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Why Jeanne Moreau’s Death Represents the Decline of French Film in America

  • Indiewire
Iconic actress Jeanne Moreau’s death this week at 89 received muted American coverage, with remembrances that hardly captured Moreau’s essential presence and influence in world cinema. Overshadowed by the passing of Sam Shepard the day before (more contemporary, American, prominent in multiple fields, and younger), she received back-page obituaries in major papers. Her lack of any Oscar nominations, or a deserved honorary award, didn’t help the cause.

Even more unfortunate is the treatment of her death reflects American audiences’ ever-increasing disinterest in French-language film. Jeanne Moreau is significant for her transcendent artistry and the directors with whom she worked, but she also represented the iconic qualities of her country’s cinema.

Though the boom in “art houses” (a term popularized in the late 1940s) came more from Italian films (“Rome, Open City,” “Shoe Shine,” and particularly “Bicycle Thief”), French film became a steady part of the subtitled market by the mid-1950s.
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Jeanne Moreau (1928-2017)

by Nathaniel R

Jeanne Moreau in Bay Of Angels (1963)

The greatest French New Wave icon Jeanne Moreau has passed away at 89 years of age. I didn't immediately understand the fuss over her in my earliest years of cinephila. That's no reflection on the silver screen goddess herself but rather a byproduct of my uncommon disinterest in François Truffaut's classic Jules et Jim (1962) in which Moreau is the object of both titular men's affections. That movie reliably excites almost everyone who shares the affliction of cinephilia so I can't say why it did so little for me!

But one day, nine years ago, my dear friend Vern who had been experiencing back pain and whose wife was off travelling somewhere brought over Bay of Angels (1963) for me to watch...
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Why Jeanne Moreau Was One of the Greatest French Actresses of All-Time

Why Jeanne Moreau Was One of the Greatest French Actresses of All-Time
Jeanne Moreau was to French cinema as Manet’s “Olympia” was to French painting — the personification of the gait, glance, and gesture of modern life. Her darting brown eyes and enigmatic moue were the face of the French New Wave. Her candid sensuality and self-assurance, not to mention the suggestion that she was always in control, made her the epitome of the New Woman. From Orson Welles and Luis Bunuel to Joseph Losey and Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Moreau was the muse to the greatest directors of world cinema.

“She has all the qualities one expects in a woman,” quipped Francois Truffaut, director of her most beloved film, “Jules and Jim” (1962), “plus all those one expects in a man — without the inconveniences of either.”

Surprisingly, this quintessence of French femininity had an English mother, a dancer at the Folies Bergere. Her French father, a hotelier and restaurateur, upon learning that his daughter likewise had theatrical ambitions,
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Rip Jeanne Moreau, Great Lady of French Cinema

French actor and filmmaker Jeanne Moreau, known for films such as Jules and Jim, The Trial, The Bride Wore Black, La Femme Nikita, died today at her home in Paris, at the age of 89, according to her agents. While French actors might have a reputation for perfecting the art of 'cool', it could be said that it was Moreau's work that began this. Daughter of a French restauranteur and an English dancer, she got into acting in the 1950s. Her first big break came when she appeared in Louis Malle's films Lift to the Scaffolding where she took a precarious walk to the sublime music of Miles Davis, and The Lovers (both 1958). But it was in Jules and Jim, about a woman caught...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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Jeanne Moreau: the intelligent, complex star who lit up the French New Wave

The Jules et Jim star had a world-weary presence that created a space for a new type of female actor in French film. Above all she was a great screen star

Related: Jeanne Moreau, star of Jules et Jim, dies aged 89

Jeanne Moreau is probably best known for a movie in which she was perhaps most atypically cast – as Catherine, the entrancing free spirit who has ensnared two men in François Truffaut’s sensational hit Jules et Jim (1962). But in that movie she was no mere ingenue. Moreau was 35 years old, an established star of the French stage and hardly a newcomer to movies. She had a worldly intelligence and sensuality in Jules et Jim that outranked her suitors. It was a clue to the potency and poignancy of her part in that love triangle.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jeanne Moreau, Star of Jules et Jim and French Film Icon, Dies at 89

Jeanne Moreau, Star of Jules et Jim and French Film Icon, Dies at 89
Actress Jeanne Moreau, an icon of French New Wave cinema who went on to become an international film star, has died in Paris, according to Afp. She was 89.

While cause of death has not been disclosed, reports in French media indicate she was found Monday morning in her apartment on Faubourgh-St.-Honoré by a maid.

French president Emmanuel Macron paid tribute to the late star on his twitter early Monday morning, calling her a “movie and theater legend” who was “engaged in the whirlwind of life with absolute freedom.”

The star of François Truffaut’s classic 1962 film Jules et Jim,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Jeanne Moreau, Award-Winning French Actress, Dies At 89

French actress Jeanne Moreau, a smoky-voiced femme fatale who starred in Francois Truffaut’s love triangle film “Jules and Jim” and whose award-winning, seven-decade career included work with some of the world’s most acclaimed directors, has died. She was 89. The French president’s office announced her death in a statement Monday without providing a cause. An assistant […]
See full article at ET Canada »

Jeanne Moreau, French Actress Best Known for ‘Jules And Jim,’ Dies at 89

  • The Wrap
Jeanne Moreau, French Actress Best Known for ‘Jules And Jim,’ Dies at 89
Jeanne Moreau, the French actress perhaps best known for her role in “Jules And Jim” and for playing a huge part in the French New Wave, died Monday in Paris. She was 89. According to the New York Times, President Emmanuel Macron confirmed the news. On Twitter, he referred to her as a “legend of cinema and theater.” Moreau got her start in 1947 on the stage, eventually making her way to the Comédie-Française, a famous theater in Paris. She became one of the theater troupe’s leading actresses. Also Read: Hollywood Celebrates Emmanuel Macron's Win of French Presidency: 'Merci France' She made her.
See full article at The Wrap »

Newswire: R.I.P. Jeanne Moreau, French cinema legend

Jeanne Moreau, the French actress who starred in such films as Jules And Jim and Diary Of A Chambermaid and whose independence, sensuality, and vitality embodied the spirit of the French New Wave, has died. Her death was confirmed by the mayor of Moreau’s home district in Paris, Variety reports. She was 89.

Moreau was an established stage actress plugging away in a series of low-budget B-movies when director Louis Malle cast her in his feature-film debut, Elevator To The Gallows, in 1958. The pair immediately followed that film with another project, The Lovers (1958), the film that made Moreau an international star. She followed that role with starring turns in films like Roger Vadim’s Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1959), Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte (1961), and François Truffaut’s Jules And Jim (1962), the first of several collaborations between Truffaut and Moreau and one of the great classics ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Jeanne Moreau obituary

Queen of the French New Wave who combined sharp intelligence and smouldering sexuality

With her sensual, pouting mouth, her Gauloises-saturated voice, and her combination of sharp intelligence and smouldering sexuality, Jeanne Moreau, who has died aged 89, seemed to many the embodiment of French womanhood. Although by the early 1950s she was established on stage, Moreau achieved screen stardom only with her 20th film, Louis Malle’s first solo feature, Lift to the Scaffold (1958), as an actor who represented the spirit of emerging feminism. Her status was consolidated in Malle’s The Lovers, released later the same year, and reached a peak as Moreau, queen of the French New Wave, took the role of Catherine, object of the affections of the best friends of the title in François Truffaut’s Jules et Jim (1961).

According to the critic Derek Malcolm: “Moreau was the perfect choice for Catherine: she gives a performance
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jeanne Moreau: a life in pictures

French actor Jeanne Moreau has died at the age of 89. Best known for her role in François Truffaut’s New Wave classic Jules et Jim, she worked with many of the leading art house directors of the time including Louis Malle, Roger Vadim, Michelangelo Antonioni and Luis Buñuel

Read more: Jeanne Moreau, star of Jules et Jim, dies aged 89

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

French actress Jeanne Moreau dies aged 89

French actress Jeanne Moreau dies aged 89
French actress Jeanne Moreau has died aged 89.

She was found dead at her home in Paris, the district’s mayor told AFP.

Moreau’s hugely successful career included roles in Elevator To The Gallows and Lovers (both directed by Louis Malle), Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte and Beyond The Clouds, Luis Buñuel’s Diary Of A Chambermaid and Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Querelle.

Her most famous role was perhaps in François Truffaut’s New Wave classic Jules et Jim, a hugely influential international hit.

Moreau won the best actress prize at Cannes for Seven Days… Seven Nights in 1960, a best foreign actress Bafta for Viva Maria! in 1965 and was awarded the Bafta Fellowship in 1996.

She was also honoured with a Cesar for best actress, for The Old Lady Who Walked in the Sea in 1992, and continued acting into her 80s.

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Jeanne Moreau, star of Jules et Jim, dies aged 89

The legendary screen actor became synonymous with the French New Wave, appearing in works directed by Louis Malle and François Truffaut

Read more: Jeanne Moreau – a life in pictures

Jeanne Moreau, the actor best known for her performance in French New Wave classic Jules et Jim, has died aged 89 at her home in Paris, her agent has said.

A director, screenwriter and singer as well as a stage and screen actor, Moreau came to prominence with a series of roles in films considered part of the French New Wave, including Lift to the Scaffold and Jules et Jim. She also appeared in a number of Hollywood films, such as The Last Tycoon and Orson Welles’s adaptation of Franz Kafka’s The Trial.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Death of Jeanne Moreau at 89 by Richard Mowe - 2017-07-31 11:07:26

Jeanne Moreau at the Cannes Film Festival in 2005 Photo: Richard Mowe

The iconic French actress Jeanne Moreau has died aged 89, it was announced in Paris today by her agent.

The actress, singer, screenwriter and director was best known for starring in the François Truffaut film Jules Et Jim in 1962 and Louis Malle’s Lift To The Scaffold.

She was the recipient of multiple lifetime achievement awards, including a BAFTA fellowship awarded to her in 1996, and served on the jury of the third edition of the European Film Awards when they were held in Glasgow in 1990 during the city’s reign as European City of Culture. She was awarded a European Film Academy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.

She was a friend and collaborator of many other of the most recognisable figures in French cinema, including Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet and Marguerite Duras.

Jeanne d'Hauteserre, mayor of the 8th arrondissement in Paris,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

All These Stories We Simply Can't Understand

Every so often, usually while walking around Toronto on a busy day, I'll be struck by the vividness and accuracy of Agnès Varda's singular portrayal of a day in the life (barely two hours, really, making it even more remarkable) spent in the various layers and spaces of the urban environment. I speak, of course, of Cléo from 5 to 7, Varda's 1962 classic and the first film of hers I fell in love with. In those instances, I'll find myself returning to the moments I've cherry-picked as my favorites over the years, skipping across the linear sequence of events that follow the titular singer (Corinne Marchand) across Paris as she waits for the results from a medical examination within the film's designated timeframe (minus half an hour, as the film famously ends at the ninety minute mark). More than for any other film, engaging in these mental replays feels very much like replaying the events of a day I had once experienced myself long ago—albeit one that I’ve been able to revisit and come to know nearly by heart, complete with all of my favorite moments and details waiting in their proper places, so often have I gone back to that June 21st in Paris, 1961.Varda has even made it relatively easy for anyone who wishes to explore and investigate to their heart's content the events of that fateful first day of summer from so long ago now, not only by making such a crisp cinematic itinerary of the various locations visited in the film itself, but also by helpfully providing a map in her book Varda par Agnès complete with a color-coded legend indicating the locations of key scenes from the film, practically inviting the reader to recreate Cléo’s journey for themselves on the streets of present-day Paris. At once attentive and relaxed in its tour of the city (mainly focused in the Left Bank), Cléo is ably conducted in a number of different registers: as an uncommonly lovely essay-poem on the ebb and flow of urban life, an at-times somber meditation on the precarious balance between life and death, and a revealing and honest study of female identity and the ways it is scrutinized and distorted in the public’s relentless gaze. In a feat of remarkable economy and resourcefulness, the film was shot in chronological order across a five-week period, beginning on the date of the story’s events, synchronized as closely as possible to the times in the day Cléo experiences them, in keeping with narrative fidelity and proper quality of light for each scene. Neatly arranged into thirteen chapters, each with its duration clearly stated so we can easily keep track in real time, Cléo’s lucid odyssey through the various public and private spaces that make up her day is observational cinema at its most fertile, free, and magically attuned to its subjects, partly the result of Varda and her team’s carefully planned and executed shoot, partly that of simply being in the right places at the right times.Together, the films of the French New Wave make up one of the most valuable and immersive audiovisual documents of a specific time and place in history—namely France in the late 1950s and early 1960s—that we have. This is especially true of the Paris-situated films, which create the alluring image of an interconnected network of overlapping stories concentrated in a single city. The sharing of certain actors, cinematographers, writers, composers, and other key artists and technicians across different films by different directors especially helped make the impression of one Paris holding an eclectic anthology of New Wave tales. This perception was further reinforced by the cheeky self-referential winks and nods that so many of the New Wave directors—Jean-Luc Godard in particular—lovingly included in their films as gestures of solidarity and support with their nouvelle vague comrades. This is why the eponymous hero of Jean-Pierre Melville’s Bob le flambeur, noted by many as a crucial New Wave precursor, gets name-checked by Jean-Paul Belmondo in Godard’s Breathless, why Truffaut muses Marie Dubois and Jeanne Moreau both pop up in A Woman Is a Woman, with Moreau getting asked by Belmondo how Jules and Jim is coming along, and why Anna Karina’s Nana glimpses a giant poster for the same Truffaut film as she is being driven to her fate in the final moments of Vivre sa vie.Varda got in on the fun herself in Cléo from 5 to 7 not only by casting Michel Legrand, who provided the film with its robust score, as Cléo’s musical partner Bob (a part that gives the legendary composer a substantial amount of screen time and amply shows off his incandescent charm), but also by extending the invitation to Godard, Karina, Sami Frey, Eddie Constantine, Jean-Claude Brialy, producer Georges de Beauregard, and Alan Scott, who had appeared in Jacques Demy’s Lola. They all show up in Les fiancés du pont Macdonald, the silent comedy short-within-the-film that serves triple duty as a welcome diversion for our stressed heroine, a loving cinephilic tribute to the legacy of Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd, and an irresistible, bite-sized New Wave party. And yet I find Cléo to be perhaps the most enchanting of all the New Wave films not for the aesthetic commonalities and cleverly devised linkages that bind it to The 400 Blows, Breathless, Paris Belongs to Us, and its other cinematic brethren, but rather for the tapestry of curious details that root it in its specific time and place and entice on the power of their inherent uniqueness and beauty. “Here,” Varda seems to say as she follows Cléo across the city, “let’s have a look at these interesting people and places on this first day of summer here in Paris, and see what we can see after watching them for a while.” The film’s opening scene continues to extend this invitation as it draws us in closer. It shows us, through the sepia-hued Eastmancolor that deviates from the rest of the film’s silvery monochrome and the “God’s eye” overhead shots (long before Martin Scorsese and Wes Anderson adopted the technique as their own), the cryptic spectacle of Tarot cards being shuffled, placed down, and turned over to reveal the story of Cléo’s potential fate before we’ve even gotten a chance to properly meet Cléo herself. The slightly macabre illustrations to which Varda and cinematographer Jean Rabier dedicate their tight close-ups and the elderly card reader’s accompanying explanations of their meanings lend an air of prophecy to the events to come while also fueling Cléo’s anxiety surrounding her fate (when pressed for a clearer forecast of the future through a palm reading, the reader’s evasive response is less than inspiring). This introduction effectively locks us into Cléo’s perspective, preparing us for the next hour and a half that we will spend quietly observing as, following her distraught exit from the reader’s apartment, she grapples with her fears and insecurities, contemplates and revises her appearance and the identity behind it (tellingly, we discover late in the film that Cléo's real name is Florence), and comes to terms with the ultimately fragile nature of her own mortality. In our allotted chunk of time with her, we see the pouty girl-child subtly shift and adjust her attitude, inching a little closer towards a place of earned maturity, grace, and acceptance regarding her fate, wherever it may take her.Along the way, the film seems to expand to take in as much of the people and places around Cléo as it can. Scene by scene, her Paris makes itself felt and known through key peripheral details: a pair of lovers having an argument in a café near where Cléo sits, listening in; the procession of uniformed officers on horseback heard clip-clopping through the street on the soundtrack and seen reflected in the array of mirrors placed throughout a hat shop; a spider web of shattered mirror and a cloth pressed against a bloody wound, indicating some incident that occurred just before Cléo happened along the scene of the confused aftermath. Other stimuli fill a dazzling program of serendipitous entertainments for us to take in one by one: whirlwind rides in two taxis and a bus, an intimate musical rehearsal in Cléo’s chic, kitten-filled apartment (with Legrand, no less, clearly having a great time, his nimble fingers releasing ecstatic bursts of notes and melodies from Cléo’s piano as if they were exotic birds), the aforementioned silent short, a sculpting studio (the space alive with the indescribably pleasant sound of chisels being tapped at different tempos through soft stone), a frog swallower, a burly street performer who wiggles an iron spike through his arm, and the soothing sights and sounds of the Parc de Montsouris, among a hundred other subtle and overt pleasures scattered throughout this gently orchestrated city symphony, a heap of specificities found and sorted into a chorus of universal experience.Very much in her own way, across a body of work informed by a boundless spirit of generosity, Agnès Varda has gone about carefully collecting and preserving a marvelously varied assortment of subjects throughout her busy life, shedding fresh light on some of the most unlikely (and overlooked) people and places in the world. She refers to her self-made approach to filmmaking as ciné-criture (her own version of Alexandre Astruc's caméra-stylo), which, as we’ve come to know it through Varda’s intensely personal works, is a little like cinema, a little like writing, and uses aspects of both media to make a compassionate, genuine, and wholly original film language. Just as Antoine (Antoine Bourseiller), the dreamy young man whom Cléo encounters in the Parc de Montsouris, translates the world around them into a stream of fanciful observations and flowery speech, so too does Varda, in allegiance with poetry, ditch any semblance of objectivity, going instead for presenting the world simply as she sees it, investing it with her own unmistakable blend of charm, warmth, eloquence, and empathy, all somehow executed with nary a shred of ego or preachiness.“All these stories we simply can’t understand!” randomly exclaims a café patron to her young companion at one point late in Cléo’s journey, perhaps suddenly becoming aware, as we gradually have, of the unfathomable multitude of trajectories that trace themselves across every city every day in a dense tangle of narrative strands. In picking up Cléo’s and diligently following it with her camera for an hour and a half, Varda draws our attention to all those other strands that make up the lives of other people, leading off into their own directions, fated to become entangled with others still. Wisely, deftly, one discovered strand at a time, she helps us better appreciate, again and again, the humble miracle of so many lives coursing and thriving alongside each other, each one special and strange, each rooted in its own distinct flavor of being-ness. Cléo from 5 to 7 in turn roots us in another person’s life for its short time span and ends up giving us a whole universe, casually overflowing with meaning, life, lives, and the myriad details that shape and define them. No, we can’t understand all the stories we come across in a day. But then again, sometimes we don’t really need to understand so much as simply see. See, and accept, and appreciate what is...and then move along to whatever’s next.
See full article at MUBI »

So Link We All

EW reunites the cast of Battlestar Galactica for a panel

Variety Ava DuVernay to deliver the UCLA Commencement address

Awards Daily Jazz interviews RuPaul about the phenomenon of Drag Race 

Towleroad Colton Haynes dishes about his management team in Hollywood who tried to keep him in the closet 

Film School Rejects this needed to be written -- an article on the terrible but now familiar and horrifically disingenuous Hollywood excuse "we didn't make it for the critics but the fans!"

Criterion Closet Barry Levinson (Wizards of Lies, Rain Man) picks some classics from those famous shelves including Jules et Jim and Spartacus and also fantasizes about Orson Welles

Mnpp sound advice for Tom Hardy on that Jafar in Aladdin rumor - Don't Do It. 

i09 the costumes for Black Panther could be a godsend for the black cosplay community

Variety releases a list of 10 comics to watch including John Early (yay), Bollywood star Vir Das,
See full article at FilmExperience »

5 Great Science Fiction Movies to Watch Instead of ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’

5 Great Science Fiction Movies to Watch Instead of ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’
There’s no question that hordes of people will swarm to theaters to see “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” on opening weekend, and most of them will get their money’s worth — it’s yet another visually dazzling comic space opera about intergalactic heroes trading banter in their meandering quest to save the universe. Writer-director James Gunn was already onboard to direct a third entry before this one hit theaters, a signal that this vibrant formula works really well for a lot of people. Unfortunately, the enthusiasm for a big, flashy blockbuster like “Guardians” has the power to overwhelm everything else out there, and drown out memories of other first-rate science fiction storytelling from recent years that still deserves a larger audience. Here are a few of them worth checking out this weekend. Trust us — “Guardians” will be there next weekend, too.

Beyond the Black Rainbow” (2010)

The first (and
See full article at Indiewire »

Laurie Simmons Has a Charming and Cinematic Mid-Life Crisis in Feature Directorial Debut ‘My Art’ — Tribeca Review

Laurie Simmons Has a Charming and Cinematic Mid-Life Crisis in Feature Directorial Debut ‘My Art’ — Tribeca Review
There’s no question that photographer and artist Laurie Simmons has an eye for images, and while her feature directorial debut “My Art” relies heavily on a series of homages to some of cinema’s most beloved features, the newbie narrative filmmaker really impresses in an unexpected arena. Simmons pulls triple duty on the film, writing, directing and starring in the feature, and although she knows how to compose lovely shots and her insight into the art world is keen, it’s her performance as artist Ellie that stands out in an otherwise predictable feature about growing up, no matter your age.

Mashing up mid-life crisis narratives (the film is heavy on the Nancy Meyers influence, down to the shades of “Baby Boom” and an attention to great interior design) with various recreations of classic films that run the gamut from “Some Like It Hot” to “Jules and Jim” and plenty of pictures in between,
See full article at Indiewire »
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