lorre ... Dr. Adolphus Bedlo
Boris Karloff ... Dr. Scarabus
Hazel Court ... Lenore Craven
Olive Sturgess ... Estelle Craven
Jack Nicholson ... Rexford Bedlo
Connie Wallace Connie Wallace ... Maid
William Baskin William Baskin ... Grimes
Aaron Saxon Aaron Saxon ... Gort
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Storyline

In this tongue-in-cheek movie inspired by Poe's poem, Dr. Craven is the son of a great sorcerer (now dead) who was once himself quite skilled at that profession, but has since abandoned it. One evening, a cowardly fool of a magician named Bedlo comes to Craven for help - the evil Scarabus has turned him into a raven and he needs someone to change him back. He also tells the reluctant wizard that Craven's long-lost wife Lenore, whom he loved greatly and thought dead, is living with the despised Scarabus. Written by Ken Yousten <kyousten@bev.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Wits and wizardry run a-fowl! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Fantasy | Horror

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Boris Karloff's first feature film since "Corridors of Blood (1958)," shot in September and October 1962. See more »

Goofs

After Dr. Bedlow has been changed back to a human, he is talking with Dr. Craven when he notices a small framed color photograph of Lenore on a table. This film takes place long before photography was even invented. See more »

Quotes

[Craven and Bedloe enter the family crypt. It is full of dust and spider webs]
Dr. Bedloe: Hard place to keep clean, huh?
Dr. Craven: Yes, I very seldom get down here.
[Craven begins to unseal the coffin of his father as Bedloe brushes dust from the coffin lid]
Dr. Craven: Thank you.
[Craven opens the coffin lid, he loses his grip and it falls, smashing Bedloe's wing]
Dr. Bedloe: Owwww!
Dr. Craven: I'm sorry.
[Craven opens the coffin lid and looks at his father's corpse]
Dr. Craven: . Forgive me, Papa.
[...]
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Alternate Versions

One version has the climactic wizard duel without the rotoscoped bolts of magic. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Board James: Quija/Domino Rally (2015) See more »

User Reviews

 
Rapping at my Chamber Door
5 July 2014 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. It's been more than 50 years since this one was released, so it seems a good time to offer up some thoughts and observations. Let's start with the fact that you probably read Edgar Allen Poe's poem "The Raven" in high school. Director Roger Corman and writer Richard Matheson take Poe's work as a starting point in a most unique story of their own.

If you aren't familiar with Roger Corman, he is one of the most prolific and entertaining "B" movie makers of all time. His writer here, Mr. Matheson, is best known for his work on numerous episodes of "The Twilight Zone". Poe - Matheson - Corman would be enough, but we also get Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff, Hazel Court and Jack Nicholson. Price is always a treat to watch (especially in horror films), Lorre appeared in 3 of the greatest movies of all-time (M, The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca), Karloff is the master of monster, Ms Court was one of the first stars of Hammer Films, and of course, Nicholson (fresh-faced here) went on to become one of the most successful actors in movie history.

Price, Karloff, Lorre and Nicholson offer up four of the most unique voices ever heard in movies, and they each partake in the fun provided by Corman here. Yes, I said fun. This is almost slapstick comedy, and at a minimum, it's a parody of the much darker series of Poe films. If you consider it as an influence of the 1960's "Batman" TV series, you wouldn't be wrong. Even the music (heavy on the tuba) has an air of comedy.

Watching Peter Lorre as a matador is pretty funny, and some of the back-and-forth with he and Nicholson as father and son is clearly ad-libbed, but the classic comedic sequence occurs when Price and Karloff take their wizardry duel to the death and turn it into a special effects highlight reel.

This may be the only time you hear the phrase "precious viper" used to describe a woman, and if that, combined with all of the above reasons, isn't enough to motivate you to seek this one out, then maybe you will never discover why so many adore the films of Roger Corman. Compared with films of today, this style is nevermore.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 January 1963 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Raven See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA

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Box Office

Budget:

$200,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Alta Vista Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Pathécolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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