Edit
Babes in Toyland (1961) Poster

Trivia

Many of the sets from this movie - including Mary's garden and fountain, the shoe house, the pumpkin house and the trees from the forest - were on display at Disneyland in Anaheim from November of 1961 through 1962 as a walk-through attraction.
15 of 15 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The stop-motion wooden soldier segment took more than 6 months to film.
14 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This was Annette Funicello's favorite of all her films.
20 of 21 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The toy soldiers also made an appearance in Walt Disney's Mary Poppins (1964) in the nursery sequence and are favorite features of holiday parades in Disney Parks to this day. Disney animator Bill Justice made sure the Park soldiers were identical to the movie counterparts.
12 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This was the first live-action musical that Disney Studios produced. It was as heavily promoted as the studio's other big films, but was a failure at the box office. It was one of the few Disney films never given a second run in the neighborhood theaters, or even re-released, as so many other Disney films were (it first appeared on television - in two one-hour segments telecast a week apart - only eight years after its original release. Eight years was usually the amount of time the Disney studios used to wait to re-release their films theatrically). Disney did not make another musical on this elaborate a scale until Mary Poppins (1964), which became its most successful film during Walt Disney's lifetime.
17 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The voice of Sylvester J. Goose is that of the film's Director Jack Donohue.
10 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ward Kimball was to direct the film originally but left after a falling out with Walt Disney. While Disney was away, Kimball arranged for Ray Bolger to audition and approved set designs, which were considered 'Walt's domain,' and, along with a studio publicist taking out a trade advert that Kimball was unaware of announcing him as the film's director, led to Disney deciding Kimball had got above himself and firing him.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
To promote the movie, the wrap party was scripted and aired on Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color (1954), which had recently been revamped and renamed "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" on a new network, NBC, and filmed in color instead of black-and-white like the old series. The wrap-party episode was hosted by Annette Funicello and Walt Disney himself, who explained clips from the movie while introducing the cast. Also featured was a soft shoe dance by Ray Bolger and a bongo drums solo by Tommy Sands. Ann Jillian performed the song "A Flock of Sheep Named Henry" with Henry Calvin, and Ed Wynn was presented with his Mouscar statuette for 60 years in show business by Tommy Kirk.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Hal Roach original (Babes in Toyland (1934)) starred Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy and had a costumed mouse that looked suspiciously like Mickey Mouse. This Disney remake featured two comic actors obviously impersonating Laurel and Hardy. In fact, Henry Calvin who acted as Gonzorgo in this film impersonated Oliver Hardy when he made a guest appearance in an episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961) where Dick impersonated Stan Laurel.
12 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
After production, the cast and crew presented director Jack Donohue with a jack-in-the-box featuring pictures from the film on the outside and his head popping out when the button was pressed.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This Walt Disney classic has two Original Mouseketeers appearing in the cast. Mouseketeer Annette Funicello and (uncredited) Mouseketeer Eileen Diamond.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This was the only Disney-produced film based on a hit Broadway stage musical, and the first Disney musical using mostly songs which had not been specifically written for the film. However, it is not very faithful to the original 1903 stage version.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This version takes liberties with the original 1903 operetta, but so does the 1934 film with Laurel & Hardy. For example, the characters of Grumio, Rodrigo and Gonzorgo were in this film but not in the L&H one. A side-by-side comparison would likely reveal that the two films are about even in their changes to the stage version.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Film debut of Ann Jillian.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
David Swift was slated to write and direct this film at one point, but he left the project because he couldn't come up with a workable script.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Of the six Disney live-action movies that co-star Tommy Kirk and Kevin Corcoran, this is the only one where they do not play brothers.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film grew out of the abandoned "Rainbow Road To Oz" project that was planned and previewed on Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: The Fourth Anniversary Show (1957). In that unmade film, Annette Funicello was to have played Princess Ozma. When when the studio scrapped the project, this was what took its place. Disney never made an actual Oz film until Return to Oz (1985)
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ray Bolger's second family-oriented musical film. His first major appearance in a family-oriented musical film was The Wizard of Oz (1939) where he performed as The Scarecrow. The Scarecrow was a benevolent character in that film, but Barnaby in this film is a villain.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed