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The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962)

The story of Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm, and three of their stories...

Directors:

Henry Levin, George Pal

Writers:

David P. Harmon (screenplay), Charles Beaumont (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Laurence Harvey ... Wilhelm Grimm / The Cobbler ('The Cobbler and the Elves')
Karlheinz Böhm ... Jacob Grimm (as Karl Boehm)
Claire Bloom ... Dorothea Grimm
Walter Slezak ... Stossel
Barbara Eden ... Greta Heinrich
Oskar Homolka ... The Duke (as Oscar Homolka)
Arnold Stang ... Rumpelstiltskin
Martita Hunt ... Anna Richter (Story Teller)
Betty Garde ... Miss Bettenhausen
Bryan Russell ... Freidrich Grimm
Ian Wolfe ... Gruber
Tammy Marihugh ... Pauline Grimm
Cheerio Meredith Cheerio Meredith ... Mrs. Von Dittersdorf
Walter Rilla ... Priest
Yvette Mimieux ... The Princess ('The Dancing Princess')
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Storyline

The fictionalized lives of the story-telling Grimm brothers are brought to life in this all-star fantasy film. In the early nineteenth century, the brothers Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm are commissioned to write a family history for a local Duke. Reenactments of three of their stories including "The Dancing Princess", "The Cobbler and the Elves" and "The Singing Bone". Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Now Cinerama Tells a Story! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 July 1963 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

El maravilloso mundo de los hermanos Grimm See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$14,170,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Cinerama 7-Track | Mono (Westrex Recording System) (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.59 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the original version of The Singing Bone, the killer and his victim are a pair of brothers who set out to find and kill a dragon. In the movie version, they were made into a knight and his squire who fight a dragon so as to avoid having Terry-Thomas's character commit fratricide. See more »

Goofs

During The Dancing Princess on the return trip to the castle the carriage crosses a rickety wooden bridge that is not only too narrow for the two horse drawn carriage but also has several missing boards that the horses couldn't have missed resulting in hoofs falling through at the very least they simply couldn't have crossed that bridge. See more »

Quotes

The King: I have discovered a new musical instrument which I thought might amuse you.
Ludwig: As ruler of half your kingdom, I think it my duty to tell you that I simply loathe music.
The King: [Pointedly] As ruler of the other half, I suspect that you may change your mind. Shepherd, would you play us a tune?
Voice of Flute: [the Shepherd plays and this song is heard] O King, pray listen to my tale./ I sleep beneath the tree./ My master Ludwig raised his sword/ And drove it into me./ I'll never walk the earth again/ Or hear a bird or plant...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

At the end, the credits simply say: "And they lived happily ever after". There is no "The End" credit or "Cast of Characters". See more »

Alternate Versions

The current version shown on Turner Classic Movies is the full-length version, not seen since the film's 1962 roadshow release, not even on television. Not only does it include an Overture, Entr'acte and Exit Music; it also includes the long-unseen two-minute prologue to the main title. After we see the M-G-M lion roaring and the words "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Cinerama present a George Pal Production", the scene changes to show two armies firing off cannon furiously, while the announcer says, "Once again, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, Europe was torn by the sounds of war. However, if you listen very closely, you might hear another, very different sound". The camera then pans into the horizon while we hear the soft sounds of quill pens writing on paper. The scene then switches to show Laurence Harvey and Karl Boehm writing busily as the credits come up onscreen. See more »

Connections

Featured in Hail to the King - A King named Kong (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

The Singing Bone
Music by Bob Merrill
Words by Charles Beaumont
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User Reviews

 
Restore this gem on DVD, PLEASE!
24 June 2005 | by randigoSee all my reviews

Maybe it's because I grew up with this movie, and am stuck in that age, but I have always found this to be a special and magical movie experience. It was especially so on the big screen when I was 6 years old. We also had the soundtrack box edition on vinyl. So, I rated this movie highly, because I feel it truly was perfection (especially for its day), and needs to be re-discovered by families, and the young-at-heart everywhere. I hate clichés, but they just do not make them like this anymore. This gem should be restored in its full glory, and preserved and brought back to life. Hope you get to enjoy it someday.


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