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Garry Marshall Passes Away at 81

His impact on Hollywood cannot be overstated and sadly Garry Marshall died of complications from pneumonia on Tuesday (July 19).

The 81-year-old actor/director/writer/producer was best known for creating “Happy Days” and developing “The Odd Couple” for television as well as directing “Young Doctors in Love,” “Pretty Woman,” “Exit to Eden,” “Runaway Bride,” “The Princess Diaries” and most recently “Mother’s Day.”

Back in 2014, Wgaw President Christopher Keyser sang Marshall’s praises as he presented him with the Wgaw Television Laurel Award- “Garry Marshall’s filmography – from ‘The Joey Bishop Show’ to ‘Happy Days’ – is a virtual history of American television comedy. Both of-their-time and timeless, his shows are a gentle, generous, comic mirror held up to late mid-century America. And no one is a finer or funnier chronicler of friendship – male or female (or alien) – than Garry Marshall. Beloved both for his iconic work and the warmth of his spirit,
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Rip Garry Marshall

  • TheMovieBit
Happy Days. Overboard. Beaches. Pretty Woman. Garry Marshall had a hand in all of these, and it’s with a heavy heart that I report the legendary filmmaker and creator has passed away at the age of 81 due to complications of pneumonia following a stroke. Born in The Bronx in November of 1934, Marshall’s career began as a joke writer for comedians Joey Bishop and Phil Foster, before landing a gig writing for The Tonight Show. This got his foot in the door in the world of television, working on the like of The Joey Bishop Show, The Dick Van Dyke Show, and The Lucy Show, before creating his first t.v. show with Jerry Belson, Hey, Landlord, in 1966. His first contribution to popular culture came in 1974 when he created sitcom Happy Days, which led to two more Marshall created sitcoms, Laverne and Shirley and Mork & Mindy. Having previously had
See full article at TheMovieBit »

Garry Marshall Dies At 81: Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, Mork & Mindy

TV will never be the same. Acclaimed producer Garry Marshall has died at the age of 81. The brother of Laverne & Shirley's Penny Marshall created the Happy Days, Joanie Loves Chachi, Mork & Mindy, and Angie TV shows, and so much more.The Bronx-born son of Marjorie Irene and Anthony Wallace, Marshall began his career as a joke-writer for Joey Bishop. Marshall's other TV series work includes: Blansky's Beauties, The Brian Keith Show, Me and the Chimp, Love American Style, The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Lucy Show, The Joey Bishop Show, and Make Room for Daddy.Read More…
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Garry Marshall to Receive Wgaw Laurel Award

  • The Wrap
Garry Marshall to Receive Wgaw Laurel Award
Happy Days” and “The Odd Couple” creator Garry Marshall will receive the Writers Guild of America, West’s 2014 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Writing, which honors lifetime achievement in oustanding television. The award will be given at the Writers Guild Awards’ West Coast ceremony, which takes place Feb. 1 at the Jw Marriott Los Angeles L.A. Live. Also read: Writers Guild of America, East, ABC News Reach Tentative Contract Agreement Wgaw president Christopher Keyser praised Marshall’s ability to chronicle friendships through his writing while announcing the honor. “Garry Marshall’s filmography – from ‘The Joey Bishop Show’ to ‘Happy Days’ – is a.
See full article at The Wrap »

WGA West To Give Garry Marshall 2014 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award For TV

Los Angeles – Veteran writer-producer-director Garry Marshall, who has been responsible for some of the most popular series in television, including Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, and Mork & Mindy, is set to receive the Writers Guild of America, West’s 2014 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Writing Achievement, honoring lifetime achievement in outstanding television writing. Marshall’s contributions to entertainment will be recognized at the upcoming 2014 Writers Guild Awards’ West Coast ceremony to be held on Saturday, February 1, 2014, at the Jw Marriott Los Angeles L.A. Live. “Garry Marshall’s filmography – from The Joey Bishop Show to Happy Days – is a virtual history of American television comedy. Both of-their-time and timeless, his shows are a gentle, generous, comic mirror held up to late mid-century America. And no one is a finer or funnier chronicler of friendship – male or female (or alien) – than Garry Marshall. Beloved both for his iconic work and the warmth of his spirit,
See full article at Deadline TV »

Garry Marshall Tapped for WGA’s Paddy Chayefksy Award

Garry Marshall Tapped for WGA’s Paddy Chayefksy Award
Garry Marshall — the man behind “Happy Days,” “Laverne & Shirley” and “Mork & Mindy” — will receive the Writers Guild of America West’s 2014 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Writing Achievement.

The honor will be presented at the Writers Guild Awards’ West Coast ceremony on Feb. 1 at the Jw Marriott Los Angeles.

Garry Marshall’s filmography – from ‘The Joey Bishop Show’ to ‘Happy Days’ – is a virtual history of American television comedy,” said WGA West president Christopher Keyser. “Both of-their-time and timeless, his shows are a gentle, generous, comic mirror held up to late mid-century America. And no one is a finer or funnier chronicler of friendship – male or female (or alien) – than Garry Marshall.”

Marshall created or co-created and executive produced “Happy Days” (1974-84), “Laverne & Shirley” (1976-83), “Joanie Loves Chachi,” “Mork & Mindy,” “Angie,” “Makin’ It,” “The Brian Keith Show,” and “Hey, Landlord!”

He also developed “The New Odd Couple.” His other
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Photos from The Joe Besser Film Festival Yesterday in St. Louis

“Not so haaaard!” was uttered several times yesterday as we celebrated the life and career of Joe Besser, the ‘St. Louis Stooge’ at the Esquire Theater in St. Louis. The film festival was part of a campaign to raise awareness in St. Louis that Joe Besser is one of us and to perhaps get him a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

Attendance was strong at the fest yesterday with the crowd skewing older as though are the folks that remember Joe Besser who was born in 1907 and raised here, the 9th child of Morris and Fanny Besser up in Florissant. Joe Besser worked in vaudeville and Broadway and starred in his own comedy shorts for Columbia pictures before joining the Three Stooges in 1955 after Shemp Howard died suddenly. Besser would star in the last 16 Stooges shorts. After that Besser returned to films and television, most notably as
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Joe Besser, the cartoon bio

On Sunday June 9 at 1Pm the AMC Esquire Theatre at 6706 Clayton Road will be ground zero for fans of classic comedy. That’s because it’s the site of the Joe Besser Film Festival. The three hour program will include several highlights from Mr. Besser’s long career. There will be TV clips including segments from “The Abbott and Costello Show” and “The Joey Bishop Show” along with several solo theatrical shorts and, of course, several of his shorts as one of the Three Stooges. To get you in the mood I’m proud to present a biographical comic strip I prepared for a special edition of the St. Louis Globe Democrat newspaper. Enjoy, and I’ll see you there on June 9!
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

R.I.P Henry Gibson 1935-2009

The instantly recognizable and very like-able actor Henry Gibson has died aged 73 after a short battle with cancer.

Henry Gibson, arguably best known for his role as the Neo-Nazi commander hunting the Blues Brothers, was never really a leading actor but always shone in supporting roles in numerous films, most memorable for me were "The Burbs", "Inner Space" and "Magnolia".

Henry Gibson acted in over 130 TV Shows and Films in a career stretching from 1963-2008 starting with "The Joey Bishop Show" and ending with regular appearances as Judge Clark Brown on "Boston Legal" TV Show in 2008.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Veteran Genre Actor Henry Gibson Dies

The world on Wednesday was forced to say good-bye to Henry Gibson, the high-pitched voice comedic actor who knew how to light up the screen in almost any role. Gibson died Monday after fighting cancer. He was 73. Young audiences today likely best know Gibson as Judge Clark Brown in the William Shatner star vehicle "Boston Legal," but his resume is quite extensive, especially when it comes to the world of science-fiction. After appearances on "The Joey Bishop Show," "77 Sunset Strip" and "The Beverly Hillbillies," Gibson found some work in the genre as Napoleon in the 1968 "Bewitched" episode "Samantha's Fresh Pastry." He would return two years later as Tim O'Shanter in "If the Shoe Pinches." Making a name for himself in "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In," Gibson would appear in a couple ...
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'Laugh-In' original Henry Gibson dies

'Laugh-In' original Henry Gibson dies
Henry Gibson, a wry comic character actor whose career included "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In," "Nashville" and "Boston Legal," died Monday at his home in Malibu after a brief battle with cancer. He was 73.

Gibson's breakthrough came in 1968 when he was cast as a member of the original ensemble of NBC's top-rated "Laugh-In," on which he performed for three seasons. Each week, a giant flower in his hand, he recited a signature poem, introducing them with the catchphrase that became his signature: "A Poem, by Henry Gibson."

The poems proved so popular that they led to the release of two comedy albums, "The Alligator" and "The Grass Menagerie," as well as a book, "A Flower Child's Garden of Verses."

After "Laugh-In," he played the evil Dr. Verringer in "The Long Goodbye" (1973), the first of four films in which he appeared for director Robert Altman. Their second collaboration came in "Nashville" (1975), in which
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Ed McMahon dies at 86

Ed McMahon dies at 86
Ed McMahon, who created the trademark "Heeeeeeeere's Johnny!" when he introduced host Johnny Carson for decades on the "Tonight Show," died Tuesday of a "multitude of health problems" at UCLA's Ronald Reagan Hospital, his spokesman said. He was 86.

Known to millions as Carson's steady sidekick on the venerable NBC late-night program, McMahon also hosted the syndicated talent show "Star Search" from 1983-95, served as a prominent commercials pitchman for American Family Publishers sweepstakes and many other products and appeared in films and TV shows.

McMahon's impact could be seen in HBO's "The Larry Sanders Show," where Jeffrey Tambor's talk-show sidekick character is based on him, and in "The Shining," where Jack Nicholson's character shouts "Heeeeeeeere's Johnny!" while attempting to kill his wife with an ax.

McMahon was the friendly sidekick throughout Carson's tenure as "Tonight Show" host from 1962-92. Moving to the couch next to Carson after the show's first commercial,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Comedian Joey Bishop Dies at 89

  • WENN
Comedian Joey Bishop, the last surviving male member of Frank Sinatra's legendary "Rat Pack" who appeared in such films as Ocean's Eleven and Sergeant's 3, died Wednesday night of multiple causes at his home in Newport Beach, CA; he was 89. The Bronx-born Bishop pursued a career in stand-up comedy both before and after World War II, and caught the attention of Sinatra during a Manhattan gig in 1952. Soon after, Bishop was opening for Sinatra's concerts nationwide, and also began appearing in films and on numerous talk shows. He also became a famed member of Sinatra's Rat Pack, which also consisted of Sammy Davis, Jr., Peter Lawford and Dean Martin (Shirley MacLaine is also considered something of an honorary member). The male quintet appeared in the 1960 crime caper Ocean's Eleven, and performed nightly at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas during filming; the next year, Bishop was asked to be the emcee for President John F. Kennedy's inaugural ball (produced by Sinatra). Away from the Rat Pack, Bishop starred for four years in the sitcom The Joey Bishop Show, which ran from 1961-65. He was also a frequent guest, and guest host, for such TV talk show kings as Jack Paar and Johnny Carson, and briefly had his own talk show in the late 60s. Bishop made fewer and fewer appearances throughout the 70s, occasionally popping up on a variety of television shows ranging from Match Game to Murder, She Wrote, and in a few films, the last two being Betsy's Wedding (1990) and Mad Dog Time (1996). Bishop is survived by his son, Larry.

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