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Cleopatra (1963) Poster

(1963)

Trivia

A clerical error by 20th Century-Fox probably cost Roddy McDowall a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award nomination for his performance in this film. The studio erroneously listed him as a leading player rather than a supporting one. When Fox asked the Academy to correct the error, it refused, saying the ballots already were at the printer. Fox then published an open letter in the trade papers, apologizing to McDowall: "We feel that it is important that the industry realize that your electric performance as Octavian in 'Cleopatra,' which was unanimously singled out by the critics as one of the best supporting performances by an actor this year, is not eligible for an Academy Award nomination in that category . . . due to a regrettable error on the part of 20th Century-Fox."
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour 'director's cut' will be available.
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Adjusted for inflation, this is one of the most expensive movies ever made. Its budget of $44 million is equivalent to approximately $344 million in 2016 dollars.
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The scene showing Cleopatra's navy required huge numbers of boats and ships. It was said at the time that Twentieth Century-Fox had the world's third largest navy.
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The filming of Cleopatra's entrance into Rome was delayed for months due to lighting problems. The American child actor who played her four-year-old son got taller during the delay. He was replaced by an Italian boy, complete with a thick and inappropriate accent.
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In principle, Darryl F. Zanuck, did not object to Joseph L. Mankiewicz's idea to make two 3-hour movies. However, he knew the public was obsessed with the Elizabeth Taylor-Richard Burton affair, and would not show up for the first part, in which Burton did not appear. The two parts were edited into one movie.
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When the film finally broke even in 1973, 20th Century-Fox "closed the books" on "Cleopatra," keeping all future profits from this film secret to avoid paying those who might have been promised a percentage of the net profits.
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Elizabeth Taylor had met Richard Burton several years prior to their working together on the film, and had found him to be brutish and boorish. However, when Burton showed up for work on this film on his first day, it was with a hangover so severe that he had the shakes. Taylor had to help him around and administer to such basic needs as helping him drink a cup of coffee. This time, she found him to be very endearing.
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Director Joseph L. Mankiewicz was fired during post-production phase. Since there was no actual shooting script (Mankiewicz wrote as he was shooting), Twentieth Century-Fox soon realized that only Mankiewicz knew how the story fit together. He was brought back to complete the project.
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz was never proud of this film, and only stayed for his friend, Elizabeth Taylor. At one point he even tried to have his name taken off.
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This movie is widely, though inaccurately, regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually the highest-grossing film of 1964, making it and The Bible: In the Beginning... (1966) the only two movies to be the highest-grossing of their respective years yet still run at a loss. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record $5 million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the movie in the black. If if hadn't suffered all its false starts, re-shoots and delays, the film could have been brought in for less than half of what the studio ended up spending. If its final cost had been in the $15 million to $24 million range (which would have bought all the production value that did end up on screen), the film would have been enormously profitable. In the end, the film's production was a debacle because the studio did not prepare adequately). After all was said and done, the film's revenues from television and home video added to its theatrical grosses finally allowed it to turn a profit.
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Elizabeth Taylor's contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: $125,000 for 16 weeks work plus $50,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over $2 million. After a lengthy $50 million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was $7 million.
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The budget for Elizabeth Taylor's costumes, $194,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
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Cleopatra's barge alone cost about $2 million in today's dollars.
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When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
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Egypt initially refused to let Elizabeth Taylor in because she has converted to Judaism when she married Eddie Fisher. They changed their minds when they realized the film's presence would put millions of American dollars into the economy.
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While making of the movie, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton began a love-hate relationship, including being married and divorced twice, which lasted until his death.
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A group of female extras who played Cleopatra's servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras. This became known in the gossip press as "The Revolt of the Slave Girls."
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Cleopatra's entrance into Rome was nearly ruined when enthusiastic extras started shouting "Liz! Liz!" instead of "Cleopatra! Cleopatra!"
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Seventy-nine sets were constructed for the film, and 26,000 costumes were created.
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A clause in Rex Harrison's contract required a picture of him to appear in any ad with a picture of Richard Burton. When a large billboard showed only Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, Harrison's lawyers complained. The studio tried to fulfill the contract by placing a picture of Harrison in the lower left corner of the billboard. Harrison was not satisfied. A third version of the same billboard on the Seventh Avenue side of the Rivoli Theatre was created with Harrison standing on Taylor's right.
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz told Martin Landau that he had enough cut footage to make another movie called "The Further Adventures of Octavian and Rufio."
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The film has no big final battle sequence because the studio couldn't afford one.
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The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
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Joan Collins was cast in the title role in 1958, but after several delays she became unavailable. After Collins' departure, producer Walter Wanger considered Susan Hayward, Audrey Hepburn, and Sophia Loren as a replacement. Wanger then offered the role to Elizabeth Taylor. He called her on the set of her latest film, Suddenly, Last Summer (1959), and relayed the offer through Taylor's then-husband Eddie Fisher who had answered the phone. At first, Taylor rejected the offer, but when Wanger asked again, she thought about it some more and replied "Sure, tell him I'll do it for a million dollars." Wanger agreed on the deal, which shocked Taylor, herself, and Fox President Spyros A. Skouras. When the public expressed great interest in Taylor being cast as Cleopatra, Fox, then, sought out to hire her for the film. On October 15, 1959, Twentieth Century-Fox became the first studio ever to pay a star $1 million for a single role.
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In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
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The first of eleven theatrical films that Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton starred in together.
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Rex Harrison was one of director Joseph L. Mankiewicz's most passionate allies. At one point, Harrison offered up his own salary to help the production. Mankiewicz refused to let him do that.
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By the time Rouben Mamoulian was fired, he'd been on the film 16 weeks. Seven million dollars of production costs yielded 10 minutes of usable film.
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Martin Landau was booked to play Euphranor. When no one could be found to play Ruffo, Landau was recast.
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Elizabeth Taylor's life had been threatened after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Richard Burton. During the filming of the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras became a serious concern. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "bacio Liz!! Bacio Liz," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses, and the scene had to be re-shot.
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After firing Rouben Mamoulian as director, Walter Wanger and Darryl F. Zanuck approached Alfred Hitchcock to take over the project. Hitchcock refused and chose to make The Birds (1963) instead.
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In the five-plus-hour version Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 203-minute version, though there are hints throughout as to their relationship.
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Elizabeth Taylor demanded that the film be shot in the large, 70mm Todd-AO format system. She owned the rights to the system as the widow of the format system's creator: Mike Todd.
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After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn't allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
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During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome's hot climate.
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Elizabeth Taylor reputedly threw up the first time she saw the finished product.
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Elizabeth Taylor's overall take of $7 million is equivalent to approximately $54.9 million in 2016 dollars.
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Director Joseph L. Mankiewicz referred to this as "the toughest three pictures I ever made."
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When Walter Wanger's first choice for director insisted that Julius Caesar was gay, Fox chairman Spyros Skouras told the producer not to hire him. Skouras reasoned, "To hell with history. I want a triangle with two men and one woman. Having one of the greatest men in history as a homo isn't box office!"
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While filming the Battle of Actium off the Italian island of Ischia, a producer invited Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately, and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
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According to Rex Harrison's autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton's boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
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In order to keep star Elizabeth Taylor happy, Fox chairman Spyros Skouras had Los Angeles restaurant Chasen's famous Maude's Chili air-freighted to Italy for her.
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Marlon Brando was sought to reprise his role as Mark Antony in Julius Caesar (1953) but he was attached to Mutiny on the Bounty (1962).
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With the scandal surrounding the affair between Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film's three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance.
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John DeCuir rebuilt the massive set of Alexandria three times.
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During Cleopatra's entry into Rome, the shots of the entry of Cleopatra's giant sphinx, and the parade that precedes it, were filmed several months apart, posing problems in matching the lighting.
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Soon after shooting began in England, Elizabeth Taylor became ill and could not work. Her presence was required for almost every scene, and production soon closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments.
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz's first cut ran 5 hours and 20 minutes. Darryl F. Zanuck's first reaction was that Mark Antony was ineffectual, many of the scenes were too long and the battle scenes were amateurish.
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By June 6, the Italian shoot was spending nearly $70,000 per day, and the film cost $3 million dollars more than Ben-Hur (1959).
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The film's initial North American box-office take was $48 million, the highest-grossing film of the year. Fox's share of the receipts was $26 million, half of the total production costs. The film eventually recouped its budget through worldwide box office receipts and television sales, but the studio had to cut costs drastically to survive. the studio managed to stay afloat with the success of The Longest Day (1962). Twentieth Century-Fox then invested in the The Sound of Music (1965), which became the most financially successful film ever at that time, turning the studio's finances around.
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Production moved from London to Rome following Elizabeth Taylor's illness, and the film's elaborate sets and props all had to be constructed twice. The production required so much lumber and raw material that building materials became scarce throughout Italy.
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Twentieth Century-Fox was in financial trouble in the late 1950s due to disappointing box-office returns of some major releases. Orders were given to search the Fox script library for a proven property that could be remade. The project chosen was Cleopatra (1917), a Theda Bara film that had been a smash hit for the studio. With no surviving prints, they based their judgment on an archived copy of the original script and some stills from the production. Then the studio needed a producer willing to handle the project. At the same time, veteran producer Walter Wanger approached Twentieth Century-Fox with an idea for a project he'd been planning for several years: the story of Cleopatra. In the words of David Brown, "We fell on him."
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Elizabeth Taylor's contract gave her director approval. When Rouben Mamoulian resigned, Taylor would only approve two possible replacements: George Stevens and Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Stevens was already at work on The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965).
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When the historical Cleopatra, the last of the Ptolemaic dynasty, killed herself with a cobra bite, Egypt became a province of Rome.
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At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
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Twentieth Century-Fox decided to make "Cleopatra" in mid-1959. Once Walter Wanger came on board as producer, Spyros Skouras, then-president of the studio after Darryl F. Zanuck's departure, ordered the film to be made on a $300,000 budget and allowed six weeks to write the script and find a director, as well as four months to shoot. The plan was then to rush the film to theaters as soon as possible. Wanger was also forced to cast the title role from among the Fox contract actresses. The producer was appalled by what Skouras demanded and protested; he had dreamed of making a film about Cleopatra for years, and didn't want the project to turn into another "sword and sandal quickie." Wanger, then, hired Academy Award-winning production designer John DeCuir (The King and I (1956)) to create exotic, romantic concept sketches and models for presentation to Fox executives. Thanks to his spectacular display of inter corporate salesmanship, Wanger showed the executives, essentially, what they could have if they opened their minds. Where he saw beauty and vision in the film, Fox executives saw the possibility for bigger profits. As a result, the film was no longer considered a B-movie project; the budget had been increased to nearly $5 million and bigger stars would now be considered for the titular role. Susan Hayward, Audrey Hepburn, and Sophia Loren were initially considered, but Wanger had another star in mind: Elizabeth Taylor.
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Elizabeth Taylor had 65 costume changes for this film, a record for a motion picture. Joan Collins broke that record in 1986, with 85 costume changes in the TV miniseries Sins (1986).
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While filming Cleopatra's entry into Rome, a scene requiring thousands of extras and the pulling of a huge sphinx carrying the Queen of Egypt and her son between its paws, Joseph L. Mankiewicz a master shot was spoiled because the camera caught an enterprising extra hawking gelato to his fellow extras.
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Filming began in 1960.
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted to have either Laurence Olivier or Trevor Howard as Julius Caesar. Olivier was running the National Theatre of Great Britain, and Howard was caught up in the protracted filming of Mutiny on the Bounty (1962).
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This film has been cited as one factor that ended the Italian-made "sword and sandal" epics that had been popular since the late 1950s. Specialized suppliers raised their prices for goods and services supplied to this production. The higher prices were beyond the budget of Italian producers, so production values for their films dropped, and audiences declined.
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When Joseph L. Mankiewicz came on board as director after the departure of Rouben Mamoulian, he inherited a film that was already $7 million over budget and with only ten usable minutes of footage to show for it -- and those ten minutes would not be used in the finished film!
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The finished script was as thick as the Beverly Hills phonebook.
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Martin Landau was cast after Joseph L. Mankiewicz admired his performance in North by Northwest (1959). Mankiewicz called up Alfred Hitchcock to ask him if he could act.
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Martin Landau learned Italian during the shoot.
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When producer Walter Wanger was removed from the production, it ended his movie career.
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Ten people (7 art directors, 3 set decorators) won the Academy Award for Best Art Direction (Color). It remains the largest number of people sharing a single award in an annual category. In 1988 and 2006, 12 people shared a Scientific and Technical Award, which is not necessarily given each year.
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Hume Cronyn was originally signed to be on the film for 10 weeks. He stayed with the production for 10 1/2 months.
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Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
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Robert Stephens said in a radio interview that most of his part was deleted from the final print.
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When the Marilyn Monroe vehicle Something's Got to Give (1962) was shelved due to budget overruns and an unreliable star, this film became the only one in production at Twentieth Century-Fox.
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Among the many scenes that were cut in the 194 minute version, was Cleopatra using Egyptian gold to bribe Roman senators into inviting her and Caesar to Rome.
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When it seemed like Elizabeth Taylor wouldn't recover from her illness, Audrey Hepburn was considered to replace her.
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Elizabeth Taylor said of the finished, 192-minute film, "They had cut out the heart, the essence, the motivations, the very core, and tacked on all those battle scenes. It should have been about three large people, but it lacked reality and passion. I found it vulgar."
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Millions of dollars' worth of props and other equipment were stolen by studio employees.
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Alex North was chosen to score the film after Joseph L. Mankiewicz's son Christopher Mankiewicz told him that North had done a magnificent job in composing the score for Spartacus (1960).
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The dragged-out production cost Martin Landau a part in Federico Fellini's (1963).
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Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox's The Longest Day (1962) purely to relieve the boredom and nightmares of this film's production.
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The original list of choices for the role of Mark Antony was: Stephen Boyd, Richard Johnson, Michael David, Peter O'Toole, Peter Finch and Laurence Harvey. Boyd was cast as Antony while Finch was cast as Caesar. Both men, however, had to leave the project due to the lengthy delays, many creative differences with the film's initial director, Rouben Mamoulian, and their obligations to other projects.
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Brigitte Bardot, Joan Collins, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Collins and Woodward were the only ones of the aforementioned actresses to do a screen test.
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Originally "Cleopatra" was envisioned as a modest $2,000,000 project starring Joan Collins.
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One of Cleopatra's handmaidens is a 16-year-old Francesca Annis.
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The blistering review that Judith Crist gave the film effectively kickstarted her film critic career.
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Darryl F. Zanuck was still a stockholder in Fox and became convinced that the film would destroy the studio. Fox's problems nearly led to the studio taking over the editing of The Longest Day (1962), which Zanuck was producing, in order to increase the number of shows per day and make an even bigger profit. When Zanuck heard of this, that was the last straw; he staged a board-room takeover of the studio and won. As a result, Spyros A. Skouras was ousted from Fox and Zanuck took over. The Longest Day (1962) was saved.
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The financial failure of the film was a key factor in the disintegration of the old "studio system," as studios passed responsibility for production costs to independent production companies instead of handling said costs themselves. The old "studio system" would later be resurrected with the release of Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977), which is another Twentieth Century-Fox production.
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British author Lawrence Durrell adapted the script, but none of his material ended up on screen.
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During production, Twentieth Century-Fox chairman Spyros Skouras sold 1000 of his estimated 100,000 shares in the studio on a whim. When rumors of his lack of faith in the studio began to spread, he bought them back to quash the rumors.
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Richard Burton presented two of the swords he used during filming to Frankie Howerd. The comedian thereafter kept them by his fireplace at home.
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Stanley Baker was set to play Rufio but demurred over taking the part because there was no script available. By the time he decided to take it, the part had gone to Martin Landau.
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Nunnally Johnson was paid $140,000 for a script polish. As Rouben Mamoulian, the film's original director, insisted only on his original screenwriter, there was nothing for Johnson to do, except to receive his paycheck and cash it in.
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After Julius Caesar (1953), this was the second film directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz to feature Julius Caesar and Mark Antony as major characters.
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When Milton Berle was asked if he'd seen the film yet, his reply was "I never miss a Hume Cronyn picture!"
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The nightmarish experience of filming Cleopatra (1963), combined with the film's financial losses, virtually destroyed the careers and reputations of director Joseph L. Mankiewicz and producer Walter Wanger.
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After the departure of the original director, Rouben Mamoulian, Elizabeth Taylor insisted that either George Stevens or Joseph L. Mankiewicz to be brought in as director. Stevens was unavailable, due to his commitment on The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965). Fox, then, pressured Mankiewicz in taking the job, which he eventually accepted after turning down the offer a couple of times before.
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The asp used for the finale scene was not venom free.
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The blame for the incredible troubled production, accelerated production costs, and massive financial failure of Cleopatra (1963) can be pointed at the following: (1) the studio's initial insistence that the film should be made on a B-movie budget; (2) the studio's initial decision for the film to be shot at Pinewood Studios in England, which resulted in endless array of bad weather, deteriorating sets, and Elizabeth Taylor's health problems which resulted in pneumonia; (3) Fox President Spyros A. Skouras and producer Walter Wanger's first decision on Rouben Mamoulian as director, which resulted in many creative differences between Mamoulian and Taylor, Peter Finch, and Stephen Boyd, as well as his inability to handle the production's problems; (4) Fox's endless rejections to give Joseph L. Mankiewicz more time to write and refine the script, as the studio was very anxious to get the film made and finished immediately; (5) the low quantity of cash Fox could afford to pay for the ever-growing production expanses of Cleopatra, due to the studio's financial problems; (6) Elizabeth Taylor's prima donna behavior all throughout the production; (7) the Elizabeth Taylor-Richard Burton affair and its surrounding media frenzy; (8) Spyros A. Skouras' selfish preferences and inexperienced micromanagement on the film's production. Not even his showmanship made up for his considerable lack of filmmaking in speeding up production on Cleopatra; and (9) Darryl F. Zanuck's ultimate decision to reject Mankiewicz' proposal to present Cleopatra as two separate, three-hour pictures (to preserve all of the useable footage) and to present the film as a one whole, edited picture, in order to capitalize on the Taylor-Burton affair.
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After Cleopatra (1934), this was the second film based on the life of Cleopatra VII to receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture.
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Filming finally finished at Cinecitta Studios on March 6th 1963, where production had begun a full two and a half years earlier. The aftermath of the Battle of Pharsalia, was then filmed in Almeria, Spain, with Rex Harrison and Roddy McDowall when it was agreed that the story would be hobbled without that scene to open the film. The world premiere was held on June 12th in New York less than three months later.
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When Joseph L. Mankiewicz was tapped to direct, he was working on adapting Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet novels for filming. One of his demands of the studio is that it purchase his production company, Figaro Productions, and all its assets. One of Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet novels, Justine, was ultimately filmed by 20th Century-Fox with George Cukor as director.
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The first screenwriter drafted in on the film was industry veteran Nigel Balchin.
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The January, 1988 copy of "Films in Review" by James Beuselink contains a 16 page article entitled "Mankiewicz's Cleopatra."
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Michael Hordern said on a chat show he was under contract for 18 months.
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During the shooting in Italy, Prince Borghese rented his private beach for $150,000, but the place was still full of mines left over from the Allied landing in WWII.
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The saving grace to the fortunes and legacy of Twentieth Century-Fox, after Cleopatra (1963), came from the phenomenal success of The Sound of Music (1965), an expensive and handsomely produced film adaptation of the highly acclaimed Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical. It became one of the all-time greatest box office hits and went on to win five Academy Awards, including Best Director and Best Picture of the Year.
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In the restored scene where Cleopatra and Caesar visit Alexander the Great's tomb, the backdrop is the famous image of Alexander's battle with Darius of Persia. It is best known as a large floor mosaic discovered in the ruins of Pompeii, and is said to be based on a 3rd Century BCE Hellenistic painting. There is no evidence the image was ever located in Alexandria, though it did exist before the time in which this movie is set, and so is historically reasonable.
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In the book about the making of this film, Producer Walter Wanger says that Rouben Mamoulian - the first director, before the arrival of Joseph Mankiewicz - refused to discuss business during meal times.
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One of Richard Burton's costumes was later worn by Sidney James in Carry on Cleo (1964), which is a parody of this film. Both Burton and James played Mark Antony.
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When production relocated to Rome, the costumes and sets had to be completely re-designed and re-built, leading to a shortage of lumber and other building materials throughout Italy.
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Leon Shamroy was unavailable for many of the re-shoots, so Claude Renoir filled in.
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By June 6 of the Italian shoot spending was nearly $70,000 per day and the film was already $3 million dollars more expensive than Ben Hur.
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Out of desperation, Twentieth Century-Fox orchestrated an unmounted Academy Awards campaign for Cleopatra (1963), in hopes that the film's success at the Academy Awards would result in bigger and improved profits, which would help the ailing studio. While the film ultimately received nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, that did nothing to improve the film's box office receipts.
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Actors arrived from all over the world every day, and most of them were not met at the plane because of major transportation problems. According to the producer Walter Wanger, the housing department neglected to get the right accommodations, which made for even more chaos.
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Athough she never asked it, Elizabeth Taylor had an entire building converted to her own use. It included an office for her husband, a salon, a special room for her wigs, a dressing room, a make-up room with bath tub and shower.
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The film of the slapping scene was damaged in transit back to the USA and had to be shot over again. This can of film apparently was stowed on the plane near something that fogged it.
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While the studio executives decided to stop the shooting because of the gigantic expenses, the whole crew, from actors to technicians and even extras, made large personal concessions in time and salary to finish the film properly.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
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Michael Hordern describes the filming of the 9-minute sequence where Cleopatra enters Rome in his 1994 autobiography. He remembers that the doves that were supposed to fly out of the miniature pyramid when it opened had grown very drowsy in the Roman heat and remained inside, so a crew member had to hide inside to shoo them out at the right moment, not a pleasant job as the birds defecated liberally.
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The only Best Picture Oscar nominee that year not to be nominated in any of the writing categories.
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The only Best Picture Oscar nominee that year to be also nominated for Best Special Effects.
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Widely misrembered as being a box office bomb in its initial release, Cleopatra was actually 1963's biggest money-maker, returning more than $22 million to 20th Century-Fox. The problem was that, when all the dust settled, it had cost nearly twice what it grossed (reportedly over $43 million). It would take decades for this film to "break even" (make back what it cost) but it was said to have done so when it was first released on home video in the late 1980s.
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John Alderton's movie debut.
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Jack Hildyard was initially the film's cinematographer, but left at the same time as original director Rouben Mamoulian. When Joseph L. Mankiewicz came on board, he initially looked at hiring an Italian cinematographer, but the studio did not believe that there were any Italians sufficiently qualified to work on the film and pressured him to hire an American or British cinematographer. Freddie Young, Milton R. Krasner and Robert Surtees were all unsuccessfully approached for the position, before Leon Shamroy finally agreed to sign on.
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Ancient Egyptian obelisks in New York's Central Park and London are each known as Cleopatra's Needle.
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Elizabeth Taylor was not insured during the shooting, because of her numerous health problems. Walter Wanger, the Producer, said that they -- the producers -- had to be careful with her, since she was in the vast majority of the film, and any health issues on her part would wreak havoc with the schedule.
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"The biggest asp-disaster in the world" (a critic).
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At the time this was released, major film studios were still in the habit of "encouraging" their thousands of employees to block vote for each company's biggest-budgeted films for Best Picture (the only category voted on by all Academy members in all branches). This may explain why this elephantine budgeted film is among the few ever to be nominated for the top Oscar, but fail to be recognized for either its writing or directing.
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