7.2/10
12,895
113 user 40 critic

El Cid (1961)

Trailer
3:27 | Trailer
The fabled Spanish hero Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar (a.k.a. El Cid) overcomes a family vendetta and court intrigue to defend Christian Spain against the Moors.

Director:

Anthony Mann

Writers:

Fredric M. Frank (story), Philip Yordan (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 7 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Charlton Heston ... El Cid Rodrigo de Vivar
Sophia Loren ... Jimena
Raf Vallone ... Count Ordóñez
Geneviève Page ... Princess Urraca (as Genevieve Page)
John Fraser ... Prince Alfonso
Gary Raymond ... Prince Sancho
Hurd Hatfield ... Arias
Massimo Serato ... Fanez
Frank Thring ... Al Kadir
Michael Hordern ... Don Diego
Andrew Cruickshank Andrew Cruickshank ... Count Gormaz
Douglas Wilmer ... Moutamin
Tullio Carminati ... Priest
Ralph Truman Ralph Truman ... King Ferdinand
Christopher Rhodes Christopher Rhodes ... Don Martín
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Storyline

Epic movie of the legendary Spanish hero, Rodrigo Diaz de Bivar (Charlton Heston) ("El Cid" to his followers), who, without compromising his strict sense of honor, still succeeds in taking the initiative and driving the Moors from Spain. Written by Stewart M. Clamen <clamen@cs.cmu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The GREATEST ROMANCE and ADVENTURE in a THOUSAND YEARS! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Time Magazine, this movie required seven thousand extras, ten thousand costumes, thirty-five ships, fifty outsize engines of medieval war, and four of the noblest old castles in Spain: Ampudia, Belmonte, Peñíscola, and Torrelobatón. See more »

Goofs

The interiors are far too bright for medieval castles. See more »

Quotes

Jimena: Can you forgive me, Rodrigo?
El Cid: Jimena.
Jimena: Would you take me with you?
El Cid: But... now I... have nowhere to take you.
Jimena: As long as we are together it will not be nowhere. I love you Rodrigo. I love you.
[They kiss]
El Cid: You know what you risk if you come with me, my love?
Jimena: Since my love is not a man like other men my life with not be like other lives.
El Cid: It's only now, only know that I know... how hard the road would have been without you.
[They kiss again]
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Alternate Versions

In some Muslim countries, the film was nearly banned until the censors thought of a better idea, which was to simply cut out the entire climax of the film, so instead of showing the dead El Cid lead his army to victory against the Moors, they simply ended it at his deathbed. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Remote Control (1988) See more »

Soundtracks

The Falcon and the Dove
(uncredited)
Lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
Music by Miklós Rózsa
Performed by Chorus
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User Reviews

 
This is a keeper
20 April 2008 | by rshepard42796See all my reviews

As a movie El Cid grows on you. At first it is the story of a relatively ordinary man whose trip to his wedding is interrupted by a battle between the Moors and the Christians of 11th century Spain. But this is no ordinary man. Or perhaps he is an ordinary man who is destined to do extraordinary things. Early on he is forced to kill his fiancé's father as a matter of family honor, thus earning the enmity of his fiancé, who nonetheless cannot stop loving him, however hard she tries. And much of the story is devoted to the doomed nature of their love, as historical events continue to overtake the plans they would rather make. And with each new episode El Cid's stature grows, from warrior to hero to legend to mythic figure. Even in exile he has a following. And if the script is not true to history, this film still does a great service to the memory of a great man who put God and country ahead of himself. Something extra must be said about the crowd scenes. There were real people out there, not multiple CGI images made to look like the hordes that are a part of all epics. Over 30,000 costumes were made for this movie and General Franco donated the Spanish army to fill them. The difference is stunning, and sobering. There is a reality to the battle scenes that simply doesn't obtain in later movies such as Gladiator or Lord of the Rings. Now that old films such as this are so readily available in various formats we are presented with the dilemma of deciding which ones should occupy our bookshelves, to return to again, to remember a detail, or to reclaim the feeling that the story may create. In terms of the greatness, the mission and the struggles of the human spirit, this one's a keeper.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Italy | USA

Language:

Italian | Arabic | English | Latin

Release Date:

14 December 1961 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El Cid See more »

Filming Locations:

Sevilla Studios, Madrid, Spain See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,250,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (some 35 mm prints)| 4-Track Stereo (35 mm prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.25 : 1
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