6.9/10
986
24 user 8 critic

Call Me Genius (1961)

The Rebel (original title)
Tony Hancock gives up his day job to become an artist. He's a lot of enthusiasm, but little talent, and critics dislike his work. Nevertheless, he impresses a talented artist.

Director:

Robert Day
Reviews
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tony Hancock ... Anthony Hancock
George Sanders ... Sir Charles Brewer
Paul Massie ... Paul Ashby
Margit Saad ... Margot Carreras
Grégoire Aslan ... Aristotle Carreras
Dennis Price ... Jim Smith
Irene Handl ... Mrs. Crevatte
John Le Mesurier ... Office Manager
Liz Fraser ... Waitress
Mervyn Johns ... Manager of Art Gallery, London
Peter Bull ... Manager of Art Gallery, Paris
Nanette Newman ... Josey
Marie Burke ... Madame Laurent
Bernard Rebel Bernard Rebel ... Art Dealer
Sandor Elès ... Artist
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Storyline

Tony Hancock gives up his day job to become an artist. He's a lot of enthusiasm, but little talent, and critics dislike his work. Nevertheless, he impresses a talented artist.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

From London's "Bowler-Hatted" Conformity to Paris' Left Bank Madness! (US release: Call Me Genius) See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The working title was "One Man's Meat". See more »

Quotes

Hancock: It's a self portrait.
Mrs. Crevatte: Who of?
Hancock: Laurel and Hardy!
See more »

Crazy Credits

The producers wish to acknowledge the fullest co-operation accorded - somewhat apprehensively - by BRITISH RAILWAYS. See more »

Connections

Featured in John Le Mesurier: It's All Been Rather Lovely (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

At Last ! At Last !
(L'Âme des Poètes)
(uncredited)
Music by Charles Trenet
French lyrics by Charles Trenet
English lyrics by Florence Miles
See more »

User Reviews

great fun
8 October 2001 | by didi-5See all my reviews

This one is a long-time favourite for its great one-liners, its wit, its bright colours and the sheer joy of its performances. George Sanders plays the creepy critic with the same finesse he'd done many times before, Hancock as the leader of the Infantile school of painting is so preposterous its hysterical, even a very young Oliver Reed appears briefly in the cafe scene. The writing of Galton and Simpson is as sharp as ever but gets to take more detours and turns than it ever could in the Half-Hours ... a brilliant film. I particularly love the pathetic painting of the foot which crops up at the art exhibition and that hideous sculpture. Excellent.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 March 1961 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Call Me Genius See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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