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Barry Jenkins Was Indirectly Called the N-Word During ‘Moonlight’s’ Oscar Campaign

  • Indiewire
Barry Jenkins Was Indirectly Called the N-Word During ‘Moonlight’s’ Oscar Campaign
Awards season was fairly kind to Barry Jenkins two years ago, with at least one notable exception. The “Moonlight” co-writer/director, who’s at Tiff with his new film “If Beale Street Could Talk,” last night recalled an incident in which he was called the N-word by his own driver following the Governors Awards in the lead-up to last year’s Oscars ceremony.

The entire story was transcribed by Vulture and deserves to be read in full:

“During awards season for ‘Moonlight,’ I was at some big party. It was the Governor Awards for the Academy. It’s an amazing event. It’s the event you hear about the least, where they honor all of these folks. The woman who cut Lawrence of Arabia, the editor, she received a lifetime achievement award there. It’s all these cars, everybody’s in tuxedos, and there’s an after-party at the Sunset Tower Hotel.
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter O’Toole movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ ‘The Lion in Winter,’ ‘My Favorite Year’

  • Gold Derby
Peter O’Toole movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ ‘The Lion in Winter,’ ‘My Favorite Year’
On August 2, the legendary Peter O’Toole would have turned 86. One of the most esteemed actors of his generation, he also holds the dubious record of earning the most Best Actor Oscar nominations (eight) without a win. O’Toole’s trophy case isn’t exactly bare — he won three Golden Globe Awards from eight nominations and received an honorary Academy Award for his lengthy career.

And as younger generations begin to discover his work, his reputation has only grown over the years, particularly for his big splash on the world’s film stage for his performance in “Lawrence of Arabia,” work that is astonishing in its complexity.

In honor of this great actor’s birthday, let’s take a photo gallery tour of his career and rank his 12 greatest film performances from worst to best.

SEEHonorary Oscars: Full gallery of acting recipients includes Charlie Chaplin, Peter O’Toole, Angela Lansbury
See full article at Gold Derby »

Peter O’Toole movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Peter O’Toole movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
On August 2, the legendary Peter O’Toole would have turned 86. One of the most esteemed actors of his generation, he also holds the dubious record of earning the most Best Actor Oscar nominations (eight) without a win. O’Toole’s trophy case isn’t exactly bare — he won three Golden Globe Awards from eight nominations and received an honorary Academy Award for his lengthy career.

And as younger generations begin to discover his work, his reputation has only grown over the years, particularly for his big splash on the world’s film stage for his performance in “Lawrence of Arabia,” work that is astonishing in its complexity.

In honor of this great actor’s birthday, let’s take a photo gallery tour of his career and rank his 12 greatest film performances from worst to best.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Remembering Margot Kidder, Iconic Movie Poster Designer Bill Gold and More Reel Important People We Lost in May

Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. John Altamura (?-2018) - Actor. He played the title character in The Toxic Avenger Part II and The Toxic Avenger Part III: The Last Temptation of Toxie, sharing the role with Ron Fazio. He died of a heart attack on May 4. (Bloody-Disgusting) Joseph Campanella (1924-2018) - Actor. He starred in Ben, Silent Running and Meteor. He died of complications from Parkinson's disease on May 16. (Variety) Anne V. Coates (1925-2018) - Editor. She won an Oscar for editing Lawrence of Arabia and was nominated for BecketThe Elephant ManIn the Line of Fire and Out of Sight. She also...
See full article at Movies.com »

Memorial Day tribute: 2018 celebrity deaths include Harry Anderson, Steven Bochco, Milos Forman, John Mahoney

Memorial Day tribute: 2018 celebrity deaths include Harry Anderson, Steven Bochco, Milos Forman, John Mahoney
To honor Memorial Day with a tribute on Monday, Gold Derby takes a look back at celebrity and entertainment deaths so far in 2018. We are continuing to update our memoriam photo gallery above with major celebrity deaths from film, television, theater and music.

For this year, losses have included Oscar winners Milos Forman and Dorothy Malone, Emmy winners Steven Bochco, Reg E. Cathey and Olivia Cole, Emmy nominees Harry Anderson, John Mahoney and Jerry Van Dyke, Oscar-nominated composer Johann Johannsson, and legendary sports announcer Keith Jackson. Here is a brief summary of the careers of 14 people who have died in 2018:

See Over 100 video interviews with 2018 Emmy contenders

Actress Margot Kidder died at age 69 on May 13. She was best known for playing reporter Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in “Superman: The Movie” (1978). She won a Daytime Emmy in 2015 for the children’s TV show “R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Nolan Goes Analog Route to Preserve Celluloid Beauty of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

  • Variety
Christopher Nolan Goes Analog Route to Preserve Celluloid Beauty of ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
To filmmaker Christopher Nolan, the phrase “newly restored” has taken on unfortunate baggage. In the past decade or so, he believes, it has come to mean digital tinkering with classic films, or even “corrections” made on behalf of artists who worked in another time based on mere assumptions about their work.

So when Nolan saw a few reels struck from the original 70mm camera negative of Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 masterwork “2001: A Space Odyssey” — which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year — the gears started turning. What if audiences had access to a genius’s “unrestored” vision in all its analog glory? Furthermore, what if serious efforts were to be put into an increasingly antiquated type of celluloid rehabilitation, one free of the digital realm?

“A lot of the great film-restoration work throughout history was done entirely photochemically, including the mid-1980s release of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ that Steven Spielberg
See full article at Variety »

Now Stream This: ‘Lawrence of Arabia’, ‘L.A. Confidential’, ‘It’, ‘Demolition Man’ and More

(Welcome to Now Stream This, a column dedicated to the best movies streaming on Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and every other streaming service out there.) Here we are again. The time has come for an all-new edition of Now Stream This, your number-one source for streaming recommendations on the plethora of streaming services. This edition is loaded […]

The post Now Stream This: ‘Lawrence of Arabia’, ‘L.A. Confidential’, ‘It’, ‘Demolition Man’ and More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

R.I.P. Anne V. Coates (1925 – 2018)

Legendary British film editor Anne V. Coates has passed away aged 92, with the British Academy of Film & Television Arts breaking the sad news on Twitter:

We're so sad to learn that British film editor Anne V. Coates has died. During her incredible career, Anne was BAFTA-nominated four times for work including The Elephant Man and Erin Brockovich, and received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2007. She will be greatly missed. pic.twitter.com/O2rrtBcs99

— BAFTA (@BAFTA) May 9, 2018

Coates began her career in the 1950s, and received an Academy Award for her work on David Lean’s 1962 classic Lawrence of Arabia, which included one of the most famous edits in film history – a shot of Peter O’Toole blowing out a match which quickly transitions to a majestic desert sunrise.

Coates would receive further Oscar nominations for Becket (1963), The Elephant Man (1980), In the Line of Fire (1993) and Out of Sight (1998), while
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Anne V Coates (1925-2018)

by Nathaniel R

One of Hollywood's most important artists has died. The film editor Anne V Coates who won both a competitive and an Honorary Oscar has died at the age of 92. Her career began in the editing room of 1940s pictures -- she worked on The Red Shoes (!!!) -- but it didn't take her long to become a lead editor. Her first lead editing gigs were in British cinema in the early 50s. Her career really came roaring to life with Lawrence of Arabia (1962) for which she won her first and only competitive Oscar...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Anne V. Coates, Legendary Editor of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and Many More, Has Died at 92

Anne V. Coates, Legendary Editor of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and Many More, Has Died at 92
Anne V. Coates, the editor responsible for the single-greatest match cut in movie history, has died at the age of 92. Coates’ career spanned 60 years, in which she edited scores of films, including Lawrence of Arabia, Out of Sight, and many, many more. The greatest match cut in the history of film was an accident. It […]

The post Anne V. Coates, Legendary Editor of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and Many More, Has Died at 92 appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Anne V. Coates, Rip: How the ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Editor Helped Steven Soderbergh Unlock His Potential as a Filmmaker

Anne V. Coates, Rip: How the ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Editor Helped Steven Soderbergh Unlock His Potential as a Filmmaker
Cinema is unique from other art forms because one has the ability to cut through time and space, connecting images to create new meanings. Editing strategies are often discussed as part of a director’s overall vision, which makes it hard to decipher – without background knowledge – how an editor aids, influences, and sometimes even reinvents the original intentions of the material.

Which brings us Anne V. Coates, whose death on Tuesday capped a 70-year career – stretching from England to the U.S., through a long and varied list of great directors at turning points in their careers. Viewed as a whole, they illustrate a string of shrewd editing strategies that is unparalleled in film history. It’s also a career that didn’t go unrecognized – she won an Oscar for “Lawrence of Arabia” and honorary Oscar in 2016 — but few people can speak to the specifics of her skills.

Coates’ strengths
See full article at Indiewire »

Anne V Coates obituary

Prolific film editor who won an Oscar for her work on Lawrence of Arabia

Anne V Coates, who has died aged 92, edited more than 50 films during a prolific career that lasted for six decades. She was best known for her work on Lawrence of Arabia (1962), for which she won an Oscar. She received further Oscar nominations for Becket (1964), The Elephant Man (1980), In the Line of Fire (1993) and Out of Sight (1998).

Even though she was a niece of J Arthur Rank, founder of the Rank film company, Coates was not allowed to go to the cinema as a child, but in her teenage years she saw film adaptations of such literary classics as Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights and Henry V. She had found the books heavy, even boring, but the powerful effect on her of the cinema versions persuaded Coates that she would like to be a film director, rather than
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Lawrence Of Arabia' editor Anne V. Coates dies at 92

'Lawrence Of Arabia' editor Anne V. Coates dies at 92
British-born filmmaker worked on Becket, The Elephant Man, In The Line Of Fire.

Anne V. Coates, the Oscar-winning editor of David Lean’s Lawrence Of Arabia who earned four other Academy Award nominations, has died. She was 92.

Coates, who died on Tuesday in the Los Angeles area, earned nods for Becket, The Elephant Man, In The Line Of Fire and, most recently, Out Of Sight.

She was born on December 12 1925 in Surrey and embarked on a distinguished career after Lean’s cinematographer Ronny Neames spotted her work on Pickwick Papers and landed her the Lawrence Of Arabia job.

Speaking of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Anne V. Coates Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ Film Editor Was 92

Anne V. Coates Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ Film Editor Was 92
British film editor Anne V. Coates, who won an Oscar for David Lean’s epic film Lawrence of Arabia, has died. She was 92.

BAFTA, which awarded her the organization’s highest honor, a BAFTA Fellowship, tweeted the news of her death. “We’re so sad to learn that British film editor Anne V. Coates has died” BAFTA wrote. “During her incredible career, Anne was BAFTA-nominated four times for work including ‘The Elephant Man’ and ‘Erin Brockovich,’ and received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2007. She will be greatly missed.”

Coates received five Best Film Editing Oscar nominations over the course of her career for Becket (1963), The Elephant Man (1980), In the Line of Fire (1993) and Out of Sight (1998) in addition to her nom and win for Lawrence of Arabia (1962). She also received an Academy Honorary Award, known as a Lifetime Achievement Oscar, in November 2016 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
See full article at Deadline »

Anne V Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor, Dies at 92

Anne V Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor, Dies at 92
Oscar-winning film editor Anne V. Coates, best known for her work on the 1962 epic “Lawrence of Arabia,” has died at 92.

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts shared news of her death on Wednesday.

The English-born editor took home the Academy Award for Best Film Editing in 1963 for her work on the David Lean-directed desert odyssey. She was nominated for an Academy Award four more times in her career, for her work on “Becket” in 1964, David Lynch’s The Elephant Man” in 1980, “Out of Sight” in 1988, and “In the Line of Fire” in 1993.

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 1: 'Everybody Knows' Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

We're so sad to learn that British film editor Anne V. Coates has died. During her incredible career, Anne was BAFTA-nominated four times for work including The Elephant Man and Erin Brockovich, and received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2007. She will be greatly missed. pic.twitter.com/O2rrtBcs99

— BAFTA (@BAFTA) May 9, 2018

Other notable credits include 1965’s “Young Cassidy,” 1968’s “The Bofors Fun” 1974’s “Murder on the Orient Express” and 2000’s “Erin Brockovich.” Most recently, she worked on 2015’s “Fifty Shades of Grey.” Coates was born in southeast England in 1925, and began her career editing short films for church tours. She later became an assistant film editor at London’s Pinewood Studios. Coates grabbed her first editing credit for “The Pickwick Papers” in 1952.

Also Read: Focus Features Acquires Penelope Cruz Drama 'Everybody Knows' in Cannes

BAFTA awarded Coates with its Academy Fellowship, its highest honor, in 2007. Coates went on to become the second editor to ever win a career achievement award from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association in early 2016. “In a way, I’ve never looked at myself as a woman in the business,” Coates told FilmSound.org in 2000. “I’ve just looked at myself as an editor. I mean, I’m sure I’ve been turned down because I’m a woman, but then other times I’ve been used because they wanted a woman editor. “I just think, ‘I’m an editor,’ and I never expected to get paid less because I was a woman. I grew up with three brothers, and I never thought I would get paid less for anything than they did.”

Also Read: Cannes' Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

Coates was married for several years to director Douglas Hickox. She was survived by her three children, sons Anthony and James Hickox, and her daughter, Emma Hickox-Burford — all of which followed Coates into the film business.

Read original story Anne V Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor, Dies at 92 At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Anne V. Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor for ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ Dies at 92

  • Variety
Anne V. Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor for ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ Dies at 92
English-born film editor Anne V. Coates, who won an Academy Award for cutting David Lean’s classic “Lawrence of Arabia,” has died. She was 92.

She earned that 1963 Oscar: In addition to its impressive balance of imposing desert landscapes and vivid human drama (culled from some 31 miles of footage), the nearly four-hour epic contains one of the most famous “match” cuts in movie history, from a shot of Peter O’Toole blowing out a match to a majestic desert sunrise.

Coates went on to receive four more Academy Award nominations, for editing Peter Glenville’s “Becket” (1964), David Lynch’s “The Elephant Man” (1980), Wolfgang Petersen’s “In the Line of Fire” (1993) and Steven Soderbergh’s “Out of Sight” (1988).

Her other credits include “Young Cassidy” (1965), “The Bofors Gun” (1968), “The Public Eye” (1972), “Murder on the Orient Express” (1974), “What About Bob?” (1991), “Chaplin” (1992), “Congo” (1995), “Striptease” (1996) and Soderbergh’s “Erin Brockovich” (2000).

Her more recent credits include “The Golden Compass
See full article at Variety »

Anne V. Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor on 'Lawrence of Arabia,' Dies at 92

Anne V. Coates, Oscar-Winning Film Editor on 'Lawrence of Arabia,' Dies at 92
Anne V. Coates, the five-time Academy Award-nominated film editor who won an Oscar for her work on the 1962 classic <em>Lawrence of Arabia</em> and most recently cut <em>Fifty Shades of Grey</em>, has died. She was 92.

Veteran script supervisor Angela Allen said that Coates died Tuesday at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, and BAFTA <a href="https://twitter.com/BAFTA/status/994198174528102401" target="_blank">tweeted</a> news of her death.

The famed British-born editor also received Oscar nominations for Peter Glenville's <em>Becket</em> (1964), David Lynch's <em>The Elephant Man</em> (1980), Wolfgang Petersen's <em>In the Line of Fire</em> (1993) and Steven Soderbergh's <em>Out of Sight</em> (1988). She then was given ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Sorry, Sony: ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Is Not Your Studio’s Biggest Hit

With $403.7 million as of April 11, Sony declared “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” is its biggest-ever domestic hit, passing the figure “Spider-Man” achieved in its 2002 run. Of course, this is complete nonsense.

Assessing box office without adjustment is like the Labor Dept. calculating the consumer price index without correcting for inflation. Today’s average ticket price bears no resemblance to those of prior decades. And, unlike books and downloads, which track not the price tag but the units sold, North American movies sales are calculated solely by revenue. European cinemas track both admissions and ticket sales, presumably to avoid this problem. The North American system leads to a lot of skewed figures, and announcements like Sony’s.

None of this should diminish the unexpectedly strong response to the “Jumani” sequel. The reboot of the very strong 1995 Robin Williams-starrer doubled the most optimistic expectations with its Christmas release. The film had
See full article at Indiewire »

Omar Sharif Celebrated On Google Doodle In Honor Of His 86th Birthday

  • Uinterview
The Egyptian actor who gained international fame, Omar Sharif, is being celebrated on Google Doodle today, which would have been his 86th birthday. Sharif’s claim to fame was his first international appearance as Sherif Ali in the 1962 film Lawrence of Arabia. Sharif’s role landed him an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Read: Oscars 2018 Best […]

Source: uInterview

The post Omar Sharif Celebrated On Google Doodle In Honor Of His 86th Birthday appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

‘Zorba the Greek’ Star Anthony Quinn Once Personified Diversity in Hollywood

  • Variety
‘Zorba the Greek’ Star Anthony Quinn Once Personified Diversity in Hollywood
Decades before Hollywood got serious about the need for diversity, Anthony Quinn was diversity. This month marks the birthday of the Mexico-born, L.A.-raised actor who played Bedouins, Native Americans, Soviets — and even Mexicans and Americans in his 60-year career. He was the first Mexican-American to win an Oscar, for his supporting performance in “Viva Zapata!” (1952) and won another as French painter Gaugin in “Lust for Life” (1956). His two trademark performances were in “Zorba the Greek” (another Oscar nom) and as an Italian circus strongman in Fellini’s “La Strada.”

Antonio Rodolfo Oaxaca Quinn was born in Chihuahua, Mexico, on April 21, 1915, and began acting in 1936. His rise in Hollywood is especially remarkable considering the times. From 1929-36, the U.S.’ “Mexican Repatriation” program sent those of Mexican descent south of the border (even though many were U.S. citizens) out of fear they were taking jobs from whites. In
See full article at Variety »
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