6.2/10
328
16 user 2 critic

Mary, Mary (1963)

Nine months after they split up Bob and Mary meet at his New York apartment to sort out some tax matters. He's getting married to healthy-eating Tiffany as soon as the divorce becomes final... See full summary »

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writers:

Jean Kerr (stage play), Richard L. Breen (screenplay)
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Debbie Reynolds ... Mary McKellaway
Barry Nelson ... Bob McKellaway
Diane McBain ... Tiffany Richards
Hiram Sherman Hiram Sherman ... Oscar Nelson
Michael Rennie ... Dirk Winsten
Edit

Storyline

Nine months after they split up Bob and Mary meet at his New York apartment to sort out some tax matters. He's getting married to healthy-eating Tiffany as soon as the divorce becomes final, and she is attracted by fellow tenant Dirk Winston, a Hollywood star and - according to Bob - between Bob and Mary. He's frightened to be alone with her for a start. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Stage Hit - 3 Blushing Years of Broadway is NOW ON THE SCREEN in Blushing Technicolor

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The picture behind Doug's desk is that of actor Monty Woolly who died the same year the film was released. See more »

Goofs

Woken by a ringing bell Mary opens the door and lets Tiffany in who crosses the room and opens the curtains revealing that it's daylight . Strong shadows point in all directions as being from studio lights. See more »

Quotes

Bob McKellaway: [lovingly] I married Mary because she was so direct, and straightforward, and said exactly what she meant.
Oscar Nelson: Why did you divorce her?
Bob McKellaway: [sternly] Because she was so direct, and straightforward, and said exactly what she meant.
See more »

Connections

References Rebecca (1940) See more »

User Reviews

 
Debbie, Debbie...
28 October 2012 | by jhkpSee all my reviews

This is a version of the very long running (1,500+ performances) Broadway comedy by Jean Kerr, wife of New York Times theater critic Walter Kerr and author of the novel, Please Don't Eat The Daisies.

It would have been a much better film if Debbie Reynolds been given better (or any) direction.

Debbie was sometimes not adept at playing it real, there was sometimes a sense that she was making an effort. But at her best, she was spontaneous and delightful - especially in her earlier efforts like Singin' In The Rain, Athena, Give A Girl A Break, I Love Melvin, etc.

Take a look at Debbie in Susan Slept Here (written and directed by Frank Tashlin) if you don't think she could be real, believable, touching, funny, and everything else she is supposed to be here, and isn't. There's a reason she became a bigger star than many of the MGM girls she originally appeared in support of - and guys, for that matter. Even when she isn't too good (as in this film) it's obvious that she has star power. Imagine a film starring the other four leads and no Debbie.

The trouble here is that, rather than relying on her own vocal inflections, and her proved ability to deliver comic dialogue, she gives an imitation of Barbara Bel Geddes (the original star of the Broadway show)! I don't know whose idea this was, but it wasn't a good one.

It's a decent romantic comedy that has a lot of pretty good jokes about the contemporary fads and foibles of the day. The action really doesn't leave the apartment set. The set and costumes are in deliberately neutral tones, like they were designed to be shot in black and white. (The brightest colors are in the title sequence.) Like Debbie's performance, the stylized color scheme serves to distance us from the story, since it encourages us not to forget we're watching something unreal. The whole thing is shot at some distance from the actors - though this seems to have been Mervyn LeRoy's later style, in general. This also hampers involvement.

The performances of Barry Nelson and Michael Rennie - the original Broadway stars - as well as Hiram Sherman, who took over on Broadway from James Cromwell, the actor and director ("Since You Went Away"), are quite good, and Diane MacBain is charming.


3 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 16 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 April 1964 (Finland) See more »

Also Known As:

Mary Mary See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed