A newspaper and television station funded by a pharmaceutical company want a sensation, which happens to be the discovery of King Kong on an island. He is captured and brought to Japan, where he escapes from captivity and battles Godzilla.

Directors:

Ishirô Honda (as Inoshiro Honda), Tom Montgomery (as Thomas Montgomery)
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356 ( 171)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Keith Michael Keith ... Eric Carter
Harry Holcombe ... Dr. Johnson
James Yagi James Yagi ... Yutaka Omura
Tadao Takashima ... Osamu Sakurai
Kenji Sahara Kenji Sahara ... Kazuo Fujita (as Keji Sahaka)
Ichirô Arishima Ichirô Arishima ... Mr. Tako
Yû Fujiki Yû Fujiki ... Kinsaburo Furue
Byron Morrow ... Dr. Arnold Johnson
Jun Tazaki Jun Tazaki ... General Masami Shinzo
Akihiko Hirata ... Dr. Shigezawa
Mie Hama ... Fumiko Sakurai
Yoshifumi Tajima Yoshifumi Tajima ... Captain of Fujita's Ship - Japanese version only
Akiko Wakabayashi ... Tamiye
Akemi Negishi ... Chikiro's Mother (Dancing Girl)
Yoshio Kosugi Yoshio Kosugi ... Farou Island Chief
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Storyline

Eric Cater, a reporter for the United Nations, reports on a submarine which collides with an iceberg and frees Godzilla. The news of this soon leads to Mr. Tako, the chairman of a pharmaceutical company, to seek a monster of his own to generate publicity. He sends out an expedition to Farou Island where they discover the god of the island in the form of King Kong. The giant ape is capture and returned to Japan, upon which it escapes and heads off on a collision course straight towards Godzilla. The two rivals soon clash in a giant climatic battle. Written by Scott Hutchins <scottandrewh@home.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The most colossal conflict the screen has ever known! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film introduced Godzilla's more well-known and standardized high-pitched roar (which was actually a mix of two of his original 1954 roars, sped up by several cycles). This was a way to tone down Godzilla's darkness from the previous two movies. This ultimately became Godzilla's roar for the remainder of the Showa Godzilla film series, and was also used in the VS/Heisei and Millennium Godzilla film series, albeit with tweaks. See more »

Goofs

After Kong throws pieces of the gate at the giant octopus, the camera moves to the side, but the wood superimposed onto the screen is static, it seems to follow the camera. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
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Crazy Credits

In the credits for the U.S. version, actor Kenji Sahara is listed as "Keji Sahaka." See more »

Alternate Versions

In the original version, King Kong vs. Godzilla, the action shifts back and forth between Tokyo and the Seahawk submarine, culminating with the collision with the iceberg. In the U.S. version, the submarine sequence is shown in one continuous sequence ending with Godzilla's appearance. See more »

Connections

Followed by Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965) See more »

User Reviews

 
King Kong turns Japanese
23 February 2006 | by violencegangSee all my reviews

Before Freddy VS Jason, before Aliens VS Predator, even before the clash of the titans that is Puppet Master VS Demonic Toys (but after Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man, obviously), there was King Kong VS Godzilla.

Before I proceed with this review, I should point out that the version I have seen is the American one, which is dubbed and had several scenes added featuring a United Nations news broadcast. The original Japanese release was apparently much more satirical in tone, whereas the American version removes all the comedy. It is still enjoyable as a giant monster movie, though.

This movie originally began life as a stop-motion feature entitled KIng Kong VS Frankenstein, and was conceived by Willis O'Brien as a sequel to the 1933 Kong, gradually turning into a Godzilla movie after Toho studios got involved. Although there are some brief stop-motion sequences, it is by and large a typical kaiju ega movie (in other words, it's men in rubber suits). While fans of O'Brien's still-impressive stop-motion work on the original King Kong may be irked by the idea of the big ape being played by a Japanese guy in a suit, I personally think Kong looks pretty cool (it's certainly more impressive than the suit Toho used for their second Kong film, King Kong Escapes).

There are some inconsistencies, most notably the fact that King Kong and Godzilla were radically different sizes in their respective films, but Toho got around this by the simple expedient of ignoring it. We've got two great big monsters beating each other up, so who cares about details? Also, in the original King Kong, the big ape had no special powers beyond being very strong, whereas Godzilla has radioactive breath; Toho addressed this seeming imbalance by having Kong derive strength from electricity, whereas Godzilla is weakened by touching power lines. One point that bugs me a little is the fact that, although this is the third Godzilla film, and the second to feature King Kong, there seems to be no connection to the previous movies. When the two monsters appear, the human characters act as though they have no prior knowledge of them, which seems odd when you take into account Godzilla had twice previously tried to destroy Tokyo, and King Kong did make kind of a mess of New York. King Kong VS Frankenstein was intended as a sequel to the original, but this idea was obviously dropped from the movie it became.

The climactic fight between the two monsters is great fun, sort of a giant sized version of a WWE match, only with more believable physiques and personalities. Kong shoving a tree down Godzilla's throat and the big green guy responding by walloping Kong with his tail are highly entertaining moments; obviously not as spectacular as the scenes of Kong fighting the dinosaurs in either the 1933 original or Peter Jackson's remake, but that's not the point. King Kong VS Godzilla is an enjoyable example of this type of movie; if you're new to the kaiju ega genre, it's an excellent starting point. It's just a shame King Kong VS Frankenstein never got made. Maybe if we all ask Peter Jackson nicely....


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

King Kong vs Godzilla

Country:

Japan | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 June 1963 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

King Kong vs. Godzilla See more »

Filming Locations:

Tokyo, Japan

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Box Office

Budget:

$200,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1970 Toho Champion Festival)

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Japan theatrical release)| Mono (Westrex Sound) (US version)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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