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Patricia Barry, ‘Days of Our Lives’ and ‘All My Children’ Star, Dies at 93

Patricia Barry, ‘Days of Our Lives’ and ‘All My Children’ Star, Dies at 93
Patricia Barry, an actress with hundreds of TV credits who was best known for her roles on soaps including “Days of Our Lives” and “All My Children,” died Tuesday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 93.

Barry logged stints on several daytime serials and dozens of roles on TV series from the 1960s through the 1990s. She was also a philanthropist and businesswoman who was successful in fielding rental properties to actors and directors who needed temporary homes while working on location in New York and Los Angeles. She was married for decades to Philip Barry Jr., son of the playwright behind “The Philadelphia Story” and “High Society.”

Barry’s long list of credits include appearances on “Perry Mason,” “Gunsmoke,” “My Three Sons,” “77 Sunset Strip,” “The Untouchables,” “Dr. Kildare,” “Rawhide,” “Ben Casey,” “Maverick,” “The Twilight Zone,” “Three’s Company,” “Dallas,” “Columbo,” and “Knots Landing,” in addition to later series such as “Providence” and “Murder She Wrote
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Everybody Loves Raymond: Doris Roberts Dies at 90; Farewell Marie Barone

[caption id="attachment_47663" align="aligncenter" width="384"] Angela George at flickr.com/photos/sharongraphics/. Permission (Reusing this file.) Otrs Wikimedia./caption]

Actress Doris Roberts has died at the age of 90. An accomplished performer with a C.V. longer than your arm, Roberts assumed her best-known TV role as Marie Barone, on CBS's Everybody Loves Raymond TV series, from 1996 to 2005.

Born Doris May Green, November 4, 1925, in St. Louis, Missouri, the actress took her step-father's surname. Her earliest TV series roles, in the 1950s, were in properties such as Starlight Theatre, Studio One in Hollywood, Suspense, Look Up and Live, 'Way Out, Ben Casey, Naked City, The Defenders, and The Doctors and the Nurses.

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See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Doris Roberts Dies: ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Mom Was 90

TV, film and Broadway actress Doris Roberts, best known as Ray Romano’s (Raymond Barone) mother Marie on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, has died. Her son, Michael Cannata, says Roberts died in her sleep of natural causes Sunday night. She was 90. A St. Louis native, Roberts began her acting career in the early 1950s on TV’s Studio One, going on to appear in such series as The Naked City, Way Out, Ben Casey and The Defenders. She later segued to film in the 1960s and…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Doris Roberts Dies: ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Mom Was 90

Doris Roberts Dies: ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Mom Was 90
TV, film and Broadway actress Doris Roberts, best known as Ray Romano’s (Raymond Barone) mother Marie on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, has died. Her son, Michael Cannata, says Roberts died in her sleep of natural causes Sunday night. She was 90. A St. Louis native, Roberts began her acting career in the early 1950s on TV’s Studio One, going on to appear in such series as The Naked City, Way Out, Ben Casey and The Defenders. She later segued to film in the 1960s and…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90
Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90
Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Doris Roberts, ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Star, Dead at 90

  • The Wrap
Doris Roberts, ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Star, Dead at 90
Doris Roberts, who played Ray Barone’s prying mother on the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died Sunday, a representative for the actress told TheWrap on Monday. She was 90. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1925, Roberts began acting in 1952, appearing on the television series “Studio One.” Appearances on “The Naked City,” “Ben Casey” and “The Defenders” followed. She first appeared on the big screen in the 1961 film “Something Wild.” Roberts’ other film credits include “A Lovely Way to Die,” “No Way to Treat a Lady” and “The Honeymoon Killers.” On television, she also appeared on “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman,”...
See full article at The Wrap »

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73

Actress Margaret Blye, Star of the Original ‘The Italian Job,’ Dies at 73
Actress Margaret “Maggie” Blye, who starred in the original “The Italian Job,” died on March 24 in West Hollywood, Calif., after a two-year battle with cancer. She was 73.

Blye starred in many films and worked with some of the best in Hollywood: the Oscar-nominated film “Summer and Smoke,” starring Laurence Harvey and Geraldine Page, in which she played Dusty; “Hombre” with Paul Newman, Diane Cilento, Barbara Rush, and Richard Boone; “Hard Times” with Charles Bronson and James Coburn; “Waterhole #3” with Carroll O’Connor and James Coburn; “Diamonds for Breakfast” with Marcello Mastroianni; and “Ash Wednesday,” in which she portrayed Kate Sawyer, the daughter of Elizabeth Taylor’s Barbara Sawyer.

In 1969 Maggie starred as Lorna with Michael Caine and Noel Coward in the original version of “The Italian Job.” Subsequent film credits included “The Sporting Club”; “The Final Chapter: Walking Tall”; “Little Darlings,” with Tatum O’Neal and Kristy McNichol; “The Entity
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Willard

“I was good to you, Ben!” Well, that’s true, Willard, up to a point. Daniel Mann’s Willard (1971) makes a few good and satirical points, one being don’t bite the hand that feeds you, especially as that “hand” might bite you right back. Willard kicked off the 70’s Critters Done Wrong By (trademark pending) subgenre, leading to such memorable fodder as Frogs (1972), Food of the Gods (1976), and Day of the Animals (1977). However, Willard stands out from the (rat) pack by keeping it thrills low key and scurrying on the ground.

Produced by Bing Crosby Productions (yes, that Bing) and distributed by Cinerama Releasing Corporation (they also put out The Beast Must Die and Seizure), Willard received good notices, and more importantly to the genre, pulled in over $14 million Us when it was released in June of ’71. Propelled by top notch performances, Willard delivers the vermin to your doorstep.
See full article at DailyDead »

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84
William Bast, who wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two biographies of James Dean, died of complications from Alzheimer’s on May 4. He was 84.

Bast wrote scripts for episodes of series including “Combat!,” “Perry Mason,” “Ben Casey,” “The Outer Limits,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Honey West,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Mod Squad” and “It Takes a Thief.” He also wrote scripts for the BBC and British Independent Television, adapted Jean Giradoux’s play “Tiger at the Gates” for Granada Television and wrote episodes for classic series “The Prisoner.”

In 1976 he received the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for his telepic “The Legend of Lizzie Borden,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery. His 1977 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Man in the Iron Mask,” with Richard Chamberlain in the dual role, was nominated for an Emmy, and in 1982 his script for “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” with Anthony Andrews and Ian McKellen,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84
William Bast, who wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two biographies of James Dean, died of complications from Alzheimer’s on May 4. He was 84.

Bast wrote scripts for episodes of series including “Combat!,” “Perry Mason,” “Ben Casey,” “The Outer Limits,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Honey West,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Mod Squad” and “It Takes a Thief.” He also wrote scripts for the BBC and British Independent Television, adapted Jean Giradoux’s play “Tiger at the Gates” for Granada Television and wrote episodes for classic series “The Prisoner.”

In 1976 he received the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for his telepic “The Legend of Lizzie Borden,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery. His 1977 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Man in the Iron Mask,” with Richard Chamberlain in the dual role, was nominated for an Emmy, and in 1982 his script for “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” with Anthony Andrews and Ian McKellen,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Wilton Schiller, Writer, Producer for ‘Lassie,’ ‘The Fugitive,’ Dies at 95

Wilton Schiller, Writer, Producer for ‘Lassie,’ ‘The Fugitive,’ Dies at 95
Wilton Schiller, a writer and producer with a 50-year career that took him from the Golden Age of television to series such as “Lassie,” “Dragnet” and “The Fugitive” to “The Six Million Dollar Man,” died July 27 at home in Studio City, Calif. He was 95.

Schiller wrote hundreds of episodes of series such as the original “Superman” series, as well as “The Adventures of Superman,” “Leave It to Beaver,” “Dragnet,” “Have Gun Will Travel,” “Broken Arrow,” “Rawhide,” “Adam 12” and “M Squad.”

He wrote for “The Fugitive” and produced the last year of the series, with the final episode breaking all U.S. records for viewership. Recently the series was included in the top 101 television series of the last six decades by the Writers Guild of America.

Schiller also produced the series “Ben Casey” and “Mannix,” served as executive story consultant for “Six Million Dollar Man,” and co-wrote the two-part telepic “Captain America” with his wife,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87
Rosemary Murphy, who appeared as the neighbor Maudie Atkinson in the classic 1962 film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” starring Gregory Peck, died Saturday in New York City. She was 87 and had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.BzHqOdBQ.dpuf Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87
Rosemary Murphy, who appeared as the neighbor Maudie Atkinson in the classic 1962 film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” starring Gregory Peck, died Saturday in New York City. She was 87 and had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.BzHqOdBQ.dpuf Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bob Hastings, Lt. Carpenter on ‘McHale’s Navy,’ Dies at 89

Bob Hastings, Lt. Carpenter on ‘McHale’s Navy,’ Dies at 89
Bob Hastings, a character actor best known for his role on 1960s sitcom “McHale’s Navy” as Lt. Elroy Carpenter, the bumbling, sycophantic aide to Captain Binghampton, died June 30 in Burbank, Calif., of pancreatic cancer. He was 89.

Hastings also recurred on “All in the Family” as Tommy Kelsey, the owner of the bar that Archie frequents and later buys.

The actor worked in television from its very earliest years, with a role as Hal on the DuMont network’s “Captain Video and His Video Rangers” in 1949.

Hastings recurred on “The Phil Silvers Show” in various roles in the late 1950s and guested on “Gunsmoke,” “Ben Casey,” “Dennis the Menace” and “Twilight Zone.”

He was a series regular on “McHale’s Navy” from 1962-66 and appeared in the two features spun off from the series in 1964 and 1965.

Hastings got his start in radio as the voice of the title character in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Peggy O’Shea, Head Writer for ‘One Life to Live,’ Dies at 91

Peggy O’Shea, Head Writer for ‘One Life to Live,’ Dies at 91
Peggy (Margaret Mary) O’Shea, former head writer for daytime soaps “Capitol” and “One Life to Live” and for a time a writer on “Peyton Place,” died May 1 in Los Angeles of a stroke and its complications. She was 91.

O’Shea was head writer on ABC’s “One Life to Live” for much of the 1980s, sometimes in conjunction with Sam Hall. She was head writer on CBS’ “Capitol” during roughly the same period.

She worked on a range of other shows with her husband, TV writer Lou Shaw, penning episodes of “Dr. Kildare,” “Ben Casey” and “Have Gun Will Travel,” among others.

O’Shea is survived by Shaw, who created the show “Quincy, M.E.”
See full article at Variety - TV News »

R.I.P. Character Actor Larry D. Mann

The man whose 100-plus film and TV credits include voicing Yukon Cornelius in the holiday TV classic Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer and playing the train conductor in Best Picture Oscar winner The Sting died Monday in Los Angeles. Larry D. Mann was 91. The Toronto native got his start on Canadian TV and went on to appear on classic shows ranging from Howdy Doody to MacGyver. In between, his dozens of TV appearances included 77 Sunset Strip, The Big Valley, Ben Casey, My Favorite Martian, Get Smart, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Hogan’s Heroes, Bewitched, Green Acres, Gunsmoke, Quincy M.E., The Dukes Of Hazzard and recurring as a judge on Hill Street Blues. His big-screen credits include The Quick And The Dead, Robin And The 7 Hoods, The Singing Nun, In The Heat Of The Night and The Octogon.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Paul Mantee, Popular Character, Dead At Age 82; Starred In "Robinson Crusoe On Mars"

  • CinemaRetro
Paul Mantee, a popular fixture on TV shows and feature films, passed away on November 7. Mantee had appeared on many TV series over the years and had recurring roles on the 1980s hits Hunter and Cagney and Lacy. He first began appearing in the medium in the late 1959s and eventually guest starred on major programs such as The F.B.I, Mannix, Dragnet, Ben Casey, Dr. Kildare, Batman, The Time Tunnel, Bonanza, Kojak and Seinfeld. Mantee also appeared in small roles in many feature films. In 1964 he had a rare starring role in Robinson Crusoe on Mars, a fairly low-budget sci-fi film that became a major cult hit thanks to its intelligent script, direction and performances. He also had the lead role in the 1968 James Bond spoof A Man Called Dagger. For more click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Actress Kim Hamilton Dies at 81

Actress Kim Hamilton Dies at 81
Kim Hamilton, an African American actress who appeared onstage, in films and on television and was the wife of the late actor Werner Klemperer — Col. Klink on “Hogan’s Heroes” — at a time when mixed marriages were uncommon even in Hollywood, died of natural causes in Los Angeles on Sept. 16, four days after her 81st birthday.

Two of her early and most noted roles in a career that spanned more than six decades were as Brock Peter’s wife in “To Kill a Mockingbird” and as Harry Belafonte’s wife in “Odds Against Tomorrow.” She had most recently appeared in the 2010 film “The Beginners.”

She appeared in many other films, including “The Greatest Story Ever Told,” “Body & Soul,” “The Wild Angels” and the cult film “Leach Women.”

Her long career on television began with a role as Andy’s girlfriend on “Amos & Andy.” Other credits included “Ben Casey,” “Dr. Kildare,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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