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Horror-on-Sea 2018 Interview: Writer/director Pat Higgins

With over a decade of experience as a horror writer and director, Pat Higgins will be Horror-on-Sea Film Festival on Saturday 20th January with his latest Master Class: Fear and Film. I got chance to ask Pat a few questions about what we can expect from the talk, some of his influences in horror and the various incarnations of his film The House on the Witchpit.

What can we expect from the Master Class: Fear and Film?

We try to have a mix of useful tips and tricks for people making independent horror movies, along with unseen video clips and (hopefully) entertaining stories! There are a couple of live shows from previous years over at http://pathiggins.me.uk/appearances/ for the curious. This year’s show is very much focused on fear itself, and the relationship between fear and movies. I’ll be sharing the movies that scared the
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Crypt of Curiosities: The Cat People Films

  • DailyDead
Next to Universal, few studios have had such a big impact on horror than Rko Radio Pictures. Started in 1927, Rko was the first studio founded to make exclusively sound films, a then-brand-new invention that served as a major draw for the studio. Rko’s life was relatively short (it was killed just 30 years after forming), but during their time, they put out a seriously impressive number of classics, including Top Hat, It’s a Wonderful Life, The Informer, and most notably, Citizen Kane.

Of course, Rko didn’t shy away from horror. While their output wasn’t nearly as prolific as, say, Universal’s, it was still quite impressive, boasting some of the most formative and important horror films of old Hollywood. Rko saw the release of a few all-time classics, including I Walked With a Zombie, The Thing From Another World, King Kong, and the topic of today’s Crypt,
See full article at DailyDead »

Edgar Wright’s 100 Favorite Horror Movies, From ‘Nosferatu’ to ‘The Witch’

Edgar Wright’s 100 Favorite Horror Movies, From ‘Nosferatu’ to ‘The Witch’
Your ultimate Halloween horror movie binge is here. Edgar Wright has joined forces with Mubi to list his 100 favorite horror movies, and the collection is full of classics and surprising choices that range from 1922 to 2016. The director, who himself has given the genre a classic title thanks to “Shaun of the Dead,” names recent horror hits like “Raw,” “The Witch,” and “Train to Busan,” as well as classics from horror masters James Whale and Mario Bava.

Read More:Edgar Wright’s 40 Favorite Movies Ever Made (Right Now): ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Suspiria’ and More

Wright wrote an introduction to his list, in which he makes it clear this is simply a list of 100 favorite titles and not his definitive list of the best horror films ever. You can read Wright’s statement below:

Here, for Halloween, is a chronological list of my favorite horror movies. It’s not in any way
See full article at Indiewire »

Smackdown 1963: Three from "Tom Jones" and Two Dames

Presenting the Supporting Actresses of '63. Well well, what have we here? This year's statistical uniqueness (the only time one film ever produced three supporting actress nominees) and the character lineup reads juicier than it actually is - your Fab Five are, get this: a saucy wench, a pious auntie, a disgraced lady, a pillpopping royal, and a stubborn nun.

The Nominees 

from left to right: Cilento, Evans, Redman, Rutherford, Skalia

In 1963 Oscar voters went for an all-first-timers nominee list in Supporting Actress. The eldest contenders would soon become Dames (Margaret Rutherford and Edith Evans were both OBEs at the time). Rutherford, the eventual winner, was the only nominee with an extensive film history and she was in the middle of a hot streak with her signature role as Jane Marple which ran across multiple films from through 1961-1965. In fact, Agatha Christie had just dedicated her new book "The
See full article at FilmExperience »

It Came From The Tube: How Awful About Allan (1970)

If anyone wrote the book on complicated parental relations, it’s Anthony Perkins. While Mother is nowhere to be found, this time around Tony is having Daddy issues in How Awful About Allan (1970), an effective, low key TV thriller directed by Curtis Harrington (The Dead Don’t Die). As long as you can leave Norman up in his room, you should have a good time.

Originally airing as an ABC Movie of the Week (because of course) on Tuesday, September 22nd, Allan had to contend with Hee Haw/All in the Family on CBS and the NBC Tuesday Night at the Movies. At the time however, ABC had this format on lockdown with audiences, and for good reason – they always brought in top shelf talent to display on the small screen, and How Awful About Allan is certainly no exception.

Let’s dig out our trusty and totally unreal TV
See full article at DailyDead »

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)
(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Book Review: "Robert Wise: The Motion Pictures" By Joe Jordan

  • CinemaRetro
By Dean Brierly

For a film director with such an iconic resume, there’s a surprising scarcity of scholarly books devoted to Robert Wise, the man who directed such classics as "West Side Story" (1961), "The Haunting" (1963), “The Sound of Music” (1965), “The Curse of the Cat People” (1944), “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (1951), “The Sand Pebbles” (1966) and many other critical and commercial successes. To say nothing of his stature as the man who edited “Citizen Kane” (1941) and “The Magnificent Ambersons” (1942) before taking up decades-long residence in the director’s chair.

Wise brought a self-effacing approach to directing, one that never drew attention to itself. He may have had the most “invisible” style of all the major directors from Hollywood’s Golden Era, which no doubt helps explain why he never had the auteur imprimatur conferred upon him by French critics who swooned over Welles’ baroque visuals, Douglas Sirk’s melodramatic excess,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The director who sparked survival horror videogames

Ryan Lambie Oct 31, 2016

Before Resident Evil, there was Sweet Home. Ryan looks at how a half-forgotten film and game spawned a videogame genre...

Ring, Audition, Dark Water, Onibaba, House, Kuroneko... ask most film fans to name a prominent Japanese horror, and one of those titles would probably come up. Ask most videogame fanatics to name a Japanese horror game, and they'd probably reply with Resident Evil, Silent Hill, or, if they're feeling a bit retro, Splatterhouse or Castlevania.

See related  Marvel's Luke Cage episode 13 viewing notes: You Know My Steez The Punisher: 5 new cast members and 2017 release confirmed

There's one name that almost certainly won't come up in conversations about either category: Sweet Home. Yet this 1989 horror, and the videogame of the same name released with it, inadvertently helped define an entire genre - and even spawn the Resident Evil franchise, which is still going 20 years later.

The Sweet Home
See full article at Den of Geek »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Zombie (1979)

“The boat can leave now. Tell the crew.” With these words, a horror classic was born. Zombie (1979) was the first Lucio Fulci film that assaulted my eyeballs, And it was the first zombie flick I ever saw. Heady stuff for a quivering ten-year-old, but it proved to be the perfect gateway to the splattery splendors of Italian terror, a door that will forever remain ajar.

Let me be as straightforward as I can: if you’re a fan of Fulci but haven’t caught this yet, you can forget about the surrealism of The Beyond (1981) or the Lovecraftian flourishes of City of the Living Dead (1980). This is Fulci driving a simple narrative right through the hearts of horror lovers everywhere, coming out the back bloodied and unbound, unapologetic in its mission statement to horrify and repulse. Mission accomplished.

Zombie was released in Italy in August of 1979 as Zombi 2, titled
See full article at DailyDead »

Babak Anvari interview: Under The Shadow, horror, Statham

Sarah Dobbs Oct 7, 2016

The director of the brilliant Under The Shadow chats to us about how his childhood memories and love of horror movies inspired him

Every now and then, a horror movie comes along that gets people excited. Not just horror fans, but critics and cinemagoers who aren’t normally into scares. Recently we’ve had The Babadook, with its story about grief and difficult relationships between parents and their kids, and The Witch, which grabbed attention with its authentic 17th century setting and hard-to-understand accents even before the devil worshipping kicked off.

Now, there’s another scary movie that’s racking up glowing reviews left, right, and centre – everyone from the Guardian to the NME to Variety and, well, Den of Geek has raved about Under The Shadow. A brilliantly scary portrayal of life in war-torn Iran, it’s got a claustrophobic atmosphere, stunning camerawork, and some excellent
See full article at Den of Geek »

Cat People

This kitty needs no introduction: Simone Simon is the purring-sweet immigrant with a dark atavistic secret. It's Val Lewton's debut smash hit. The real hero is director Jacques Tourneur, who conveys a feeling of real life being lived that won over audiences of 1942 and drew them into his web of fantasy. Cat People Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 833 1942 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 73 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date September 20, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Simone Simon, Kent Smith, Tom Conway, Jane Randolph, Jack Holt, Elizabeth Russell, Theresa Harris. Cinematography Nicholas Musuraca Art Direction Albert S. D'Agostino, Walter E. Keller Film Editor Mark Robson Original Music Roy Webb Written by De Witt Bodeen Directed by Jacques Tourneur

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Val Lewton never had to be 'discovered,' actually. Life magazine awarded him his own photo layout and the critics praised him as the maker of a new brand of psychologically based horror films.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

These Three

Radical changes were required to adapt Lillian Hellman's Broadway play for post-Code Hollywood, to eradicate a theme that in 1934 was entirely taboo. But were audiences really unaware of the subject matter switch? William Wyler excels with this bowdlerized, yet curiously near-perfect, story about the power of scandal. These Three DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1936 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 93 min. / Street Date February 9, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Miriam Hopkins, Merle Oberon, Joel McCrea, Catharine Doucet, Alma Kruger, Bonita Granville, Marcia Mae Jones , Carmencita Johnson, Mary Ann Durkin, Margaret Hamilton, Walter Brennan. Cinematography Gregg Toland Film Editor Daniel Mandell Original Music Alfred Newman Written by Lillian Hellman Produced by Samuel Goldwyn Directed by William Wyler

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

William Wyler directed half a decade's worth of silent westerns before his big break came. From that point on he made high profile dramas, almost all of which are excellent movies.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Event Horizon: from doomed ship to cult gem

Ryan Lambie Jul 7, 2016

Marred by a troubled production, Event Horizon was a box office flop in 1997. But time has been kind to the sci-fi horror, Ryan writes...

In the spring of 1997, movie journalism was dominated by discussions of doomed ships. James Cameron’s Titanic, originally scheduled for the lucrative 4th July slot that summer, had suffered yet another delay. It added fuel to the growing speculation that Cameron was at the helm of a potential disaster akin to Heaven's Gate. The cost of making the movie had swollen to such huge levels - $200m according to some accounts, and possibly higher according to others - that the financial burden was shouldered by two of Hollywood’s biggest studios, Fox and Paramount.

Speaking to the La Times in April that year, Titanic’s first assistant director Sebastian Silva admitted that “The horror stories are true” - referring to the news of an unhappy cast and crew,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Russ Tamblyn And George Chakiris At "West Side Story" Screening, L.A., June 29

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

The Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 55th anniversary screening of Robert Wise’s Oscar-winning 1961 musical West Side Story. The 152-minute film will be screened on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 7:30 pm. Starring Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn and Rita Moreno, the screening is scheduled to precede appearances by George Chakiris who played Bernardo and Russ Tamblyn who played Riff.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

West Side Story (1961)

55th Anniversary Screening

One of the most honored and commercially successful of all movie musicals, West Side Story earned a near-record 10 Academy Awards in 1961.The film version of the groundbreaking stage musical that re-imagined Romeo and Juliet in contemporary New York City retained and deepened the play’s emotional impact by bringing together a show business all-star team. The show’s director and choreographer,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

A Bad “Omen:” A Review of A&E’s “Damien”

When I was a kid, there were a number of films that could genuinely scare me: “The Haunting” (the original Robert Wise version), “The Innocents”, “The Uninvited.” These were all films that dealt in the shadows; that tantalized and scared us with what might be hidden in that half open closet in the bedroom versus what actually was. The filmmakers who made these groundbreaking thrillers were hip to one key rule of horror and that is that our imagination is often times more frightening than the man in the rubber monster suit who jumps out and shouts “boo!” The “Omen”

A Bad “Omen:” A Review of A&E’s “Damien”
See full article at TVovermind.com »

The Captive City

Robert Wise's taut noir suspenser about the Mafia takeover of a small city is like an underworld Invasion of the Body Snatchers. John Forsythe's newsman slowly realizes that gambling corruption has infiltrated the business district, city hall, and even his close associates; he's expected to become a crook too, or else. Great docudrama style aided by a special deep-focus lens; Estes Kefauver makes a personal appearance touting the crime-busting Washington committee that inspired the picture. The Captive City Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1952 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 91 min. Street Date January 5, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring John Forsythe, Joan Camden, Marjorie Crossland, Victor Sutherland, Ray Teal, Martin Milner, Geraldine Hall, Hal K. Dawson, Paul Brinegar, Estes Kefauver, Victor Romito. Cinematography Lee Garmes Film Editor Robert Swink Original Music Jerome Moross Written by Alvin M. Josephy Jr., Karl Kamb Produced by Theron Warth Directed by Robert Wise

Reviewed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Day of the Dead Movie List: Top 5 Most Freakish Living Dead, Undead, and Ghosts

Hell's Kitchen: Soul stew image likely from the 1922 Benjamin Christensen horror classic 'Häxan / Witchcraft Through the Ages.' Day of the Dead post: Cinema's Top Five Scariest Living Dead We should all be eternally grateful to the pagans, who had the foresight to come up with many (most?) of the overworked Western world's religious holidays. Thanks to them, besides Easter, Christmas, New Year's, and possibly Mardi Gras (a holiday in some countries), we also have Halloween, All Saints' Day, and the Day of Dead. The latter two are public holidays in a number of countries with large Catholic populations. Since today marks the end of the annual Halloween / All Saints' Day / Day of the Dead celebrations, I'm posting my revised and expanded list of the movies' Top Five Scariest Living Dead. Of course, by that I don't mean the actors listed below were dead when the movies were made.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

10 Films to Watch Before Seeing ‘Crimson Peak’

Regardless of the budget at his disposal, Guillermo del Toro always incorporates a wide range of influences in his films — just look at Pan’s Labyrinth, or take a quick peek at a recently launched Twitter account that puts other directors’ use of the platform to shame — and it’s no different with his forthcoming Crimson Peak.

We said in our review, “Crimson Peak works as many things: a melodramatic romance; both the recreation of a period and a revival of the way movies have made us perceive it; a genre-jumping comedy; and a critique of capitalistic excess. It does these things earnestly and without compromise, and it’s far braver — far more admirable — for having done so. What Guillermo del Toro’s new film doesn’t work as: a haunted-house picture.”

So if you’re seeking something to fill the horror void or want a few options that are
See full article at The Film Stage »

Guillermo del Toro: ‘I try to tell you a story with eye-protein, not eye-candy’

In his new film, Crimson Peak, the Mexican director pays homage to the gothic romance. Here, he talks about about how he brings together pulp comic illustration and Romantic art to bring his ‘childhood imaginarium’ to life

• Del Toro’s pop-cultural influences

Crimson Peak’s visual style

Kim Newman on gothic cinema

“Do you believe in evil?” I ask Guillermo del Toro. He doesn’t even have to think about it. “Human evil? Yes. I think that evil is a spiritual engine in our world, our lives, our universe, that functions in order to create good,” he says. “And it is necessary, an essential part of the cycle of construction and destruction. But I do not believe in it as a sentient force. I do not believe there’s a guy in red goat-feet planning on my demise. And I don’t believe there is a guy rooting for me up in some cloudscape.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

10 Commonly Overlooked Horror Films Worth Seeing

When I was a kid, I used to love a scary movie. I remember catching the original The Haunting (1963) one night on Channel 9’s Million Dollar Movie when I was home alone. Before it was over, I had every light in the house on. When my mother got home she was screaming she’d been able to see the house glowing from two blocks away. The only thing screaming louder than her was the electricity meter.

That was something of an accomplishment, scaring me like that. Oh, it’s not that I was hard to scare (I still don’t like going down into a dark cellar). But, in those days, the movies didn’t have much to scare you with. Back as far as the 50s, you might find your odd dismemberment and impaling, even an occasional decapitation, but, generally, the rule of the day was restraint. Even those rare dismemberments,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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