The events of D-Day, told on a grand scale from both the Allied and German points of view.

Writers:

Cornelius Ryan (screenplay), Cornelius Ryan (book) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
3,843 ( 989)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Eddie Albert ... Col. Thompson
Paul Anka ... U.S. Army Ranger
Arletty ... Madame Barrault
Jean-Louis Barrault ... Father Louis Roulland
Richard Beymer ... Pvt. Dutch Schultz
Hans Christian Blech ... Maj. Werner Pluskat
Bourvil ... Mayor of Colleville
Richard Burton ... Flying Officer David Campbell
Wolfgang Büttner Wolfgang Büttner ... Maj. Gen. Dr. Hans Speidel
Red Buttons ... Pvt. John Steele
Pauline Carton ... Maid
Sean Connery ... Pvt. Flanagan
Ray Danton ... Capt. Frank
Irina Demick ... Janine Boitard (as Irina Demich)
Fred Dur Fred Dur ... U.S. Army Ranger Major
Edit

Storyline

In 1944, the U.S. Army and Allied forces plan a huge invasion landing in Normandy, France. Despite bad weather, General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the okay and the Allies land at Normandy. General Norma Cota travels with his men onto Omaha Beach. With much effort, and lost life, they get off the beach, traveling deep into French territory. The German military, due to arrogance, ignorance and a sleeping Adolf Hitler, delay their response to the Allied landing, with crippling results. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

42 STARS IN THE LONGEST DAY See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | History | War

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

During the filming of the landings at Omaha Beach, the American soldiers appearing as extras didn't want to jump off the landing craft into the water because they thought it would be too cold. Robert Mitchum (Gen. Norm Cota) was so disgusted with them that he jumped in first, at which point, the soldiers had no choice but to follow his example. See more »

Goofs

Near the beginning of the movie Rommel is talking about how he will end the invasion right at the water's edge. They were obviously filmed in studio and then "pasted" against the backdrop of the filmed beach. For a moment, Rommel blinks out and disappears and then reappears against the backdrop. See more »

Quotes

Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Vandervoort: I don't think I have to remind you that this war has been going on for almost 5 years. Over half of Europe has been overrun and occupied. We're comparative newcomers. England's gone through a blitz with a knife at her throat since 1940. I'm quite sure that they, too, are impatient and itching to go. Do I make myself clear?
Capt. Harding: Yes, sir. Quite clear.
Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Vandervoort: 3 million men penned up on this island all over England in staging areas like this. We're on the threshold of the most crucial day of our times. 3 ...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

Although the end credits begin with the phrase "in alphabetical order", John Wayne is listed last even though he is not last alphabetically (although he was "nearly" last). See more »

Alternate Versions

The version that was shown on Swedish TV in the early 90's lacked any original subtitling (e.g "Generalfedtmarshall Gerd von Rundstedt, OB West") whatsoever including the film's title! See more »

Connections

Spoofed in The Shortest Day (1963) See more »

Soundtracks

Lambeth Walk
(uncredited)
Music by Noel Gay
Lyrics by Douglas Furber
Sung by the British soldiers on the glider
See more »

User Reviews

The last good WW2 film made by people "who were there"
12 April 2004 | by Buck_ThrusterSee all my reviews

This is perhaps one of the most ambitious, epic WW2 films to have been made; certainly it is the last of the classic B&W films made about the subject. Featuring an all-star cast (John Wayne, Richard Burton, Kurt Jurgens... even a cameo by Sean Connery!), it comprehensively details the build-up and execution of the Normandy landings in 1944, taking care to show how the event was perceived by Allied and Axis soldiers and commanders, as well as the Free French resistance. This is a film that takes great care in documenting the events of the day, without lapsing into sickly sentimentalism or getting distracted with fictional characters' personal lives (a failing of many WW2 movies since about 1970), or over-emphasising any one nation's importance in the operation (although, admittedly, Canadians may feel a little short-changed).

Classic moments abound, notably the landing at St.Mere-Eglise and the soldier who gets caught in the church steeple, the frustrations of the front-line German commanders and fighters, and the numerous cameos for film nerds to keep track of.

If you want a wartime romance, or an appearance by Matt Damon or Ben Affleck, or long, loving shots of the Stars & Stripes in slo-mo, or a gritty blood'n'guts fest, you'll be disappointed. This film has broader concerns, and was made with much more thoroughness. There is no agenda at work here, pro-war or anti-. It is solely concerned with documenting Operation "Overlord" for the film-going public, and succeeds brilliantly; a shame then, that it has not made the top 50 war films list.

A must-see for any fan of war films.


206 of 224 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 241 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | French

Release Date:

4 October 1962 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Longest Day See more »

Filming Locations:

Bénouville, Calvados, France See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed