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Review: "Blame It On Rio" (1984) Starring Michael Caine, Joseph Bologna And Michelle Johnson; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

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The 1980s were a decade of many cultural phenomenon such as the teen angst film, the splatter horror film, the zombie films, and of course the teen sex comedy. Bob Clark’s Porky’s (1981) was a huge success both financially and artistically. To this day it’s still one of the funniest movies ever made. Many of today’s best-known actors cut their teeth in such fare: Tom Hanks attended an out-of-control Bachelor Party (1984) and even Johnny Depp and Rob Morrow checked into a Private Resort (1985). Stanley Donen, best known for directing Singin’ in the Rain (1952), Funny Face (1957), Charade (1963), and Arabesque (1966), followed up the boring and disastrous Saturn 3 (1980) with Blame It on Rio, a peculiar entry in his otherwise illustrious career. Jennifer (Michelle Johnson) is a pulchritudinous seventeen-year-old who lusts after her father Victor’s (Joseph Bologna) best friend
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn return in Charade at Cineplex theatres!

  • Cineplex
Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn return in Charade at Cineplex theatres!Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn return in Charade at Cineplex theatres!Ingrid Randoja - Cineplex Magazine1/24/2018 10:23:00 Am Cary Grant did not want to work with Audrey Hepburn.

It wasn’t personal. The 59-year-old actor admired Hepburn, but when director Stanley Donen offered him the romantic male lead in Charade (1963) opposite 33-year-old Hepburn he turned it down. He felt their 26-year age difference was too great and audiences would find it unseemly.

He eventually agreed to star with the condition screenwriter Peter Stone address the issue by changing the script so Hepburn takes the lead in the couple’s budding romance.

The result is a topsy-turvy crime thriller set in Paris that casts Hepburn as Reggie Lampert, whose dead husband stole gold bars during World War II. Pursued by three thugs who believe Reggie knows where the gold is hidden,
See full article at Cineplex »

Review: "Father Goose" (1964) Starring Cary Grant And Leslie Caron; Olive Films Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Cary Grant was one of the few actors to defy the effects of aging. The older he got, the more popular his films became. By the late 1950s Grant had become uncomfortable making movies because he realized audiences only wanted to see him as a romantic lead and he felt self-conscious about studio insistence that he be seen on screen romancing female leads who were often decades younger than him. Nonetheless, Grant kept forestalling his frequent vows to retire from acting. He had taken much more control over his career by forming his own production company and the result were some of the biggest hits of his career ("Operation Petticoat", "That Touch of Mink", "Charade"). Grant's primary motivation for not retiring was his desire- or rather, obsession- with winning an Oscar. Alfred Hitchcock had advised him that the best way to do so was to get away
See full article at CinemaRetro »

10 Great Directors Who Should Make Horror Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey

10 Great Directors Who Should Make Horror Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What filmmaker would you most like to see try their hand at a horror movie?

Kristy Puchko (@KristyPuchko), Pajiba/Riot Material

I struggled with this question, because a lot of the directors I have adored have worked in horror, be it Tim Burton (“Beetlejuice,” “Edward Scissorhands”), Robert Zemeckis (“Death Becomes Her”), Edgar Wright (“Shawn of the Dead”), Frank Oz (“Little Shop of Horror”), Guillermo del Toro (“Crimson Peak”), Bong-Joon Ho (“The Host”), Jim Jarmusch (“Only Lovers Left Alive”), or Taika Waititi (“What We Do In the Shadows”). Part of what I love about the genre is the way is can be reshaped with vision, color,
See full article at Indiewire »

50th Anniversary: Two for the Road

Tim here. This week marks the fiftieth anniversary of one of the tiny gems in the careers of Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney, and director Stanley Donen: Two for the Road. It's a British film that picked up a handful of important awards nominations – writer Frederic Raphael at both the Oscars and Baftas, Hepburn at the Golden Globes, Donen with the DGA – and went on to be largely overlooked in the following five decades.

That's understandable; it's not a film primed to appeal to the fandom that it seems like it should have. Donen in the director's seat and Hepburn as the top-billed lead both suggest certain kinds of films, if not necessarily the same kind of film: bubbly comedies in his case, elegant Continental romances in hers (splitting the difference, four years earlier they collaborated on Charade, a bubbly Continental comedy). Two for the Road isn't devoid of humor,
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Forgotten: Stanley Donen's "Arabesque" (1966)

  • MUBI
In a sense, Arabesque (1966) is a sort of warmed-over rehash of Donen's earlier Charade (1963), which was a really nifty mock-Hitchcockian comedy thriller with Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant. The later film stars Gregory Peck, who's no Grant, and Sophia Loren, who isn't Hepburn but is Loren—which ain't nothing.Donen was reputedly highly unhappy with the script, despite being the movie's producer, and his cinematographer Christopher Challis records him saying that their only hope was to present the story in as stylish and eccentric a manner as possible: this, for the most part, they do. (A pretty-well identical tale is told of Sidney J. Furie and The Ipcress File, and the result is similar in each case: a pop-art expressionist fairyland London in which everyone is or might be a spy or double or treble agent.)The opening scene, in which George Coulouris is murdered at the optician with poisoned eyedrops,
See full article at MUBI »

From Lollobrigida to Gidget: Romance and Heartache in Italy

Here's a brief look – to be expanded – at Turner Classic Movies' June 2017 European Vacation Movie Series this evening, June 23. Tonight's destination of choice is Italy. Starring Suzanne Pleshette and Troy Donahue as the opposite of Ugly Americans who find romance and heartbreak in the Italian capital, Delmer Daves' Rome Adventure (1962) was one of the key romantic movies of the 1960s. Angie Dickinson and Rossano Brazzi co-star. In all, Rome Adventure is the sort of movie that should please fans of Daves' Technicolor melodramas like A Summer Place, Parrish, and Susan Slade. Fans of his poetic Westerns – e.g., 3:10 to Yuma, The Hanging Tree – may (or may not) be disappointed with this particular Daves effort. As an aside, Rome Adventure was, for whatever reason, a sizable hit in … Brazil. Who knows, maybe that's why Rome Adventure co-star Brazzi would find himself playing a Brazilian – a macho, traditionalist coffee plantation owner,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Hospital Massacre aka X-ray (1981)

So you’re wading through piles of slasher films from the ‘80s, keen on discovering a lost gem far removed from the normal gang in the woods or high school sis-boom-bah stab and gab. You’re thinking maybe a different setting will yield a fresh take, already tired tropes blurring your vision and making the distinction between a hockey mask and a fencing one harder by the day. Well…have you tried the hospital yet? Most folks are terrified of the antiseptic halls and robotic empathy doled out by uncaring staff. (Yes, yes, they also save lives, I know. I’m trying to set a mood, dammit.) And if you do decide to enter the medical field, I strongly suggest you pay a visit to Hospital Massacre (1981), Israeli King of Schlock Boaz Davidson’s wild attempt at a horror comedy, where some of the humor is even intentional.

First released
See full article at DailyDead »

How to Steal a Million

William Wyler’s 1960s screwball heist comedy is a squeaky-clean high fashion vehicle for stars Audrey Hepburn and Peter O’Toole — who of course aren’t really crooks despite pulling off a major art theft. It’s lush, beautiful to look at and directed with verve by Wyler; with some funny jabs at the art world from screenwriter Harry Kurnitz.

How to Steal a Million

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1966 / Color / 1:35 widescreen / 123 min. / Street Date April 11, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Audrey Hepburn, Peter O’Toole, Charles Boyer, Eli Wallach, Hugh Griffith, Fernand Gravey, Marcel Dalio, Jacques Marin. .

Cinematography: Charles Lang

Film Editor: Robert Swink

Original Music: John Williams

Production design: Alexander Trauner

Written by Harry Kurnitz story by George Bradshaw

Produced by Fred Kohlmar

Directed by William Wyler

There’s no denying that Audrey Hepburn had a fairly incredible run of hits in the 1960s: The Nun’s Story,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs’ Director, Dies at 73

Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs’ Director, Dies at 73
Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme died Wednesday in New York of cancer complications, his publicist told Variety. He was 73 years old.

Demme is best known for directing “The Silence of the Lambs,” the 1991 horror-thriller that was a box office smash, a critical triumph, and introduced moviegoers to Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal Lecter, a charismatic serial with a yen for Chianti, fava beans, and cannibalism. The story of a novice FBI analyst (Jodie Foster) on the trail of a murderer became only the third film in history to win Academy Awards in all the top five categories ( picture, actor, actress, director, and adapted screenplay), joining the ranks of “It Happened One Night” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Though he had his greatest success terrifying audiences, most of Demme’s work was looser and quirkier. In particular, he showed a great humanism and an empathy for outsiders in the likes of “Melvin and Howard,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wait Until Dark

Is this a genuine classic? I think so. Sure, it’s the old story of the blind girl in jeopardy, but it’s been worked out so well. Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna and Jack Weston shine in a keen adaptation of Frederick Knott’s play, which could be titled, Dial C for Can’t See Nuthin’.

Wait Until Dark

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1967 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 108 min. / Street Date January 24, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna, Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Jack Weston, Julie Herrod, Samantha Jones.

Cinematography Charles Lang

Art Direction George Jenkins

Film Editor Gene Milford

Original Music Henry Mancini

Written by Robert Howard-Carrington & Jane Howard-Carrington

from the play by Frederick Knott

Produced by Mel Ferrer

Directed by Terence Young

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This old-fashioned, semi- stage bound thriller is a real keeper: I must have seen it six times
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Getting on the train by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Recycled Orchestra of Cateura at the United Nations Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In Robert Altman's The Player, Tim Robbins (as Griffin Mill) walks on the street at night, in Pasadena, past Megadeth posters pasted on the wall signalling a significant event to come in the film. In Brad Allgood and Graham Townsley's Landfill Harmonic, co-directed by Juliana Peñaranda-Loftus and co-produced with Alejandra Amarilla, we see the flag of Paraguay painted with the name Megadeth by members of the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura doing the trick to bring David Ellefson, Dave Mustaine, Shawn Drover, and Chris Broderick to perform with them Symphony Of Destruction.

Favio Chávez: "There are events that happen that build a story." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Cary Grant in Alfred Hitchcock's North By Northwest, Nicole Kidman in Sydney Pollack's The Interpreter, and Audrey Hepburn in Stanley Donen's Charade as a Un interpreter came to
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The 10 Best Opening Title Sequences in Film

  • Cinelinx
Title sequences don’t have to be boring. They can be just as exciting, creative, or innovative as the films they introduce. These are our picks for the 10 best opening title sequences of feature films.

Spring is upon us, and what better way to celebrate the beginning of brighter days than to celebrate the best film beginnings of all time! Check back all month long as we look at the films with the best beginnings.

The title sequence for a film is more than a bunch of letters spelling words on a screen. A title sequence is an opportunity for a filmmaker to grab the attention of his or her audience. It’s an ideal spot to introduce musical themes, set a stylistic tone, or establish a directorial style. During the opening titles a filmmaker has the opportunity to explain a backstory, show a flashback, or even dictate the setting to the audience.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Why film editor Jim Clark was Hollywood’s greatest repairman

He completely recut Midnight Cowboy, won an Oscar for The Killing Fields and worked on James Bond. William Boyd remembers the film editor they called Dr Clark, because he could make sick movies well again

One of the many adages that circulate in the movie business is that every film is made three times: once when it is written, once when it is shot and once, finally, when it is edited. Like many an old saw it is true, but I believe that it is a truth that can only really be recognised by people who have been physically involved in the making of a film. I don’t think audiences, or film critics or film theorists, for that matter, have any real idea of how a film can be totally reshaped and reinvented in the cutting room. As a film-maker, you hope that the editing process is merely an
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jim Clark, Oscar-Winning Editor of ‘The Killing Fields,’ Dies at 84

Jim Clark, who won an Oscar for editing Roland Joffé’s “The Killing Fields” and was also nominated for his work on the director’s film “The Mission,” died in the U.K. on Feb. 25. He was 84 and had been ill for some time.

News of his death was announced by the Guild of British Film and TV Editors on Feb. 26.

His credits also include Stanley Donen’s “Charade” (1963); John Schlesinger’s “Darling” (1965), “The Day of the Locust” (1975) and “Marathon Man” (1976); Michael Apted’s “Agatha” (1979), “Nell” (1994) and Bond film “The World Is Not Enough”; Michael Caton-Jones’ “Memphis Belle” (1990) and “City by the Sea” (2002); and Mike Leigh’s “Vera Drake” (2004) and “Happy-Go-Lucky” (2008).

In addition to the Schlesinger films listed above, he did uncredited work on the director’s “Far From the Madding Crowd” and served as a creative consultant on the helmer’s 1969 classic “Midnight Cowboy.”

Clark received the American Cinema
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Winner George Kennedy Dead At Age 91

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Oscar winning actor George Kennedy has died at age 91, five months after the passing of his wife Joan. Kennedy's popularity as a character actor led to eventual leading man roles in major films. Born in New York City, he experienced stage life early, working with his parents in Vaudeville. During WWII he served under General Patton and was decorated for bravery. He drifted into acting on television in the 1950s. With his imposing physical presence (he was 6'4"), Kennedy immediately found work, generally playing heavies who squared off against the series' heroes. Among the shows he guest-starred on were such hits as "Have Gun, Will Travel", "Rawhide", "Gunsmoke" and "The Untouchables". He crossed into feature films in the early 1960s and first made a splash in Stanley Donen's 1963 comedy thriller "Charade" in which he played a crook with a hook hand who attempts to kill Cary Grant in a rooftop fight.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

George Kennedy obituary

Actor known for his roles in Cool Hand Luke, the Naked Gun trilogy and Airport

George Kennedy, who has died aged 91, was known mainly for three movie roles, each of which represented a different aspect of his career: as heavy, hero and clown. They were the bullying convict Dragline in Cool Hand Luke (1967) – for which he won the Oscar for best supporting actor – aviation expert Joe Patroni in the Airport series of disaster movies from the 1970s, and Captain Ed Hocken, the none-too-bright sidekick of bumbling cop Frank Drebin (Leslie Nielsen) in the spoof Naked Gun trilogy (1988-94).

In the early to mid-60s, the tall, bulky Kennedy (he was 6ft 4in) appeared as bad guys in dozens of TV western series such as Rawhide, Gunsmoke and Bonanza. In films, he continued in the same vein, as the sadistic jailhouse guard who beats up Kirk Douglas in Lonely Are the Brave
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

George Kennedy obituary

Actor known for his roles in Cool Hand Luke, the Naked Gun trilogy and Airport

George Kennedy, who has died aged 91, was known mainly for three movie roles, each of which represented a different aspect of his career: as heavy, hero and clown. They were the bullying convict Dragline in Cool Hand Luke (1967) – for which he won the Oscar for best supporting actor – aviation expert Joe Patroni in the Airport series of disaster movies from the 1970s, and Captain Ed Hocken, the none-too-bright sidekick of bumbling cop Frank Drebin (Leslie Nielsen) in the spoof Naked Gun trilogy (1988-94).

In the early to mid-60s, the tall, bulky Kennedy (he was 6ft 4in) appeared as bad guys in dozens of TV western series such as Rawhide, Gunsmoke and Bonanza. In films, he continued in the same vein, as the sadistic jailhouse guard who beats up Kirk Douglas in Lonely Are the Brave
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film News: Character Actor, Oscar Winner George Kennedy Dies at 91

Middleton, Idaho – On the day of the 88th Academy Awards, Hollywood lost a venerable character actor and Oscar winner, George Kennedy. Kennedy won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar at the 40th Academy Awards for his role in “Cool Hand Luke.” He passed away at a care facility in Idaho, age 91.

George Kennedy in 2010

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

George Harris Kennedy was born in New York City in 1925. He parlayed a military career that began during World War II into a technical advisor role for “The Phil Silvers Show” in the late 1950s. Encourage by Silvers to begin acting, he made his debut in the film “Little Shepard of Kingdom Come” (1961). The beefy, solid character actor made numerous TV and film appearances, including “Charade” (1963), “Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte” (1964) and “The Dirty Dozen” (1967).

It was in 1967 that he won the role of “Dragline” opposite Paul Newman in “Cool Hand Luke.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Tough-Guy Actor George Kennedy Dead at 91

  • Moviefone
By Lindsey Bahr, AP Film Writer

Los Angeles (AP) -- George Kennedy, the hulking, tough-guy character actor who won an Academy Award for his portrayal of a savage chain-gang convict in the 1960s classic "Cool Hand Luke," has died.

His grandson Cory Schenkel says Kennedy died on Sunday morning of old age in Boise, Idaho. He was 91.

He had undergone emergency triple bypass surgery in 2002. That same year, he and his late wife moved to Idaho to be closer to their daughter and her family, though he still was involved in occasional film projects.

His biggest acting achievement came in "Cool Hand Luke," a 1967 film about a rebellious war hero played by Paul Newman who is bent on bucking the system as a prisoner on a Southern chain gang. Its theme of rebelling against authority and the establishment helped make it one of the most important films of the tumultuous 1960s.
See full article at Moviefone »
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