To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) - News Poster

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Harper Lee Estate Sues over “To Kill a Mockingbird” Broadway Version

The estate of Harper Lee, the author of To Kill A Mockingbird, is suing the creator the Broadway version for not adhering to the story as was agreed upon apparently. Aaron Sorkin, the screenwriter of the play, has contended that there isn’t time or room enough to make the kind of changes that were spoken of after he presented the script to Lee, who disapproved of the changes that were made to the story. So far there hasn’t been any resolution as both sides are holding firm to their stories, but the play is set to come out in December

Harper Lee Estate Sues over “To Kill a Mockingbird” Broadway Version
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Aaron Sorkin’s Broadway Version of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Sued by Harper Lee Estate

What happens when you rewrite a classic piece of literature? In the case of To Kill a Mockingbird, you might get sued. Author Harper Lee signed a contract authorizing a play adaptation of her classic novel in June 2015, just before she died, and producer Scott Rudin enlisted talented wordsmith Aaron Sorkin to write the adaptation. But given that To Kill a Mockingbird deals with racial tensions and was published in 1960, Sorkin sought to update the story and its characters to comment on the world we live in today. Per The New York Times, the Lee Estate argues that’…
See full article at Collider.com »

Harper Lee’s Estate Sues Over Aaron Sorkin’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Adaptation

  • The Wrap
Harper Lee’s Estate Sues Over Aaron Sorkin’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Adaptation
Harper Lee’s legal-themed classic “To Kill a Mockingbird” could be stirring up some courtroom drama of its own very soon. The estate of “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee, who died in 2016, has filed suit over an adaptation of the work, according to court papers obtained by TheWrap. The complaint, filed Tuesday in federal court in Alabama, takes aim at Scott Rudin’s theater production company Rudinplay. According to the suit, Lee entered a contract with Rudinplay in 2015 regarding live stage and ancillary rights to her novel. Also Read: Harper Lee Called Donald Trump's Casinos 'Worst Punishment God Can Devise' According...
See full article at The Wrap »

Harper Lee Estate Sues Over Aaron Sorkin Adaptation of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

Harper Lee Estate Sues Over Aaron Sorkin Adaptation of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'
Before a theatrical adaptation of Harper Lee's iconic novel To Kill a Mockingbird debuts on Broadway, an Alabama federal judge is getting what should be the dream assignment of providing a critical reading. That's because on Tuesday, the late author's estate filed a lawsuit against Rudinplay, the production vehicle of Scott Rudin, over a new script by Aaron Sorkin.

According to the complaint, Lee optioned a live stage version to Rudin on June 29, 2015, just months before she died at the age of 89. For the right to create a dramatic adaptation of her famous novel about a small-town Alabama...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Movie Review – Sweet Country (2017)

Sweet Country, 2017.

Directed by Warwick Thornton

Starring Bryan Brown, Sam Neill, Hamilton Morris, Matt Day, Tremayne Doolan, Trevon Doolan, and Ewen Leslie.

Synopsis:

In the Northern Territory frontier of Australia in 1920, an Aboriginal farmhand is left in charge of a property while his boss is away. But he shoots a white man in self-defence and, believing he has no chance of justice, goes on the run. A posse, with a determined local sergeant at its head, is soon on his tail.

Sweet Country opens with an image that brands itself on your brain. A close-up of billy tea bubbling in the pot. More leaves are added to the water, then two handfuls of sugar and it bubbles up again. In itself, the image is innocuous, but what you can hear isn’t. Shouts, swearing, blows, beatings, cries of pain. Then it stops abruptly. You never see what’s been happening
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Watch Stephen Colbert Slam Trump's 'Arm the Teachers' Plan

Watch Stephen Colbert Slam Trump's 'Arm the Teachers' Plan
Stephen Colbert criticized President Trump's plan to arm schoolteachers in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting on Thursday's Late Show.

"The national conversation continues to be how to keep our children safe from gun violence," Colbert said. "Everyone acknowledges this is a crisis – from the president to the Republican Party to the NRA – every option is on the table … except fewer guns."

The host then poked fun at Trump's reliance on the "I hear you" memo at a White House gathering of Parkland victims as well as asking his audience
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Marshall and the Greatest Courtroom Dramas

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

Thurgood Marshall was the first African American to sit on the Us Supreme Court, but Marshall, 2017’s theatrical release named after him, rather than telling the story of how he came to occupy his seat there, instead focuses on a trial in which he became involved as a much younger lawyer. It stars Josh Gad, Kate Hudson and Black Panther himself, Chadwick Boseman, as the eponymous lawyer, with Sterling K. Brown, James Cromwell and Dan Stevens rounding out the impressive cast.

Marhsall is out on DVD on 26th February 2018

Marshall’s home entertainment release is fast approaching (out on Monday the 26th…) and it has got us thinking about cinema’s grand tradition of impressive courtroom dramas.

Courtroom dramas have been part of the fabric of cinema for decades and whether convincing, dramatically effective, unrealistic or wish-fulfillment, their back-and-forth pugilism and often sky-high stakes continue to make them compelling viewing.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Jeff Daniels Will Lead ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ on Broadway + More N.Y. Theater News

On Broadway and beyond, a curtain can rise as quickly as it can fall; a star can be swapped as easily as Bernie Telsey can say, “That’s enough.” Theater is the beating heart of New York show business and, if you want to make it here, it’s crucial you’re up to date on incoming projects, latest castings, and other industry news. Don’t worry, Broadway baby, Backstage has your back. Every week, we’re rounding up the can’t-miss stories no thespian should live without, so you can focus on important matters like hitting your high F. Curtain up and light those lights! A “Newsroom” reunion is heading to the Great White Way.A slew of stage and screen veterans have been assembled to star in Aaron Sorkin’s Broadway adaptation of Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Beginning performances Nov. 1 at a yet-to-be-announced theater, Jeff Daniels
See full article at Backstage »

Greenlit: Ryan Murphy Makes Waves At Netflix + More Industry Casting Outlook

Greenlit means a project is officially a go, so all you have to do is follow these leads to stay up to date. You never know where you’ll find an opportunity to land an audition! “To Kill a Mockingbird” Though the upcoming stage adaptation of Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” written by none other than Aaron Sorkin, was announced months ago, the production moved forward in a big way this past week, when Broadway was abuzz with the news Jeff Daniels had been cast in the lead role of Atticus Finch, alongside Celia Keenan-Bolger as Scout. The casting decision reunites Daniels and Sorkin, who starred in and wrote HBO’s late “The Newsroom,” respectively. While a lot of the featured cast, which includes Will Pullen, Gideon Glick, and Latanya Richardson Jackson, has already been announced, the Scott Rudin and Lincoln Center Theater production has got Daniel Swee
See full article at Backstage »

Reg E. Cathey, Emmy-Winning ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59

  • Indiewire
Reg E. Cathey, Emmy-Winning ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59
Reg E. Cathey, who was best known for playing Freddy on “House of Cards,” has died at age 59. The news first announced by “The Wire” creator David Simon, who called Cathey “not only a fine, masterful actor — but simply one of the most delightful human beings with whom I ever shared some long days on set.” Netflix has since confirmed the news to IndieWire.

“On wit alone, he could double any man over and leave him thinking. Reg, your memory is a great blessing,” Simon added of his collaborator, who appeared in 23 episodes of the revered HBO drama. Cathey received three consecutive Emmy nominations for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his role on “House of Cards,” winning in 2015. A character actor whose career spanned decades, he his silver-screen resume includes everything from “Born on the Fourth of July” and “The Mask” to “What About Bob?” and “Se7en
See full article at Indiewire »

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59
Actor Reg E. Cathey, who played Freddy on “House of Cards” and appeared in “The Wire,” has died. He was 59 and had reportedly been battling cancer.

Known for his distinctive baritone voice, Reginald Eugene Cathey began acting in 1984 in a television movie called “A Doctor’s Story.” He guest starred on numerous television shows, playing Norman Wilson in seasons four and five of “The Wire” as well as in “Grimm,” “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” “House of Cards,” and drama “Outcast.”

Cathey won an Emmy for outstanding guest actor in a drama series in 2015 for his work on “House of Cards.” He was previously nominated in 2014 and received another nomination in 2016 for the same role.

“We are heartbroken by the passing of our friend and House of Cards colleague Reg E. Cathey,” said Netflix in a statement. “Reg was the kindest man, the most giving actor, a true gentlemen. Our sympathy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59
Actor Reg E. Cathey, who played Freddy on “House of Cards” and appeared in “The Wire,” has died. He was 59 and had reportedly been battling cancer.

Known for his distinctive baritone voice, Reginald Eugene Cathey began acting in 1984 in a television movie called “A Doctor’s Story.” He guest starred on numerous television shows, playing Norman Wilson in seasons four and five of “The Wire” as well as in “Grimm,” “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” “House of Cards,” and drama “Outcast.”

Cathey won an Emmy for outstanding guest actor in a drama series in 2015 for his work on “House of Cards.” He was previously nominated in 2014 and received another nomination in 2016 for the same role.

“We are heartbroken by the passing of our friend and House of Cards colleague Reg E. Cathey,” said Netflix in a statement. “Reg was the kindest man, the most giving actor, a true gentlemen. Our sympathy
See full article at Variety - TV News »

A Horrifying History is Uncovered in Trailer for Sundance Doc ‘Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?’

Travis Wilkerson’s Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? was one of the must-sees on last year’s festival circuit, presented either as a straight-ahead documentary or through a “live cinema” environment wherein the writer-director presented his footage with an in-person voiceover. In whatever form it’s seen, many — from the Village Voice to the New York Times to Sight & Sound to Artforum to the New Yorker — spoke of it as a titanic experience, inciting chills for its exploration of personal history as a microcosm of national shame.

The theatrical version of Wilkerson’s project will be released next month by Grasshopper Film, and thus there is a trailer to mark the occasion. Overlaying the horrifying history with images of southern life and the ultimate image of decency, Atticus Finch, it gives some taste of the journey endured by its creator.

Watch below:

Formally audacious and emotionally powerful: a meditation on conscience and responsibility,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Diane Keaton Stands by Woody Allen: ‘He’s My Friend and I Continue to Believe Him’

Diane Keaton Stands by Woody Allen: ‘He’s My Friend and I Continue to Believe Him’
Diane Keaton is standing by her friend and former collaborator Woody Allen. In recent weeks, numerous actors who have appeared in Allen’s films have said they regret doing so in light of Dylan Farrow’s allegation that the director molested her as a child. Keaton stands by her claim that she believes Allen’s denial of Farrow’s allegation, calling the director her “friend” and linking to a 1992 “60 Minutes” interview in which Allen defends himself.

Read More:Alec Baldwin Compares Dylan Farrow to Character From ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Who Lied About Her Rape

“Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him,” Keaton wrote in a tweet published January 29. “It might be of interest to take a look at the ’60 Minutes’ interview from 1992 and see what you think.”

Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him. It might be of interest to
See full article at Indiewire »

Alec Baldwin Compares Dylan Farrow to Character From ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Who Lied About Her Rape

Alec Baldwin Compares Dylan Farrow to Character From ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Who Lied About Her Rape
Alec Baldwin has been vocal about defending Woody Allen against Dylan Farrow’s sexual molestation allegation, but now he’s gone on to target Farrow specifically in a new series of tweets. Baldwin compares Farrow to Mayella Violet Ewell from “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The character is infamous in Harper Lee’s novel for falsely accusing an African-American man of raping her.

Read More:Alec Baldwin Defends Woody Allen by Asking: ‘What Would It Take for You to Consider He is Telling the Truth?’

“[One] of the most effective things Dylan Farrow has in her arsenal is the ‘persistence of emotion,'” Baldwin tweeted on January 28. “Like Mayella in [“To Kill a Mockingbird”], her tears/exhortations [are] meant [to] shame you [into] belief in her story. But I need more than that before I destroy [someone], regardless of their fame. I need a lot more.”

Baldwin later tweeted that people should unfollow him if they disagree with his defense of Allen.
See full article at Indiewire »

In Cold Blood Detective's Son Reflects on Brutal Case, Relationships with Capote and Harper Lee

In Cold Blood Detective's Son Reflects on Brutal Case, Relationships with Capote and Harper Lee
Paul Dewey was just a boy in 1959 when his detective dad was assigned to investigate the brutal slayings of the Clutter family, who had been found bound and shot to death in their Holcomb, Kansas, farmhouse that November.

The crime — which stunned the tight-knit, trusting community — gained national attention, and eventually infamy, after author Truman Capote traveled there to research it for his 1966 book, In Cold Blood.

Capote’s non-fiction account, a bestseller of both wide acclaim and criticism (for its sometimes murky blend of factual reporting and fictional flourishes), soon became a 1967 film and is now thought of as
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Miracle Worker

Anybody that appreciates good theater and good moviemaking will be in awe of Arthur Penn’s marvelous visualization of this tale of a determined woman achieving the impossible — teaching a child that can neither see nor hear. The knock down, drag ’em out scenes between Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke are unique, to say the least.

The Miracle Worker

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1962 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke, Victor Jory, Inga Swenson, Andrew Prine, Judith Lowry.

Cinematography: Ernesto Caparrós

Film Editor: Aram Avakian

Art Direction: George Jenkins

Original Music: Laurence Rosenthal

Written by William Gibson, from his stage play

Produced by Fred Coe

Directed by Arthur Penn

I can barely believe that Arthur Penn’s obviously superior picture The Miracle Worker wasn’t picked off by Criterion years ago. It’s that good — it ought to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Alan Pakula: The Whole Damn Thing’ Doc On Way From ‘Always At The Carlyle’ Filmmaker

‘Alan Pakula: The Whole Damn Thing’ Doc On Way From ‘Always At The Carlyle’ Filmmaker
Exclusive: It’s been a long time coming, but finally someone is doing a feature documentary on the life of the great writer/director/producer Alan J. Pakula, the filmmaker whose work included classics To Kill a Mockingbird, All the President’s Men and Sophie’s Choice and who died tragically on the Long Island Expressway in 1998 at only 70 years old. The film has the blessing and participation of his widow Hannah Pakula and the Pakula family. Matthew Miele, whose Always at…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

53rd Chicago International Film Festival Review – Mudbound (2017)

Mudbound, 2017.

Directed by Dee Rees.

Starring Jason Mitchell, Garrett Hedlund, Carey Mulligan, Jason Clarke, Jonathan Banks, Kerry Cahill, Rob Morgan, Kelvin Harrison Jr., Lucy Faust, Henry Frost, Dylan Arnold, David Jensen, Geraldine Singer, and Mary J. Blige.

Synopsis:

Two men return home from World War II to work on a farm in rural Mississippi, where they struggle to deal with racism and adjusting to life after war.

It is undeniably perplexing that a person, regardless of any race, gender, or sexual orientation, can willingly enlist and fight in a war only to come home treated like mud. There are a lot of intertwining stories going on in Mudbound (a film directed by Dee Rees and adapted from the novel by Hillary Jordan that is so timely and powerful, I feel ashamed for not having seen her other breakout work Pariah yet), complete with frequent voiceover narrations from six different characters (admittedly,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lost in time by Anne-Katrin Titze

Hampton Fancher: "You know, I wrote Blade Runner for Robert Mitchum. The first draft was for him. And Robert Mulligan was going to direct it." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Hampton Fancher, co-screenwriter of Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 and Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, told me that he had Robert Mitchum in mind, not Harrison Ford, while writing his first draft of the Blade Runner screenplay when Robert Mulligan (To Kill A Mockingbird) was going to direct the film.

In our conversation at Lincoln Center, Hampton also saw Sam Shepard and Mitchum similarities, that Harry Dean Stanton had a Mitchum-like attitude, and expressed what Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds and a Wallace Stevens poem can do to him.

Hampton Fancher, subject of Michael Almereyda's recent documentary Escapes and director of The Minus Man (starring Owen Wilson as a serial killer) starts out with coming to grips with evil and beauty.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »
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