7.0/10
15,374
113 user 78 critic

Lord of the Flies (1963)

Not Rated | | Adventure, Drama, Thriller | 13 August 1963 (USA)
Trailer
1:53 | Trailer

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ON DISC
Lost on an island, young survivors of a plane crash eventually revert to savagery despite the few rational boys' attempts to prevent that.

Director:

Peter Brook

Writer:

William Golding (novel)
Reviews
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
James Aubrey ... Ralph
Tom Chapin ... Jack
Hugh Edwards ... Piggy
Roger Elwin Roger Elwin ... Roger
Tom Gaman Tom Gaman ... Simon
Roger Allan Roger Allan ... Piers
David Brunjes David Brunjes ... Donald
Peter Davy Peter Davy ... Peter
Kent Fletcher Kent Fletcher ... Percival Wemys Madison
Nicholas Hammond ... Robert
Christopher Harris Christopher Harris ... Bill
Alan Heaps Alan Heaps ... Neville
Jonathan Heaps Jonathan Heaps ... Howard
Burnes Hollyman Burnes Hollyman ... Douglas
Andrew Horne Andrew Horne ... Matthew
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Storyline

A group of young boys are stranded alone on an island. Left to fend for themselves, they must take on the responsibilities of adults, even if they are not ready to do so. Inevitably, two factions form: one group (lead by Ralph) want to build shelters and collect food, whereas Jack's group would rather have fun and HUNT; illustrating the difference between civilization and savagery. Written by Murray Chapman <muzzle@cs.uq.oz.au>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Evil is inherent in the human mind, whatever innocence may cloak it...


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 August 1963 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El señor de las moscas See more »

Filming Locations:

Aguadilla, Puerto Rico See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$250,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Two Arts Ltd. See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The name of the boy who is whipped at the end is Piers in the movie (though his name is not mentioned in the dialogue), but was Wilfred in the book. The reasons that Jack imposed this punishment remain unspecified in both the movie and the book. See more »

Goofs

In at least one place the plaintive cry of the mourning dove can be clearly heard (at 1:23:47 as Ralph wakes on the last morning). This common North American bird is not found in the Pacific islands where the story takes place, but reflects the fact that the film was shot in the Caribbean. See more »

Quotes

Roger: LOOK! The beast!
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits list the entire production crew but none of the actors. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Recess: School's Out (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Kyrie Eleison
(uncredited)
Performed by Choir Group
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Incredible Movie - A Forgotten Gem
26 March 2004 | by john-1361See all my reviews

Director Peter Brook delivered a very powerful and artfully done film based upon the classic book by William Golding. To those who have commented here about the differences between the book and this film: these are two very different mediums. Brook did not attempt a straight adaptation, he presented Golding's story through his own vision and emotional lens.

The use of non-professional children is one of the things that make this a brilliant film, and vastly superior to the obnoxious 1990's version. If you pay attention to the opening minutes of Brook's film, you will notice that the world presented is nice, normal, clean, and functional. The boys deliver their lines well and the story flows smoothly. Once the boys are on the island, the scenes aren't nearly so smooth in transition, the speech becomes very awkward and the boys interaction with each other is stilted and unnatural.

That is the point! These children know the direction they are going is wrong, to a boy they know this. Yet as individuals they are helpless to stand up to the group. Their awkwardness flows from their fear of being cast out, while yearning to be rescued and return to their homes. The nightmarish quality of the situation is well reflected in the hesitant speech and graceless movements. The uneasy stringing together of scenes makes the viewer squirm, hopefully making the connection to how ill at ease and unnatural the boys themselves must feel.

I'm sure most of you have been around boys of this age at some point in your life. They are prone to being tongue-tied, have few social graces and lack physical co-ordination. That's what makes this film so utterly believable, the boys are real boys, not pimped-out Hollywood trick ponies, delivering their lines in perfect Shakespearean English, while nimbly doing complicated dance moves and mugging their perfect little faces square at the camera.

Golding's book is a masterpiece that can be taken on several levels. Brook's film offers no fewer interpretations of the deeper meaning while presenting a realistic and horrific vision of the basic story. I know most people simply will not get this film. That's too bad because it is a classic.


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