The Miracle Worker (1962) - News Poster

News

August 20th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include The Witches, Billy The Kid Vs. Dracula, Horror Of Frankenstein, Brightburn, The Walking Dead Season 9

For this week’s home media releases, we have killer superheroes, prehistoric creatures, Frankenstein by way of Hammer, Anjelica Huston as a witch, the final farewell to Rick Grimes, and more on tap. Kino Lorber is keeping busy this Tuesday with several new Blu-rays, including 4D Man, Dinosaurs! and Billy the Kid vs. Dracula, and Scream Factory is releasing the recent indie horror flick I Trapped the Devil and more Hammer genre goodness with Horror of Frankenstein as well. Another film I’m very excited to see hitting Blu is The Witches from the Warner Archive Collection, and William Friedkin’s Cruising is getting the special edition treatment from Arrow Video.

If you missed it in theaters, Brightburn will arrive on various formats this week, and for those of you who want to enjoy Rick Grimes’ final moments from this past season of The Walking Dead, you’ll get your
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: "The Miracle Worker" (1962) Starring Anne Bancroft And Patty Duke; Olive Films Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
“A Mesmerizing Battle Of Wills”

By Raymond Benson

Some say the year 1939 was the “greatest year of cinema,” and, sure, there were many memorable titles released then that remain classics today. I argue, though, that 1962 was even better. Lawrence of Arabia. To Kill a Mockingbird. Dr. No. The Longest Day. The Manchurian Candidate. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. The Music Man. Jules and Jim. And there was also Arthur Penn’s The Miracle Worker.

Based on the stage play by William Gibson (who also wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay), The Miracle Worker contains two of the most astonishing performances ever put on celluloid. Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke both deservedly won Oscars for their roles, respectively, as the teacher Annie Sullivan and the remarkable Helen Keller as a young girl. The pair light up the screen in intimate, physically-demanding scenes that become a mesmerizing battle of wills—which is what
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Anne Bancroft Directing Feature ‘Fatso’ Hits Blu-ray Via Shout Select In June

Late actress Anne Bancroft had a stellar career in cinema, and some of her best known films include The Miracle Worker (for which she won an Oscar) and The Graduate. Her work with husband Mel Brooks included the films To Be Or Not To Be (a remake of the Ernst Lubitsch classic) and Silent Movie. [...]

The post Anne Bancroft Directing Feature ‘Fatso’ Hits Blu-ray Via Shout Select In June appeared first on Hollywood Outbreak.
See full article at Hollywood Outbreak »

14th Annual Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival

14th Annual Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival
Opening Night features the Los Angeles Premiere of the new documentary ‘Carl Laemmle’ on Thursday, May 2, 2019 at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theater, Beverly Hills will honor Peter Bogdanovich who also appears in the film.

Since 2006, the Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival, has presented successful programs while filing a cultural void in the Los Angeles community for affiliated Jews, unaffiliated Jews and non-Jews. It offers an opportunity to open up new dialogues, meet emerging filmmakers, Jewish scholars and celebrities and have a first look at the latest feature films, documentaries and shorts all dealing with Jewish thought, tradition, history and culture. The festival attempts to show the universality of Jewish values and experience through the diversity of the subjects of the films screened annually.

This year’s crop of films has some surprising and inspiring subjects, starting with Los Angeles icon, ‘Carl Laemmle’ whose son and grandson continue running the Laemmle
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Joan Crawford movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Mildred Pierce,’ ‘Possessed,’ ‘Sudden Fear’

  • Gold Derby
Joan Crawford movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Mildred Pierce,’ ‘Possessed,’ ‘Sudden Fear’
Joan Crawford would’ve celebrated her 113th birthday on March 23, 2019. Though she’s probably best remembered for the portrayals of her by other actresses, the Oscar-winning performer starred in a number of classics before her death in 1977 at the age of 71. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1906, Crawford made her debut as a body double for Norma Shearer in “Ladies of the Night” (1925). She worked her way up into starring roles in several MGM titles, most notably the ensemble drama “Grand Hotel” (1932). Yet a dip in audience enthusiasm led to her being labeled “box office poison,” which would haunt her for several years.

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Crawford moved to Warner Bros. in 1943, and just two years later, she was re-igniting the box office and scooping up a
See full article at Gold Derby »

Joan Crawford movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Joan Crawford movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Joan Crawford would’ve celebrated her 113th birthday on March 23, 2019. Though she’s probably best remembered for the portrayals of her by other actresses, the Oscar-winning performer starred in a number of classics before her death in 1977 at the age of 71. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1906, Crawford made her debut as a body double for Norma Shearer in “Ladies of the Night” (1925). She worked her way up into starring roles in several MGM titles, most notably the ensemble drama “Grand Hotel” (1932). Yet a dip in audience enthusiasm led to her being labeled “box office poison,” which would haunt her for several years.

Crawford moved to Warner Bros. in 1943, and just two years later, she was re-igniting the box office and scooping up a Best Actress Oscar for “Mildred Pierce” (1945). The role of an
See full article at Gold Derby »

How many times have both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress gone to the same film at the Oscars?

How many times have both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress gone to the same film at the Oscars?
Two films in contention at this year’s Oscars earned nominations for both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress: “The Favourite” (twice) and “Roma.” How likely is it that both women from the same film will win Academy Awards on Feb. 24? In the 82 years since the supporting awards were introduced at the 9th Oscars, 10 films could boast victories in both these races.

Fay Bainter and Bette Davis for “Jezebel” – 1939

Hattie McDaniel and Vivien Leigh for “Gone With the Wind” – 1940

Teresa Wright and Greer Garson for “Mrs. Miniver” – 1942

Kim Hunter and Vivien Leigh for “A Streetcar Named Desire” – 1952

Patty Duke and Anne Bancroft for “The Miracle Worker” – 1963

Sandy Dennis and Elizabeth Taylor for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” – 1967

Beatrice Straight and Faye Dunaway for “Network” – 1977

Olympia Dukakis and Cher for “Moonstruck” – 1988

Anna Paquin and Holly Hunter for “The Piano” in 1994

Judi Dench and Gwyneth Paltrow for “Shakespeare in Love” – 1999

While
See full article at Gold Derby »

Will ‘The Favourite’ become the 11th film to win Oscars for both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress?

Will ‘The Favourite’ become the 11th film to win Oscars for both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress?
Since the supporting acting awards were introduced at the 9th Oscars in 1936, only 10 films have bragging rights to wins for both their leading ladies and a featured actress. “The Favourite” could well become the 11th to do so. Olivia Colman is locked in a tight race for Best Actress with Lady Gaga (“A Star is Born”) and Glenn Close (“The Wife”). And two past Oscar winners — Emma Stone (“La La Land”) and Rachel Weisz (“The Constant Gardener”) — are in strong contention for Best Supporting Actress.

As with “The Favourite,” both the first and last films to win both these Oscars were period pieces. Just two years after the academy began rewarding supporting performances, Fay Bainter reaped nominations in both categories. While she lost her Best Actress bid for “White Banners” to her “Jezebel” co-star Bette Davis, she won Best Supporting Actress for playing Davis’ on-screen nemesis.

The most recent double
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘The Favourite’ could be 11th film to reign over the female acting Oscar categories

‘The Favourite’ could be 11th film to reign over the female acting Oscar categories
Will “The Favourite” rule over the female acting races at the Oscars? The film has three strong potential acting nominees in lead hopeful Olivia Colman and supporting contenders Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz. If Colman and one of Stone and Weisz prevail, it’d mark the 11th time — and first in 20 years — that a pair of co-stars won both categories.

The previous 10 films that won Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress are:

1. “Jezebel” (1938): Best Actress for Bette Davis, Best Supporting Actress for Fay Bainter

2. “Gone with the Wind” (1939): Best Actress for Vivien Leigh, Best Supporting Actress for Hattie McDaniel

3. “Mrs. Miniver” (1942): Best Actress for Greer Garson, Best Supporting Actress for Teresa Wright

4. “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951): Best Actress for Vivien Leigh, Best Supporting Actress for Kim Hunter

5. “The Miracle Worker” (1962): Best Actress for Anne Bancroft, Best Supporting Actress for Patty Duke

6. “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
See full article at Gold Derby »

Timothee Chalamet (‘Beautiful Boy’) would be the 2nd youngest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner

Timothee Chalamet (‘Beautiful Boy’) would be the 2nd youngest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner
Last season, 22-year-old Timothée Chalamet could have become the youngest Best Actor winner in Academy Award history for his breakthrough performance in Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name.” Even though Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”) prevailed, Chalamet is still the third youngest Best Actor nominee, just behind Jackie Cooper and Mickey Rooney.

This year, however, he could become the second youngest Best Supporting Actor winner for his performance in Felix Van Groeningen‘s biographical drama “Beautiful Boy.”

Based on the memoirs “Beautiful Boy” by David Sheff and “Tweak” by his son Nic Sheff, the film follows Nic (Chalamet), a teenager who leads a seemingly perfect life, but in reality struggles with an addiction to crystal meth, threatening to destroy his and his family’s entire lives. His father David (Steve Carell) watches his son as he slips into addiction and does everything in his power to prevent his son
See full article at Gold Derby »

Anne Bancroft movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Graduate,’ ‘The Miracle Worker’

  • Gold Derby
Anne Bancroft movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Graduate,’ ‘The Miracle Worker’
Anne Bancroft would’ve celebrated her 87th birthday on September 17. Born in 1931, the actress had a celebrated career on both the stage and screen, becoming one of the few people to win the trifecta of performance awards. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Bancroft made her Broadway debut in William Gibson‘s “Two for the Seesaw,” directed by Arthur Penn. The role brought her a Tony as Best Featured Actress in a play (1958). The very next year, she re-teamed with Gibson and Penn for “The Miracle Worker,” for which she won a second Tony (Best Actress in a Play in 1959).

Following the stage success, Bancroft, Penn and Gibson adapted “The Miracle Worker” to the big screen in 1962. Recreating the role of Annie Sullivan, a teacher struggling to help the deaf and blind Helen Keller (Patty Duke) learn to communicate,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Anne Bancroft movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Anne Bancroft movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Anne Bancroft would’ve celebrated her 87th birthday on September 17. Born in 1931, the actress had a celebrated career on both the stage and screen, becoming one of the few people to win the trifecta of performance awards. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Bancroft made her Broadway debut in William Gibson‘s “Two for the Seesaw,” directed by Arthur Penn. The role brought her a Tony as Best Featured Actress in a play (1958). The very next year, she re-teamed with Gibson and Penn for “The Miracle Worker,” for which she won a second Tony (Best Actress in a Play in 1959).

Following the stage success, Bancroft, Penn and Gibson adapted “The Miracle Worker” to the big screen in 1962. Recreating the role of Annie Sullivan, a teacher struggling to help the deaf and blind Helen Keller (Patty Duke) learn to communicate,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Horror Highlights: Bloody Disgusting’s “Retro Nightmares” Theatrical Screenings, Travel Channel’s “Ghostober” Programming, Living Dead Dolls’ Vesper, Masters Of The Grind Indiegogo Campaign

Five cult classics, including The House on Sorority Row, are being revived on the big screen by Bloody Disgusting for their "Retro Nightmares" cinema series kicking off on September 27th. Also in today's Horror Highlights: Travel Channel's "Ghostober" programming details, the latest addition to Mezco's Living Dead Dolls line, and the Indiegogo campaign for Masters of the Grind.

Bloody Disgusting's Retro Nightmares Film Series Details: Press Release: "Just in time to kick off the Halloween season, five HD digitally remastered cult horror classics--as voted online by fans--will be coming to the big screen as part of the “Bloody Disgusting Presents Retro Nightmares” Cinema Series this fall: The House on Sorority Row, Amityville: The Evil Escapes, Amityville: It’s About Time, Sweet Sixteen, and The Convent. Tickets are on sale now at www.Retronightmares.com for theaters nationwide.

Preeminent American horror genre website Bloody Disgusting, independent distribution company Multicom Entertainment Group,
See full article at DailyDead »

Film Review: ‘Far From the Tree’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Far From the Tree’
Let’s say you’re pregnant. It’s quite possibly the happiest and most anxiety-inducing time of your life. And then the doctor delivers the news: Your baby will be born with Down syndrome, deafness, or dwarfism. How do you react? Or maybe you’ve been a proud parent for years, and somewhere along the way, when your child reaches age 2 or 12 or 20, you learn that he has autism, identifies as transgender, or has been arrested for murder.

For centuries of human existence, such surprises have been greeted with horror by some parents, who have been known to surrender, institutionalize, or even disown their children on account of these culturally shameful differences — often the very things that make them special. Wrestling with what he perceived as a lack of love from his mother and father in reaction to his own homosexuality, Columbia University psychology professor Andrew Solomon wrote “Far From the Tree,
See full article at Variety »

Kent McCray Dies: ‘Little House On The Prairie’ Producer Was 89

  • Deadline
Kent McCray Dies: ‘Little House On The Prairie’ Producer Was 89
Kent McCray, producer of the classic Little House on the Prairie series, died of natural causes on June 3 at his home in Los Angeles. He was 89 years old.

As native Hartford, Conn., McCray’s career spanned more than 50 years. He was born on June 7, 1928, and is the second son of Thomas Chapman McCray, who was an executive with the NBC Radio Network as well as Dorothy Baldwin McCray who was a singer and a musician.

After graduating from Kimball Union Academy in New Hampshire — where his love of storytelling grew — he studied theater arts at the University of Hartford under Dr. Elemer Nagy. After receiving his diploma in 1948 he worked for the Central City Opera Association in Colorado and then went on to build his television career in Los Angeles.

He was a production coordinator on the All-Star Revue and The Colgate Comedy Hour at NBC and then worked for
See full article at Deadline »

Angela Lansbury: Finally an Emmy winner for ‘Little Women’ after 18 career losses?

Angela Lansbury: Finally an Emmy winner for ‘Little Women’ after 18 career losses?
Angela Lansbury, 2018 Emmy contender for Masterpiece Theater’s adaptation of “Little Women,” has one of the most unique awards histories of any performer. In her over 75-year career she has managed to amass a significant number of nominations for all three of the major acting awards: three Oscar noms, 18 Emmy bids and seven Tony citations. While she has sailed through the Tony Awards winning five times, the other awards have been more elusive.

Her Oscar nominations all came early in her career and she came up empty handed all three times (the Academy did remedy that with an honorary Oscar in 2013). Lansbury’s Emmy history has been downright infuriating for her fans since she has lost a staggering 18 times. That streak may come to an end this year if Lansbury is able to achieve the award for her work in PBS’s “Little Women.”

SEEEmmys 2018 exclusive: PBS ‘Masterpiece’ categories for ‘Little Women,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Nominated Live Action Shorts 2018 (90th Academy Awards) review

MaryAnn’s quick take… My pick: I think the quietly shocking “DeKalb Elementary” [pictured] may win for its very of-the-moment story about a school office worker’s attempt to de-escalate an invading gunman’s rage via patience and empathy. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

The power of film to move the needle on contentious topics of cultural debate could not possibly be on better display in the films nominated for the Oscar for Best Live Action Short… unless all five of them, instead of merely four, tackled serious matters with such social-justice-warrior ferocity. The one outlier here, though, is a very welcome light distraction.

The nominated films these year are all so strong that it’s difficult to pick an indisputable front-runner. But I think the quietly shocking “DeKalb Elementary” [IMDb|official site], by writer-director Reed Van Dyk,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

2018 Oscars: Will one film sweep both actress awards for the 11th time?

2018 Oscars: Will one film sweep both actress awards for the 11th time?
If our combined Oscar odds are correct, the Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress categories will be dominated by the stars of three films: Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf of “Lady Bird”; Margot Robbie and Allison Janney of “I, Tonya”; and Sally Hawkins and Octavia Spencer of “The Shape of Water.” And if one pair of co-stars wins, it’d be the 11th time both actress awards went to the same film.

The best chance of this happening is with Ronan and Metcalf. The former sits in second place in lead, behind “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing Missouri” star Frances McDormand, with 7/2 odds, while her onscreen mother is the favorite in supporting with 11/5 odds.

But after defeating Metcalf at the Golden Globes and Critics’ Choice, Janney is watching her stock rise quickly. She stands at 5/2 odds, while her onscreen daughter, Robbie, is in fifth in lead with 8/1 odds.

See Will ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Little Big Man (Region B)

Arthur Penn’s under-appreciated epic has everything a big-scale western could want — spectacle, interesting characters, good history and a sense of humor. Dustin Hoffman gets to play at least five characters in one as an ancient pioneer relating his career exploits — which are either outrageous tall tales or a concise history of the taking of The West.

Little Big Man

Region B Blu-ray

Koch Media

1970 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 139 147 min. / Available from Amazon.de / Street Date September 14, 2017 / Eur 17.99

Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Faye Dunaway, Chief Dan George, Martin Balsam, Richard Mulligan, Jeff Corey, Aimée Eccles, Kelly Jean Peters, Carole Androsky, Ruben Moreno, William Hickey, Jesse Vint, Alan Oppenheimer, Thayer David.

Cinematography: Harry Stradling Jr.

Production Designer: Dean Tavoularis

Art Direction: Angelo P. Graham

Special Makeup: Dick Smith

Special Effects: Logan Frazee

Film Editors: Dede Allen, Richard Marks

Original Music: John Hammond

Written by Calder Willingham from the novel by Thomas Berger

Produced
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Miracle Worker

Anybody that appreciates good theater and good moviemaking will be in awe of Arthur Penn’s marvelous visualization of this tale of a determined woman achieving the impossible — teaching a child that can neither see nor hear. The knock down, drag ’em out scenes between Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke are unique, to say the least.

The Miracle Worker

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1962 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke, Victor Jory, Inga Swenson, Andrew Prine, Judith Lowry.

Cinematography: Ernesto Caparrós

Film Editor: Aram Avakian

Art Direction: George Jenkins

Original Music: Laurence Rosenthal

Written by William Gibson, from his stage play

Produced by Fred Coe

Directed by Arthur Penn

I can barely believe that Arthur Penn’s obviously superior picture The Miracle Worker wasn’t picked off by Criterion years ago. It’s that good — it ought to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed