Come Blow Your Horn (1963) - News Poster

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Oscar’s Longest Losing Streaks: 11 People With 10-Plus Nominations and No Wins (Photos)

Oscar’s Longest Losing Streaks: 11 People With 10-Plus Nominations and No Wins (Photos)
Cinematographer Roger Deakins hopes to snap his losing streak this year with his 14th nomination, for “Blade Runner 2049.” Greg P. Russell (16 nominations) Veteran sound mixer Greg P. Russell earned his first nomination for 1989’s “Black Rain.” He almost earned a 17th nomination, for 2016’s “13 Hours,” but his nomination was rescinded after he “violated Academy campaign regulations that prohibit telephone lobbying.” Roland Anderson (15) The longtime art director picked up his first nomination for “A Farewell to Arms” in 1934 — and then lost for such classics as 1961’s “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and 1963’s “Come Blow Your Horn.” Alex North (15) ...
See full article at The Wrap »

The Furniture Index

Can we have a random break for applause for Daniel Walber's The Furniture column. It was Daniel's birthday this weekend so he has the day off. He's already 69 episodes in to this incredible series which has been filled with sharp insights, a keen eye, and rich Hollywood anecdotes. Here's everything he's covered thus far. Please show your love in the comments if you look forward to these each Monday.

The Forties and Fifties

Hold Back the Dawn (1941) Bored at the border

How Green Was My Valley (1941) Designing dignity

That Hamilton Woman (1941) High ceilings

• Captain of the Clouds (1942) A Canadian air show

• The Magnificent Andersons (1942) Victorian Palace / Manifest Destiny

My Gal Sal (1942) Nonsense Gay Nineties

The Shanghai Gesture (1942) Appropriating Chinese design

Black Narcissus (1947) Mad for matte paintings

David and Bathsheba (1951) A humble palace of moral struggle

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Decorative madness

My Cousin Rachel (1952) Ghosts of property

Lust for Life
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Furniture: Comedy by Design in Come Blow Your Horn

1963 is our "Year of the Month" for September. So we'll be celebrating its films randomly throughout the month. Here's Daniel Walber...

Once upon a time, there were two production design categories at the Oscars. From 1945 through 1956, and again from 1959 through 1966, color films and black and white films competed separately. The Academy nominated ten films every year after 1950, creating a whole lot more room for variety.

This especially benefited comedy, a genre that has since fallen out of favor with Oscar. And while Come Blow Your Horn might not be the funniest of the 1960s, it is certainly one of the most deserving nominees of the era. Adapted by Norman Lear from a Neil Simon play, this Frank Sinatra vehicle stages most of its antics in one of cinema’s most luxurious apartments, the work of art directors Roland Anderson (Breakfast at Tiffany’s) and Hal Pereira (Vertigo) and set decorators
See full article at FilmExperience »

Movie Poster of the Week: Frank Sinatra in Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Italian 4-foglio for The Joker is Wild (Charles Vidor, USA, 1957). Art by Enzo Nistri.Frank Sinatra, arguably the most important entertainer of the 20th century, was born 100 years ago today. I’ve become a little obsessed with him over the past week after watching Alex Gibney’s terrific 2-part, 4-hour HBO portrait Sinatra: All or Nothing at All. This of course got me thinking about Frank in movie posters, and I realized that I could barely come up with images of Sinatra posters in my head. While his best album covers are indelible and iconic, his movie posters tend to be less so. Scrolling through his filmography I realized that part of the problem is that his greatest films—On the Town, From Here to Eternity, Guys and Dolls, Some Came Running, Ocean’s 11—were almost always ensemble films in which Sinatra was never the standalone star, and so
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: Frank Sinatra in Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Italian 4-foglio for The Joker is Wild (Charles Vidor, USA, 1957). Art by Enzo Nistri.Frank Sinatra, arguably the most important entertainer of the 20th century, was born 100 years ago today. I’ve become a little obsessed with him over the past week after watching Alex Gibney’s terrific 2-part, 4-hour HBO portrait Sinatra: All or Nothing at All. This of course got me thinking about Frank in movie posters, and I realized that I could barely come up with images of Sinatra posters in my head. While his best album covers are indelible and iconic, his movie posters tend to be less so. Scrolling through his filmography I realized that part of the problem is that his greatest films—On the Town, From Here to Eternity, Guys and Dolls, Some Came Running, Ocean’s 11—were almost always ensemble films in which Sinatra was never the standalone star, and so
See full article at MUBI »

Bud Yorkin, ‘Jeffersons’ and ‘All in the Family’ Director-Producer, Dies at 89

Bud Yorkin, ‘Jeffersons’ and ‘All in the Family’ Director-Producer, Dies at 89
Bud Yorkin, director of influential 1970s TV shows including “All In The Family,” “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “Sanford and Sons” and “Diff’rent Strokes,” died Aug. 18 of natural causes at his home in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 89.

Yorkin played a pivotal role in developing some of the most popular series of the 1970s in partnership with Norman Lear at Tandem Productions. He was nominated for three Emmys and worked on TV series that won 25 Emmys and 10 Golden Globes. His feature film directing credits included “Love Hurts,” “Twice In A Lifetime,” “Arthur 2: On The Rocks,” “The Thief Who Came To Dinner” and “Inspector Clouseau.”

After working in the 1950s on numerous award-winning variety shows, he teamed with writer Lear in 1959 to form Tandem Productions, and made his film directing debut with “Come Blow Your Horn” starring Frank Sinatra. Yorkin had previously worked with Lear on such
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bud Yorkin, ‘Jeffersons’ and ‘All in the Family’ Director-Producer, Dies at 89

Bud Yorkin, director of influential 1970s TV shows including “All In The Family,” “Maude,” “The Jeffersons,” “Sanford and Sons” and “Diff’rent Strokes,” died Aug. 18 of natural causes at his home in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 89.

Yorkin played a pivotal role in developing some of the most popular series of the 1970s in partnership with Norman Lear at Tandem Productions. He was nominated for three Emmys and worked on TV series that won 25 Emmys and 10 Golden Globes. His feature film directing credits included “Love Hurts,” “Twice In A Lifetime,” “Arthur 2: On The Rocks,” “The Thief Who Came To Dinner” and “Inspector Clouseau.”

After working in the 1950s on numerous award-winning variety shows, he teamed with writer Lear in 1959 to form Tandem Productions, and made his film directing debut with “Come Blow Your Horn” starring Frank Sinatra. Yorkin had previously worked with Lear on such
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bud Yorkin dies aged 89

  • ScreenDaily
Bud Yorkin dies aged 89
The film and television director, producer and writer died of natural causes at his Bel Air Home. He was 89.

Yorkin was born in the coal mining town of Washington, Pennsylvania on February 22 1926 and after serving in the Navy embarked on a career as a camera engineer for NBC.

He became a stage manager and then writer, working on NBC’s variety showcase The Colgate Comedy Hour. He moved into directing that show and then directed stints on programmes such as The Spike Jones Show and Light’s Diamond Jubilee.

Film director credits include Love Hurts, Twice In A Lifetime, Arthur 2: On The Rocks, The Thief Who Came To Dinner, Start The Revolution Without Me, Inspector Clouseau, Divorce American Style and Come Blow Your Horn.

He also served as executive producer on Blade Runner and played a role as producer in bringing to fruition the sequel, which is set to begin shooting next summer.

His credits
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Revolution season 2 episode 17 review: Why We Fight

Review Billy Grifter 21 Mar 2014 - 07:52

Revolution delivers one of its better episodes in Why We Fight. Here's Billy's review...

This review contains spoilers.

2.17 Why We Fight

After so many disjointed and unsuccessful stories, those behind Revolution took an entirely different tack with Why We Fight, and the result was a singularly more watchable story. It wasn’t a huge surprise to discover that this was written by Rockne S. O'Bannon, who also penned the stronger stories this season, Come Blow Your Horn and Mis Dos Padres.

There was no hint this week of Aaron and his long walk back from Lubbock, if he’s not still there having another Matrix experience. And, with relatively little from Tom and Jason, they managed to write simple but effective narrative with the basic premise of answering the question of the hour for the majority of characters.

Undoubtedly the episode's strongest parts involved Miles and Gene,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Revolution season 2 episode 9 review: Everyone Says I Love You

Review Billy Grifter 22 Nov 2013 - 06:31

Has Stockholm Syndrome set in, or did Billy just really enjoy an episode of Revolution? Here's his latest review...

This review contains spoilers.

2.9 Everyone Says I Love You

It’s not easy for me to say this, given what a hard time I’ve given this show in the past. But episode nine of this season rocked on a number of significant levels, and we may have witnessed a transformation that few series ever manage to achieve.

It started out so typically Revolution, i.e. dumb. Miles, Charlie and Rachel enter the Patriot compound to discover that everyone is already unconscious. Charlie and Miles have automatic weapons, where Rachel is ready for anything with… a knife. It looks stupid, and someone should have at least handed her a pistol.

Not finding Aaron, they enter the seemingly endless collection of secret tunnels that pervades the world of Revolution.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Revolution season 2 episode 8 review: Come Blow Your Horn

Review Billy Grifter 16 Nov 2013 - 10:26

After a couple of ropey episodes, Revolution returns to some form. Here's Billy's review...

This review contains spoilers.

2.8 Come Blow Your Horn

I’m hoping that the whole faking Bass’s death represented a low point that Revolution can now climb away from, and in many respects, Come Blow Your Horn did seem much less of a mess than the previous two stories.

Okay, in terms of a overall narrative it wasn’t brilliant, but it demonstrated some intention at progression for some very obvious flaws. Aaron is captured by the single minded Dr. Horn who seems determined to extract the most from the crossing of their paths. In this we got the strongest indication yet that Horn is destined to be around for the rest of the season, as they took the time to provide him with a back story. It was a simple enough one,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Revolution, Ep. 2.08: “Come Blow Your Horn” trumpets the show’s improvements

Revolution, Season 2, Episode 8: “Come Blow Your Horn

Written by Rockne S. O’Bannon

Directed by Charles Beeson

Airs Wednesdays at 8 pm (Et) on NBC

Another episode of Revolution, another set of key characters in captivity. Both Aaron and Gene find themselves guests of Dr. Horn and the Patriots (Gene is also subdued by his own family, and we’ll get to that). The act of placing its characters unwillingly under the care of enemies is a well the show draws from time and time again. While it can work effectively as a tension-building device, having our main crew fall into Patriot (or Militia, or another enemy) shackles time and time again contributes to the law of diminishing returns, especially when the more handy members of the gang bust out of their predicaments within minutes.

That said, “Come Blow Your Horn” offers some nice character beats along with the requisite action,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

New Revolution Season 2,Episode 8 Intense Spoilers & Clips Hit The Net

New Revolution season 2,episode 8 intense spoilers & clips hit the net. Last night, NBC delivered the new spoilers and sneak peek/spoiler clip (below) for their upcoming "Revolution" episode 8 of season 2. The episode is entitled, "Come Blow Your Horn," and it appears that it'll be quite intense and drama-filled as Rachel has to make an important decision that could cost the life of someone close to her, and more! In the new "Come Blow Your Horn" episode, Miles and company are going to try to escape the perils of their current situation. Rachel and Gene will continue to struggle with their relationship, which affects Charlie. In the meantime, Neville will end up, taking a gamble with the Patriots. Episode 8 is scheduled to air on Wednesday night, November 13th at 7pm central time on NBC.
See full article at OnTheFlix »

New Revolution Season 2,Episode 8 Official Spoilers,Plotline Revealed By NBC

New Revolution season 2,episode 8 official spoilers,plotline revealed by NBC. Recently, NBC served up the new,official,synopsis/spoilers for their upcoming "Revolution" episode 8 of season 2. The episode is entitled, "Come Blow Your Horn," and it sounds like it'll be pretty dramatic and interesting as Rachel and Gene continue to struggle with their relationship,Neville gambles with the Patriots, and more. In the new, "Come Blow Your Horn" episode, as Miles and the gang try to escape the perils of their current situation, Rachel and Gene will continue to struggle with their relationship, which affects Charlie. Meanwhile, Neville will take a gamble with the Patriots. Episode 8 is due to air on Wednesday night, November 13th at 7pm central time on NBC.
See full article at OnTheFlix »

Stage Tube: Happy 80th Birthday, Joel Grey!

Today, April 11, Broadway legend Joel Grey celebrates his 80th birthday Grey originated the role of the Master of Ceremonies in the Broadway musical Cabaret in 1966 for which he won the Tony Award. Additional Broadway credits include Come Blow Your Horn 1961, Stop the World - I Want to Get Off 1962, Half a Sixpence 1965,George M 1968, Goodtime Charley 1975, The Grand Tour 1979, Chicago 1996, and Wicked 2003. Grey won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in March 1973 for his performance as the Master of Ceremonies in the 1972 film version of Cabaret.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

DVD Blu-Ray, March 27: 'Casablanca' 70th Anniversary, 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close'

The week's biggest release is not a new flick straight from the theater desperate to recoup some profits, but a collector's edition of one of the greatest movies of all time. Whether you're DVD or Blu-ray, streaming or rental, we've got the breakdown on all the home entertainment releases for the week -- as well as a special exclusive look at the "Casablanca" 70th anniversary Blu-ray box set. Moviefone's New Release Pick of the Week "Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel" What's It About? "Corman's World" offers a comprehensive look at the king of Hollywood B-movies, Roger Corman; the documentary features interviews with everyone from Jack Nicholson to Martin Scorsese ruminating on the filmmaker's long and notorious career. See It Because: It's an amazingly entertaining exploration of one of the most fascinating corners of film history. While the highbrow merits of Corman's movies are practically non-existent, his prolific and
See full article at Moviefone »

Warner Bros. gets the Sequel and Prequel Rights to Blade Runner

It looks like we can be expecting a new Blade Runner movie to hit theaters in the next few years. Warner Bros-based Alcon Entertainment (the financing and production company behind The Blind Side and The Book of Eli) are currently in final discussions to secure film, television, and ancillary franchise rights to develop prequels and sequels to Ridley Scott‘s classic 1982 sci-fi film.

I just want to point out that the deal exclude rights to remake the original film, so you will not see a remake of Blade Runner.

I've always wanted to see more movies made based on the world of Blade Runner. Hopefully they will end up being worthy of the film that Scott created and live up to the expectations of the fans. That's not going to be an easy thing to do, and I'm sure not everyone will be happy with the outcome. Moon director Duncan Jones
See full article at GeekTyrant »

‘Blade Runner’ Prequel/Sequel Rights Acquired By Warner Bros

‘Blade Runner’ Prequel/Sequel Rights Acquired By Warner Bros
[1] Warner Bros-based Alcon Entertainment (the financing and production company behind The Blind Side and The Book of Eli) are in final discussions to secure film, television and ancillary franchise rights to produce prequels and sequels to Ridley Scott's iconic 1982 science-fiction film Blade Runner. Not many details are known about the situation, but we have been told the following: Alcon’s franchise rights would be all-inclusive, but exclude rights to remake the original. The Company, however, may produce projects based on situations introduced in the original film. The project would be distributed domestically by Warner Bros. International rights are yet to be determined. So don't expect to see a remake of the original movie. It is also unclear if they have any screenplay or treatments for possible projects. You might recall that Eagle Eye screenwriters Travis Wright and John Glenn were paid to explore a potential secret sequel [2] from 2003-
See full article at Slash Film »

Our Conversation with the Star of A Conversation with Edith Head

Photo by Pop Culture Passionistas

Costume designer extraordinaire, Edith Head, is alive and well and living in Burbank. At least, that is, through this weekend when the run of A Conversation with Edith Head, a one-woman show about the costumer, comes to an end. Susan Claassen has been bringing Head to life at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood since September 23. If you have not had a chance to see the show, call for tickets now, before it closes on October 24.

Claassen, an actress/writer/director/producer, began her journey with Edith Head nine years ago, when she was watching the Biography channel. She was astounded at the physical similarity she bore to the Hollywood legend and thought her story was fascinating. In a recent interview Susan told us, "That was the first impetus to explore the possibility."

After researching a bit and contacting the Motion Picture and Television Fund,
See full article at popculturepassionistas »

Lou Jacobi obituary

Character actor and comedian who specialised in Jewish roles

Portly, balding, twinkly-eyed and sporting a moustache, Lou Jacobi, who has died aged 95, believed that he "had the look of everybody's favourite Uncle Max". Although Jacobi had been acting since he was 12, he was the sort of character actor that one could never imagine being young. He was born in the Jewish section of Toronto, Canada, and started performing as a child in the Yiddish theatre in a play called The Rabbi and the Priest, in which he was a violin prodigy. He went on to specialise in Jewish roles, both comic and dramatic, lending them that particular intonation and body language of which he was a master.

In the 1940s, Jacobi worked as a stand- up comic at holiday resorts in Muskoka, north of Toronto, a vacation spot popular with Jewish holidaymakers. He was also cast in Spring Thaw (1949), which
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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