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Agnès Varda, French Filmmaking Icon, Dies at 90

Agnès Varda, French Filmmaking Icon, Dies at 90
Agnès Varda, the French New Wave director and filmmaking icon behind such films as “Cleo From 5 to 7” and “Vagabond,” has died at age 90. Varda passed away from breast cancer at her home in Paris early March 29. The death was confirmed by Varda’s family, who issued a statement saying Varda was “surrounded by her family and friends” at the time of her passing. The family described the filmmaker as a “joyful feminist” and “passionate artist.” Varda’s funeral is expected to take place in Paris on Tuesday.

Varda got her start as a still photographer before making the jump to feature filmmaking with the 1955 drama “La Pointe Courte.” The film, starring Silvia Monfort and Philippe Noiret, is widely considered to be one of the forerunners of the French New Wave.

Varda’s second feature, “Cleo From 5 to 7,” was entered into the Cannes Film Festival and earned her international acclaim.
See full article at Indiewire »

Agnes Varda, French New Wave Film Director, Dies at 90

Agnes Varda, French New Wave Film Director, Dies at 90
Agnès Varda, the pioneering French film director who emerged in the New Wave movement of the 1960s and continued to direct influential work including 2017’s Oscar-nominated documentary “Faces Places,” has died. She was 90.

“The director and artist Agnès Varda died at her home overnight on Thursday of complications from cancer,” her family said in a statement to Agence France-Presse. “She was surrounded by her family and friends.”

In 2017, Varda became the first female director to receive an honorary Academy Award — and one year later became the oldest nominee for a competitive Oscar for co-directing the documentary feature “Faces Places” with French street artist Jr.

Also Read: 'Faces Places' Directors Agnès Varda and Jr Look for Fun in a 'Disgusting' World

An acclaimed photographer, screenwriter, actress and visual artist, Varda first rose to attention with her 1962 movie “Cleo from 5 to 7.”

She followed with other films such as 1985’s “Vagabond,
See full article at The Wrap »

French New Wave director Agnes Varda dies at 90

Varda passed away following a short battle with cancer.

Agnes Varda, the Belgian-born director whose work played a pivotal part in the French New Wave, has died aged 90.

According to a statement from her family given to Afp, she passed away following a short battle with cancer. It said: ”The director and artist Agnès Varda died at home on Thursday night due to cancer, with her family and loved ones surrounding her.”

He final film, Varda By Agnès, premiered at the Berlin Film earlier this year, where it was awarded the Berlinale Camera award.

In 2017 she became the first female
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Beijing Festival Unveils ‘Mad Max,’ ‘Bourne,’ Kurosawa Screening Series

  • Variety
Beijing Festival Unveils ‘Mad Max,’ ‘Bourne,’ Kurosawa Screening Series
The upcoming Beijing International Film Festival will give space to high-profile Hollywood franchise movies with screenings of all films in both the “Mad Max” and “Bourne Identity” series. Classic Hollywood fare will also feature prominently in a lineup that, as usual, features an eclectic grab-bag of titles.

The local government-backed festival opens April 13 and runs through April 20.

The list of films nominated in the festival’s competition section, and jury members has not yet been released. Winners of the Tiantan (Temple of Heaven) Award will be announced at the closing ceremony.

Since this year is the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, the theme of both the opening and closing ceremonies will be “home and country,” the festival said on its website, so as to make the event “a birthday blessing for the motherland.”

This benediction is so far scheduled to include “Mad Max” (1979), “Mad Max 2” (1981), “Mad Max:
See full article at Variety »

"Une aventure artistique unique" by Anne-Katrin Titze and Agnès Varda

Jacques Demy, Agnès Varda, Michel Legrand, and Catherine Deneuve on the set of The Young Girls Of Rochefort Photo: Agnès Varda

Three-time Oscar-winning composer Michel Legrand has died today in Paris at the age of 86. Legrand's first Oscar was for the song The Windmills Of Your Mind, lyrics by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman, from Norman Jewison's The Thomas Crown Affair and he won again with the Bergmans for the score of Barbra Streisand's Yentl. On his own he won a best original score Oscar for Robert Mulligan's Summer Of '42.

Jacques Demy and Michel Legrand at the harbour Photo: Agnès Varda

Michel Legrand's most famous collaborations were with Jacques Demy for Lola, Bay Of Angels, The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg, The Young Girls Of Rochefort, and Donkey Skin and Agnès Varda's Cleo From 5 To 7 (Cléo de 5 À 7).

Upon hearing of the great composer's passing, Agnès
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Loft Film Festival 2017

The Loft Film Festival 2017
Better than ever, now in its seventh year, the spectacular program with its filmmaking guests and a committed community of dedicated and intellectually alive filmgoers invigorates the mind and activist tendencies already in play.

Take for instance, University of Arizona Professor Noam Chomsky, one of the most influential public intellectuals in the world, speaking with Regents’ Professor Toni Massaro about social justice and the environment. Here he is, in person, being honored as every word he speaks is treated as a jewel. Considered the founder of modern linguistics, Chomsky has written more than 100 books, his most recent being Requiem for the American Dream: The 10 Principles of Concentration of Wealth & Power. An ardent free speech advocate, Chomsky has published and lectured widely on U.S. foreign policy, Mideast politics, terrorism, democratic society and war. Chomsky, who joined the UA faculty this fall, is a laureate professor in the Department of
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars

The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars
“Shitty is shitty,” new Academy governor Whoopi Goldberg told me of the vote to expel a member for the second time in AMPAS’ 90-year history. As everyone in Hollywood struggles to keep their head straight amid a flood of sexual harassment scandals, this year’s crop of Oscar contenders braved Hollywood and Highland traffic snarls to charm a room full of Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) members, including the 54 Governors who voted for this year’s five Honorary Oscars, presented at the 9th (untelevised) Governors Awards.

Behind the scenes, Oscar campaigners had pushed their clients as presenters. Clearly, it was a no-brainer to put Jennifer Lawrence (“mother!”) on stage to present to her “Hunger Games” costar Donald Sutherland (“M.A.S.H.,” “Klute,” “Don’t Look Now”), who never scored one Oscar nomination. “It’s odd that he never won an Oscar,” said Lawrence, thanking him for his generosity and
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars

  • Indiewire
The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars
“Shitty is shitty,” new Academy governor Whoopi Goldberg told me of the vote to expel a member for the second time in AMPAS’ 90-year history. As everyone in Hollywood struggles to keep their head straight amid a flood of sexual harassment scandals, this year’s crop of Oscar contenders braved Hollywood and Highland traffic snarls to charm a room full of Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) members, including the 54 Governors who voted for this year’s five Honorary Oscars, presented at the 9th (untelevised) Governors Awards.

Behind the scenes, Oscar campaigners had pushed their clients as presenters. Clearly, it was a no-brainer to put Jennifer Lawrence (“mother!”) on stage to present to her “Hunger Games” costar Donald Sutherland (“M.A.S.H.,” “Klute,” “Don’t Look Now”), who never scored one Oscar nomination. “It’s odd that he never won an Oscar,” said Lawrence, thanking him for his generosity and
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Faces Places’ Review: Agnès Varda Takes a Joyful Artist’s Journey Into Rural France

  • The Wrap
‘Faces Places’ Review: Agnès Varda Takes a Joyful Artist’s Journey Into Rural France
Agnès Varda is here to make friends. She’s pretty good at it, too. At 89, the legendary director, a major figure of France’s nouvelle vague of the 1960s, has had a lifetime of practice: she enticed audiences with classics like “Cleo from 5 to 7” and “Vagabond,” and, for the past two decades charmed a new generation with her intimate, first-person documentaries “The Gleaners and I” and “The Beaches of Agnes.” (She’s receiving a Governor’s Award from the Oscars this year for her lifetime of filmmaking achievement.) And through it all, she’s maintained relationships even with notoriously difficult people.
See full article at The Wrap »

Agnes Varda Tells Us Why ‘Faces Places’ Could Be Her Last Film

Agnes Varda Tells Us Why ‘Faces Places’ Could Be Her Last Film
Many people associate the first stirrings of the French New Wave with the chic formalism of Jean-Luc Godard and the whimsical storytelling of Francois Truffaut, but Agnes Varda got there first. The seminal member of the New Wave’s “Left Bank” made her feature-length debut with 1955’s “La Pointe Courte,” the freewheeling portrait of a small fishing village far from the city life. That was four years before Truffaut’s “The 400 Blows” and Godard’s “Breathless.” Truffaut died decades ago, and Godard’s films have grown increasingly abstract, but Varda has never strayed from the focus that put her on the map — humanitarian stories about France’s working class.

At 89, Varda remains more fixated on that theme, so much that she committed what may be her final film to that focus. “Faces Places” marks the latest of her playful non-fiction efforts, in which she stars as the inquisitive centerpiece
See full article at Indiewire »

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Brie Larson — “Unicorn Store”

Unicorn Store

Brie Larson is an Academy Award-winning actress whose credits include “Short Term 12,” “Room,” “The Glass Castle,” and the upcoming “Captain Marvel.” Her short film “The Arm” won the Special Jury Award for Best Comedic Storytelling at 2012's Sundance Film Festival. “Unicorn Store” is her feature directorial debut.

Unicorn Store” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 11.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Bl: Kit is a young artist who is kicked out of art school and takes a job at a temp agency. Once there, she starts receiving these very odd and intricate magical invitations that lead her to a place called “The Store.” She learns that there she can get a unicorn, which has always been her dream since she was a kid. It doesn’t cost anything; she just has to prove she’s worthy of it.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Bl: For me, the idea of going after this unicorn was dreaming the impossible dream.

The fact that I wanted to be an actor for so long and was told “no” so many times kind of made me feel a little crazy; I was like a person going after a unicorn. There were all these people scratching their heads and going, “Why are you doing this? This is obviously never going to work out.”

So, this is, in some ways, an homage to my life and my journey and hopefully a way to inspire others to keep going on their path, whatever their unicorn is.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Bl: It’s not an easy time in the world right now, so I hope that, in the spirit of film’s traditional escapism and a way to dream, this film can do that.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Bl: Making a feature film is a long and hard yet fulfilling process. I garnered so much empathy for the many, many jobs involved in making a feature film and what it takes to get it made.

I wore so many hats in pre-production, production, and post-production. As a director, you have to be deeply involved in every aspect from the costumes and casting to location scouting and sound mixing.

It was a wonderful, informative, challenging, exhausting, and rewarding experience.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Bl: I actually auditioned for “Unicorn Store” about five years ago and didn’t get the part. When I later found out that the film didn’t get made, I decided to go about it in a non-traditional way because the script had really resonated with me.

Around the time that “Room” was coming out, I got the call asking if I was interested in coming on as a director, and this set the rest in motion.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Tiff?

Bl: It’s emotional and meaningful to be back at Tiff sharing this film. It just feels like another piece of my heart is up for viewing at Tiff!

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Bl: One of the most interesting pieces of advice I got recently was to “give it five years.” It’s essentially both good and bad — everything is perspective.

The worst piece of advice was before a callback a number of years ago. I was told to “come back in a short jean skirt.” I hope we’ve moved past that as a community.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Bl: If the traditional ways don’t work, don’t be afraid to go an untraditional route. We are in the business of creativity; utilize that skill set.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Bl: Agnès Varda’s “Cleo from 5 to 7.” It is vastly symbolic. Instead of focusing on major plot points, it’s a film about process. It began my deeper understanding of archetypal images as a supplement to storytelling.

It’s beautifully performed, thoughtful, and engaging.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Bl: Ultimately, if opportunities aren’t handed to us, we will create them for ourselves and continue pushing the limitations.

Directors like Patty Jenkins and Kathryn Bigelow are great examples of this. One just proved that a female director with a female star in a traditionally male-driven genre can be just as successful and formidable. And the other is the only female director to win an Academy Award across nearly nine decades. They continue to tell gritty, true-life stories that many would hesitate to finance or distribute.

As a minority, for better or worse, we are required to work harder and smarter for opportunity. By doing so, we may hopefully ease the way for our peers.

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Brie Larson — “Unicorn Store” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Agnès Varda to Receive Honorary Oscar

Agnès Varda shooting “Lions Love (and Lies…)”: PhotoFest

Agnès Varda is receiving a much-deserved Academy Award. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced via press release that the prolific director will be presented with the Honorary Award at this year’s Governors Awards. Also known as an Honorary Oscar, the award celebrates “extraordinary distinction in lifetime achievement, exceptional contributions to the state of motion picture arts and sciences, or for outstanding service to the Academy.”

Dubbed the “Mother of the French New Wave,” Varda “has experimented with all forms of filmmaking from shorts to documentaries to narrative feature films during her more than 60-year career,” the Academy details. Her first film, 1956’s “La Pointe Courte” is said to have kicked off the New Wave movement and her “Cleo from 5 to 7” is considered a “New Wave classic.” The Belgian filmmaker’s other best-known titles include “Le Bonheur,” “One Sings, the Other Doesn’t,” “Vagabond,” “Jacquot,” and “The Gleaners and I.”

The short film “Les 3 boutons,” docuseries “Agnes Varda: From Here to There,” and autobiographical doc “The Beaches of Agnès” are among Varda’s more recent credits.

Varda is the first and only woman to receive the Cannes Film Festival’s Honorary Palme d’Or. She took home the prize in 2015. She received the Locarno International Film Festival’s Golden Pard award, its lifetime achievement honor, in 2014. A series of Varda’s work screened at BAMcinématek earlier this year.

Faces Places,” Varda’s latest project, will screen at Tiff beginning September 13. The doc follows Varda and co-director Jr as they make their way through rural France, photographing and interviewing the people they encounter. “Faces Places” took home the Golden Eye (L’Oeil d’Or) prize at Cannes 2017.

The Governors Awards will be held November 11, 2017 in Los Angeles.

Agnès Varda to Receive Honorary Oscar was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

9th Annual Governors Awards Recipients Announced – Charles Burnett, Owen Roizman, Donald Sutherland And Agnès Varda

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Tuesday night (September 5) to present Honorary Awards to writer-director Charles Burnett, cinematographer Owen Roizman, actor Donald Sutherland and director Agnès Varda. The four Oscar® statuettes will be presented at the Academy’s 9th Annual Governors Awards on Saturday, November 11, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center.

“This year’s Governors Awards reflect the breadth of international, independent and mainstream filmmaking, and are tributes to four great artists whose work embodies the diversity of our shared humanity,” said Academy President John Bailey.

Born in Mississippi and raised in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, Burnett is an independent filmmaker whose work has been praised for its portrayal of the African-American experience. He wrote, directed, produced, photographed and edited his first feature film, “Killer of Sheep,” in 1977. His other features include “My Brother’s Wedding,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

And the Honorary Oscar Goes To...

Jason from Mnpp here -- the four fine movie folks being given Honorary Oscars this year have been announced and they are (drumroll please) the actor Donald Sutherland, the directors Charles Burnett (Killer of Sheep) and Agnès Varda (Cleo from 5 to 7), and the cinematographer Owen Roizman (The Exorcist). You can read the statement from the Academy right here, which dives into each of this exemplary quartet's many many accomplishments...

... but can I just get a rowdy huzzah for Donald Sutherland in particular, who has long been the recipient one of my fiercest "How Has He Never Been Nominated Before" battle cries? (I mean Six Degrees of Seperation alone.) And heck the 82 year-old actor is still turning in fine work, so perhaps he's still got a shot. Somebody give this truly grand actor a truly great role again, please. (And now that he's off the checklist maybe next year
See full article at FilmExperience »

Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More

Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More
The annual honorary Governors Awards are when Oscar lobbyists see the first results of the season, and this batch is notable for its global diversity: a Belgian woman filmmaker, a Canadian movie star, and an African-American director. The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted September 5, and they go to actor Donald Sutherland, writer-director Agnes Varda, and American independent filmmaker Charles Burnett and cinematographer Owen Roizman.

The statues will be presented November 11 at the 9th annual Governors Awards ceremony at Hollywood & Highland.

“This year’s Governors Awards reflect the breadth of international, independent and mainstream filmmaking, and are tributes to four great artists whose work embodies the diversity of our shared humanity,” said Academy president John Bailey.

Read More:New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

Never nominated for an Oscar, Canadian-born
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More

  • Indiewire
Academy Announces Honorary Oscars, Reflecting Diversity: Agnes Varda, Charles Burnett, and More
The annual honorary Governors Awards are when Oscar lobbyists see the first results of the season, and this batch is notable for its global diversity: a Belgian woman filmmaker, a Canadian movie star, and an African-American director. The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted September 5, and they go to actor Donald Sutherland, writer-director Agnes Varda, and American independent filmmaker Charles Burnett and cinematographer Owen Roizman.

The statues will be presented November 11 at the 9th annualGovernors Awards ceremony at Hollywood & Highland.

“This year’s Governors Awards reflect the breadth of international, independent and mainstream filmmaking, and are tributes to four great artists whose work embodies the diversity of our shared humanity,” said Academy president John Bailey.

Read More:New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

Canadian-born Sutherland began his career — boasting more
See full article at Indiewire »

Venice Film Fest 2017 Women Directors: Meet Katharina Wyss — “Sarah Plays A Werewolf”

“Sarah Plays A Werewolf”

Katharina Wyss is a Swiss filmmaker based in Berlin. She has previously written, directed, edited, and produced commercials and short films “Es war einmal ein König,” “1000 Meilen von Taschkent,” and “Minusland.” “Sarah Plays A Werewolf” (“Sarah joue un loup garou”) marks Wyss’ first feature. She’s currently writing her next film.

“Sarah Plays A Werewolf” will premiere at the 2017 Venice International Film Critics’ Week on September 3.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Kw: The film is about 17-year-old Sarah who lives in a small town in Switzerland, is involved in theater, and gets very mixed up with her emotions, fiction, and reality.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Kw: Inexplicable suicides and other unpleasant events happening to female friends in my youth. The ambition to create a very singular experience.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Kw: I’d rather not spoil anybody’s thoughts!

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Kw: Preparing a shoot and then not shooting.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Kw: Swiss Film Funding, national and regional. Swiss Foundations. The team and cast contributing by working for lower wages. And since we didn’t get TV money to close the financing, the German Film and Television Academy (Dffb) joined as co-producer and saved the film by providing technical support.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Venice Film Festival?

Kw: That a work of many years will see the light of the day in a friendly and inspiring environment. The team from the Venice Critics’ Week are wonderful people.

That I can offer the many great people who’ve been working on this film — team and actors — the audience I think they deserve.

That my work and artistic efforts are getting recognition.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Kw: Best: Find yourself a co-author.

Worst: A young woman like you shouldn’t make a film about such a dark subject.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Kw: None! They need jobs, equal pay, equal budgets.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Kw: There isn’t just one, but these are three films that were in my mind during the making of my film: “Saute ma ville” by Chantal Akerman, “Cléo de 5 à 7” by Agnès Varda, and “Une vraie jeune fille” by Catherine Breillat.

Because they are beautiful and reckless and funny!

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Kw: I have to be optimistic!

Mastery is achieved through work and experience, so here’s my suggestion: Give 50 percent of all the jobs — big budget jobs, too — funding, and main competition slots to women, and offer them equal pay. If the art of cinema should be dead after 10 years of strictly applying this rule, because the women all made such bad films, change the rule again.

Venice Film Fest 2017 Women Directors: Meet Katharina Wyss — “Sarah Plays A Werewolf” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: Chris Marker, Scary Movies, Agnès Varda & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Hitchcock and Altman play for “Welcome to Metrograph,” while Annie is scheduled.

Chris Marker’s films screen in a series, as does the work of Alain Tanner.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

The exhaustive, potentially exhausting “Scary Movies X” is underway.

BAMcinematek

The Edgar Wright-curated crime series and camp-centered cinema showings are ongoing.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes 2017 Review: Faces Places, A Delightful and Poignant Capture of Working Life

The Grand Dame of French cinema, Agnès Varda's work has ranged from the New Wave in Cleo from 5 to 7, to feminism and friendship in One Sings, The Other Doesn't, to documenting the life of the poor in The Gleaners and I. Her recent work has had a more introspective feel, and she continues somewhat in this vein in her new film. A joyous and bittersuite look at the role of art in everyday life and work, as well as the role of the artist in society, Faces Places is a wonderful addition to Varda's canon, an expansion of her work in self-reflection and her love and attention to French rural and working life. Varda and photographic graffiti artists Jr, having only recently met, team up...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
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