Knife in the Water (1962) - News Poster

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Persona review – Ingmar Bergman's enigmatic masterpiece still captivates

Bergman’s sensually brilliant 1966 film about a mute actress and her psychiatric nurse is an endlessly questioning and mysterious disquisition on identity

Here, for the centenary of Ingmar Bergman’s birth, is a rerelease of one of his fiercest, strangest, most sensually brilliant and unclassifiable pictures: Persona, from 1966. This was last revived in British cinemas 14 years ago, and I have in the past been agnostic about what I felt were contrivances and rather atypical attempts to engage with the Godardian spirit of the times.

Revisited now, the movie actually more suggests the Roman Polanski of Knife in the Water and Repulsion. Yet more than that, it forces on the audience its own utter uniqueness. It is stark, spare, endlessly questioning and self-questioning, a movie whose enigmas and challenges multiply, like the heads of Hydra.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The World’s Most Beautiful Swindlers

A breezy five-episode compilation movie about swindles plays out in five film capitals, under the eye of five different directors including Claude Chabrol and Jean-Luc Godard. But Roman Polanski’s Amsterdam segment couldn’t be included, which is a shame. It’s in B&W ‘scope, and everybody gets to bring their favorite cameraman and composer along.

The World’s Most Beautiful Swindlers

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1964 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 95 108, 124 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / Les plus belles escroqueries du monde / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Mie Hama, Ken Mitsuda, Nicole Karen, Gabriella Giorgelli, Jan Teulings, Arnold Gelderman, Guido Giuseppone, Giuseppe Mannajuolo, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Catherine Deneuve, Francis Blanche, Sacha Briquet, Jean-Louis Maury, Philomène Toulouse, Charles Denner, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Seberg, László Szabó.

Cinematography: Raoul Coutard, Tonino Delli Colli, Jerzy Lipman, Asakazu Nakai, Jean Rabier

Film Editor:

Original Music: Serge Gainsbourg, Pierre Jansen, Krzysztof Komeda, Michel Legrand, Keitaro Miho, Piero Umiliani
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Based on a True Story’: Eva Green and Emmanuelle Seigner Are Lovers in First Look at Roman Polanski’s New Drama

‘Based on a True Story’: Eva Green and Emmanuelle Seigner Are Lovers in First Look at Roman Polanski’s New Drama
Lionsgate has released the first-look image from Roman Polanski’s thriller-drama “Based on a True Story,” which marks the French-Polish director’s first film in four years. The film, whose original title in French is “D’après une histoire vraie” and stars Eva Green and Emmanuelle Seigner, will show at the Cannes Films Festival, which will run May 17 – 28.

Read More: Roman Polanski Compares Court to Nazis for Rejecting Motion to Avoid Further Jail Time

The film is an adaptation of Delphine de Vigan’s novel of the same name. Polanski wrote the script with writer and “Personal Shopper” director Olivier Assayas. “Based on a True Story” follows a Parisian writer (Seigner) who gets romantically involved with an obsessed admirer (Green) who tries to impose influence on her.

Read More: The Films of Roman Polanski, Ranked Worst to Best

During his embattled five-decade career, Polanski has helmed a long list of acclaimed films,
See full article at Indiewire »

Roman Polanski’s Rape Victim Samantha Geimer Speaks Out: ‘He’s Apologized, I Forgive Him’

Roman Polanski’s Rape Victim Samantha Geimer Speaks Out: ‘He’s Apologized, I Forgive Him’
Earlier this week, Roman Polanski’s heavy-hitting lawyer Harland Braun made a move to put a close to the horrific child rape case that unfolded in 1977, leading to the French-Polish filmmaker’s controversial plea deal and his fleeing the country.

Per TMZ, Braun “has asked an L.A. County Superior Court judge to unseal a long-secret transcript of the testimony of the prosecutor in the Polanski case. Braun believes the secret testimony supports Polanski’s claim that he cut a deal to serve only 48 days behind bars for raping a 13-year-old girl in 1977, and the judge signed off. Polanski actually spent 42 days in Chino State Prison and was released. But Judge Laurence Rittenband allegedly reneged on the deal and told prosecutors he decided Polanski should spend up to 50 years in prison.”

Read More: IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Jody Hill Looks at Roman Polanski’s Debut,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Foods That Inspire Me’: Filmmakers Share Favorite Snacks With IndieWire and FilmStruck

‘Foods That Inspire Me’: Filmmakers Share Favorite Snacks With IndieWire and FilmStruck
As we head into the final weeks of the year, when you might have extra days off for a chill evening of movie watching, allow the directors from our “Movies That Inspire Me” (presented in partnership with FilmStruck) to offer heartfelt advice as to what you should eat.

Read More: Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

Though most of the questions we’ve asked our distinguished collection of interview subjects have focused on the films that shaped their careers and lives, we also asked our filmmakers to share some of their go-to movie food.

Some of the standards earn mentions: wine, cocktails, cheese, and popcorn all came up. But a few of the other responses might surprise you.

If you’d like to hear more from the filmmakers we spoke to, you can find all of our conversations
See full article at Indiewire »

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Roger Ross Williams Goes Dark With Lars Von Trier’s ‘Breaking the Waves’

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Roger Ross Williams Goes Dark With Lars Von Trier’s ‘Breaking the Waves’
Roger Ross Williams is the director of the uplifting documentary “Life, Animated,” but he also has an affinity for films that explore the darker side of the human condition. And who better to embody that sensibility than Lars von Trier?

Read More: Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

Von Trier’s filmography often lends itself to less-than-cheery characterization, but his 1996 film “Breaking the Waves” is particularly harrowing. Starring Emily Watson and Stellan Skarsgård as a married couple whose life is changed irrevocably by an oil rig accident, the film follows their inner turmoil and physical trials as they try to find a way to persevere.

As part of our ongoing series of filmmaker discussions (presented with FilmStruck), Williams spoke with us about the film’s depiction of autism and the ways that misunderstandings can lead to humanity’s darker nature.
See full article at Indiewire »

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Roger Ross Williams and How ‘The War Room’ Changed Politics

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Roger Ross Williams and How ‘The War Room’ Changed Politics
As part of our ongoing partnership with FilmStruck, we’re celebrating Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker’s thrilling inside look at Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential campaign, “The War Room.”

Oscar-winning documentarian Roger Ross Williams, who’s now on the 2017 documentary shortlist for “Life, Animated,” said he’s still shocked by the directors’ unprecedented access to a campaign that “got really dirty.”

Read More:IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Jody Hill Looks at Roman Polanski’s Debut, ‘Knife in the Water

“It was the first time we really got to see warts-and-all of a campaign and the sort-of brilliance of the strategists who are real stars of that film,” said Williams in the clip below.

Read More: IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Nicole Holofcener Explains How ‘High Hopes’ Earns Its Title

The War Room” is available on FilmStruck, as are other Pennebaker docs including “Don’t Look Back,
See full article at Indiewire »

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Jody Hill Looks at Roman Polanski’s Debut, ‘Knife in the Water’

IndieWire and FilmStruck’s ‘Movies That Inspire Me’: Jody Hill Looks at Roman Polanski’s Debut, ‘Knife in the Water’
Roman Polanski has made films spanning continents and generations. But Jody Hill prefers the filmmaker’s first feature, a story as simple as two men, a woman, and a sailboat.

Read More: Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

Knife in the Water” follows a couple who, on their way to the lake for a day of sailing, pick up a hitchhiker and invite him to join them. What transpires between the three of them out on the water is a carefully choreographed dance of attraction, recklessness, and isolation.

Hill spoke with us about the danger and tension that drew him to the film at a young age.

This is our second conversation with Hill as part of our “Movies That Inspire Me” series, presented in partnership with FilmStruck. (If you missed him talking about the classic rock doc “Gimme Shelter,
See full article at Indiewire »

Magnetic Pole: Andrzej Kondratiuk and the Strange Attraction of "Hydro-Riddle"

  • MUBI
StardustExile can take many forms. Several major filmmakers from Poland famously followed the Chopin route to France—Walerian Borowczyk, Andrzej Żuławski, to a degree even Krzysztof Kieślowski—while their pugilistic peer Jerzy Skolimowski, as well as Roman Polanski, was ranging even further across Europe and beyond. But the comically-oriented writer-director Andrzej Kondratiuk—an early Polanski co-conspirator, who died in June aged 79—found voluntary geographical exile without leaving his own country. He was able to renew his creative energies in rural isolation, seeking, gaining and retaining true independence amid a political system founded upon collective, communal effort. Kondratiuk’s five-decade career is thus a consistently idiosyncratic and enigmatic one, encompassing eight theatrical features, several shorts and five TV-movies. Among the latter is the work for which he’s now best known—at least at home—the raucous and irresistibly-titled black-and-white superhero/comicbook spoof Hydro-Riddle (Hydrozagadka, 1972), which after hostile initial reactions has
See full article at MUBI »

Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck
Today we’re launching a new video series of which we’re extremely proud: It’s “Movies That Inspire Me,” presented by FilmStruck. We’ve interviewed a host of great directors, all of whom have taken films to the Sundance Film Festival, about their favorite classic films streaming on FilmStruck from the Turner Classic Movies and Criterion Collection. And the conversations we’ve had are surprising as well as, yes, inspiring.

First up is Pablo Larraín. Currently the director of Oscar contenders “Jackie” and “Neruda,” he brought “No” to Sundance in 2012. His first inspiration is John Cassavetes’ “A Woman Under The Influence” (which you can watch on FilmStruck here.)

Upcoming is Larraín talking about the music of Krzysztof Kieslowski’s “Three Colors: Blue,” as well as appearances by Jody Hill (“The Foot Fist Way,” “Eastbound & Down”), who talks about his love for the Maysles’ Bros. “Gimme Shelter” and Roman Polanski
See full article at Indiewire »

Directors Who Found Success in Both the Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film Categories

Pablo Larraín (Courtesy: Andrew Cowie/Afp)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

There’s one director this year that has a chance at being a major crossover success by having two separate films nominated in both the best picture and best foreign language film categories: Pablo Larraín. This filmmaker has Jackie as well as Neruda and could join an elite group of directors who been able to have films — or even one film — in both of these major categories.

Jackie, which stars Natalie Portman as Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, is considered a frontrunner in the Oscars race this year by this site’s namesake, The Hollywood Reporter’s Scott Feinberg. Neruda, which follows an inspector who hunts down Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, is Chile’s submission for best foreign language film this year and is considered a major threat in that contest. This would be a great feat — especially for someone who,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Explore Roman Polanski’s “Cinema of Invasion” in a New Video Essay

“No one does it to you like Roman Polanski” – a tagline that would take on some rather unfortunate new contexts only a few years after its unveiling, or the rare bit of marketing to properly sell an artist? Answer: both. But we’ll only focus on the second point, our impetus being a new, Cristina Álvarez López– and Adrian Martin-helmed video essay on some of the director’s close-quarter thrillers as a “cinema of invasion.”

Even this well-learned Polanski admirer, one who could fire off more than a few examples of how the assorted films — Knife in the Water, Repulsion, Cul-de-sac, Rosemary’s Baby, The Tenant, Frantic, Bitter Moon, and The Ghost Writer — overlap, was impressed and, more importantly, surprised by the connections drawn here. Taking full advantage of both the material at hand and ways of bringing them closer together (disassociated sound, split-screen), Álvarez López and Martin’s
See full article at The Film Stage »

Roman Polanski & Olivier Assayas To Adapt The Novel ‘Based on a True Story’

Roman Polanski & Olivier Assayas To Adapt The Novel ‘Based on a True Story’
Though director Roman Polanski’s next film was set to tackle the Dreyfus affair, the 1890s French political scandal involving a Captain of the French Army who was convicted of passing secrets to the Germans, it has so far failed to get off the ground. But now The Film Stage reports that Polanski will adapt Delphine de Vigan’s novel “Based on a True Story,” with a script from writer-director Olivier Assayas. The novel tells the story of a writer who goes through a rough time after the release of their latest book, and their relationship with an admirer who tries to impose influence on the writer.

Read More: Roman Polanski Will Not Be Extradited to U.S.

Polanski is best known for his numerous acclaimed films during his five-decade career. Some of these include “Knife in the Water,” “Repulsion,” “Cul-de-Sac,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” “Macbeth,” “Chinatown,” and “The Pianist.” His
See full article at Indiewire »

Hitch Hike | Blu-ray Review

Raro Video resurrects an exploitation goodie masquerading as another bit of cheap Eurosleaze, Hitch Hike (aka Autostop Rosso Sangue) a 1977 thriller from Italian director Pasquale Festa Campanile. Like a tawdry version of an early Polanski effort, it’s a significant anomaly of its ilk for several reasons, the most notable being its director, usually known as a fixture of 1970’s Italian-style comedy (aka commedia all’italiana). Adapted from the novel The Violence and the Fury by Peter Kern, it’s headlined by Franco Nero, French actress Corinne Clery (the title character from infamous The Story of O, 1975) and grindhouse staple David Hess (The Last House on the Left, 1972), while predictable story elements spiked with moments of brutal violence should be enough to rejuvenate interest in a title not often screened in the Us (despite its initial box office success in Europe).

Walter Mancini (Franco Nero), a bitter, alcoholic journalist, is
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Everything Steven Soderbergh Watched and Read in 2015

Displaying a transparency that few filmmakers of his fame and / or caliber would even bother with, Steven Soderbergh has, for a couple of years, been keen on releasing lists of what he watched and read during the previous twelve months. If you’re at all interested in this sort of thing — and why not? what else are you even doing with your day? — the 2015 selection should be of strong interest, this being a time when he was fully enmeshed in the world of creating television.

He’s clearly observing the medium with a close eye, be it what’s on air or what his friends (specifically David Fincher and his stillborn projects) show him, and how that might relate to his apparent love of 48 Hours Mystery or approach to a comparatively light slate of cinematic assignments — specifically: it seems odd that the last time he watched Magic Mike Xxl, a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Criterion Link Collection: October 6th 2015

Here are a handful of links that I think are worth reading today, for discerning Criterion Collection fan.

Articles

Over on his Criterion Reflections blog, David has just posted his review of Mikio Naruse’s Scattered Clouds:

Since a couple years have passed between my last viewing of a Naruse film (1964’s Yearning, back in 2013, though not reviewed anywhere), I was thus quite eager to sit down and take in Scattered Clouds, available on Criterion’s Hulu channel (and only there, as no version of it on disc is anywhere to be found for the Region 1 market, anyway.)

Don’t miss the Criterion Collection As Haiku blog’s latest entry, on Lonesome.

Jonathan Rosenbaum has republished his review of Whit Stillman’s Metropolitan on his blog, adding:

Even though this is favorable, I think I underestimated the achievement of this first feature; reseeing it a quarter of a century later,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Toronto: Poland Cinema on the Rise With Cash Infusion

Toronto: Poland Cinema on the Rise With Cash Infusion
After a decade of support and development led by the Polish Film Institute, the Poland production story is as much about quality as it is about quantity. Since its inception, the org, established to foster a strong native film sector and create viable international partnerships, has been guiding emerging filmmakers, who put out more than 40 features annually, along with the help of coin gleaned from television, cinemas and distributors.

According to industry observers, the mechanism has had unusual success in commercial and critical arenas.

Last year Lukasz Palkowski’s acclaimed Cold War account of a courageous, unconventional surgeon, “Gods,” drew north of 2 million domestic tix and rose to success alongside another strong Polish project, the real-life spy story “Jack Strong” by Wladyslaw Pasikowski.

The successes were no flukes, says Izabela Kiszka of the Pfi.

“Polish viewers are (coming) back to the cinema,” she says. “We had approximately 40 million admissions, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tiff & Venice Trailer: Pulse Pounding Teaser For Jerzy Skolimowski's '11 Minutes'

Jerzy Skolimowski knows how to rattle an audience. He's the co-writer behind Roman Polanski's "Knife In The Water," his last feature "Essential Killing" cast Vincent Gallo as an Afghan Pow, and now he's back on the festival circuit with "11 Minutes." And it looks like one that you can only dare to ignore. Starring Richard Dormer, Wojciech Mecwaldowski, Andrzej Chyra, Dawid Ogrodnik, and Paulina Chapko captures various slices of life in Warsaw all in eleven minute fragments, with everything pulling together for a grand finale. Sounds like a one that will be a lot of fun to see how it's pulled off. Here's the official synopsis:  After a seventeen-year break from filmmaking in the 1990s and 2000s, one of the major figures of Polish cinema returned to his native country and emerged with 2008's wonderful Four Nights with Anna, heralding the resurrection of a protean artist. Firmly ensconced back in Poland,
See full article at The Playlist »

HanWay in time with Skolimowski’s '11 Minutes'

  • ScreenDaily
HanWay in time with Skolimowski’s '11 Minutes'
Exclusive: UK sales outfit to handle Venice-bound thriller starring Richard Dormer.

London-based Hanway Films is to handle sales on Jerzy Skolimowski’s Venice-bound thriller 11 Minutes, starring Richard Dormer (Good Vibrations, Fortitude).

The Poland-Ireland co-production is Skolimowski’s fourth film to play in competition at Venice and follows the same 11 minutes in the lives of several different characters: young and old, prosperous and destitute.

Dormer plays the lead role of a film director in the English and Polish-language production, alongside Agata Buzek, Beata Tyszkiewicz and Mateusz Kościukiewicz.

Skolimowski’s wife and regular producer Ewa Piaskowska produces for the duo’s Skopia Film with Andrew Lowe and Ed Guiney co-producing for Element Pictures.

The Irish Film Board and Element Pictures are among backers of the project after previously collaborating on the director’s most recent outing, Essential Killing.

Essential Killing was also repped by HanWay and played at Venice in 2010, where it picked up the Special Jury Prize, CinemAvvenire
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Z For Zachariah Trailer: Three’s a Crowd in the Post-Apocalypse

From Craig Zobel, director of 2012’s most uncomfortable movie, Compliance, comes a post-apocalyptic take on a most awkward situation: The three’s a crowd thriller. Based on a novel by Robert C. O’Brien, Z For Zachariah is set in a post-apocalyptic landscape, but is seemingly more in the tradition of films like Knife in the Water and Dead Calm. “In the…

The post Z For Zachariah Trailer: Three’s a Crowd in the Post-Apocalypse appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »
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