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Everybody Loves Raymond: Doris Roberts Dies at 90; Farewell Marie Barone

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Actress Doris Roberts has died at the age of 90. An accomplished performer with a C.V. longer than your arm, Roberts assumed her best-known TV role as Marie Barone, on CBS's Everybody Loves Raymond TV series, from 1996 to 2005.

Born Doris May Green, November 4, 1925, in St. Louis, Missouri, the actress took her step-father's surname. Her earliest TV series roles, in the 1950s, were in properties such as Starlight Theatre, Studio One in Hollywood, Suspense, Look Up and Live, 'Way Out, Ben Casey, Naked City, The Defenders, and The Doctors and the Nurses.

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Doris Roberts Dies: ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Mom Was 90

TV, film and Broadway actress Doris Roberts, best known as Ray Romano’s (Raymond Barone) mother Marie on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, has died. Her son, Michael Cannata, says Roberts died in her sleep of natural causes Sunday night. She was 90. A St. Louis native, Roberts began her acting career in the early 1950s on TV’s Studio One, going on to appear in such series as The Naked City, Way Out, Ben Casey and The Defenders. She later segued to film in the 1960s and…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Doris Roberts Dies: ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Mom Was 90

Doris Roberts Dies: ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Mom Was 90
TV, film and Broadway actress Doris Roberts, best known as Ray Romano’s (Raymond Barone) mother Marie on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, has died. Her son, Michael Cannata, says Roberts died in her sleep of natural causes Sunday night. She was 90. A St. Louis native, Roberts began her acting career in the early 1950s on TV’s Studio One, going on to appear in such series as The Naked City, Way Out, Ben Casey and The Defenders. She later segued to film in the 1960s and…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Doris Roberts, ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Star, Dead at 90

  • The Wrap
Doris Roberts, ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Star, Dead at 90
Doris Roberts, who played Ray Barone’s prying mother on the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died Sunday, a representative for the actress told TheWrap on Monday. She was 90. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1925, Roberts began acting in 1952, appearing on the television series “Studio One.” Appearances on “The Naked City,” “Ben Casey” and “The Defenders” followed. She first appeared on the big screen in the 1961 film “Something Wild.” Roberts’ other film credits include “A Lovely Way to Die,” “No Way to Treat a Lady” and “The Honeymoon Killers.” On television, she also appeared on “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman,”...
See full article at The Wrap »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Willard

“I was good to you, Ben!” Well, that’s true, Willard, up to a point. Daniel Mann’s Willard (1971) makes a few good and satirical points, one being don’t bite the hand that feeds you, especially as that “hand” might bite you right back. Willard kicked off the 70’s Critters Done Wrong By (trademark pending) subgenre, leading to such memorable fodder as Frogs (1972), Food of the Gods (1976), and Day of the Animals (1977). However, Willard stands out from the (rat) pack by keeping it thrills low key and scurrying on the ground.

Produced by Bing Crosby Productions (yes, that Bing) and distributed by Cinerama Releasing Corporation (they also put out The Beast Must Die and Seizure), Willard received good notices, and more importantly to the genre, pulled in over $14 million Us when it was released in June of ’71. Propelled by top notch performances, Willard delivers the vermin to your doorstep.
See full article at DailyDead »

R.I.P. Character Actor Larry D. Mann

The man whose 100-plus film and TV credits include voicing Yukon Cornelius in the holiday TV classic Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer and playing the train conductor in Best Picture Oscar winner The Sting died Monday in Los Angeles. Larry D. Mann was 91. The Toronto native got his start on Canadian TV and went on to appear on classic shows ranging from Howdy Doody to MacGyver. In between, his dozens of TV appearances included 77 Sunset Strip, The Big Valley, Ben Casey, My Favorite Martian, Get Smart, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Hogan’s Heroes, Bewitched, Green Acres, Gunsmoke, Quincy M.E., The Dukes Of Hazzard and recurring as a judge on Hill Street Blues. His big-screen credits include The Quick And The Dead, Robin And The 7 Hoods, The Singing Nun, In The Heat Of The Night and The Octogon.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Paul Mantee, Popular Character, Dead At Age 82; Starred In "Robinson Crusoe On Mars"

  • CinemaRetro
Paul Mantee, a popular fixture on TV shows and feature films, passed away on November 7. Mantee had appeared on many TV series over the years and had recurring roles on the 1980s hits Hunter and Cagney and Lacy. He first began appearing in the medium in the late 1959s and eventually guest starred on major programs such as The F.B.I, Mannix, Dragnet, Ben Casey, Dr. Kildare, Batman, The Time Tunnel, Bonanza, Kojak and Seinfeld. Mantee also appeared in small roles in many feature films. In 1964 he had a rare starring role in Robinson Crusoe on Mars, a fairly low-budget sci-fi film that became a major cult hit thanks to its intelligent script, direction and performances. He also had the lead role in the 1968 James Bond spoof A Man Called Dagger. For more click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »

'Casting By': John Travolta, John Lithgow thank 'beloved' Lynn Stalmaster

John Travolta certainly knows the value of a having a casting director in his corner.

If not for the faith a legendary one named Lynn Stalmaster had in his talent, the enduring star might never have won the role of "Sweathog" Vinnie Barbarino in the sitcom "Welcome Back, Kotter" ... which set him on a course of fame that exploded soon afterward with the successes of such movies as "Saturday Night Fever" and "Grease." Travolta is among those paying tribute to "my beloved Lynn" (as he puts it) and others in the documentary "Casting By," which has its HBO debut Monday, Aug. 5.

"I wouldn't be here today if it weren't for Lynn and his so believing in me," Travolta recalls for Zap2it. "At age 18, I was up for the movie 'The Last Detail,' in the part Randy Quaid eventually played. Lynn was just hellbent to get me cast in that,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Jeanne Cooper and her quest for a Daytime Emmy

Jeanne Cooper and her quest for a Daytime Emmy
While you might think Susan Lucci had the hardest journey to Daytime Emmy victory, it took Jeanne Cooper 35 years and nine nominations before she won for playing Katharine Chancellor on "The Young and the Restless." The grande dame of daytime died on May 8 at age 84 after a long illness. Cooper began on "Y&R" shortly it premiered in 1973. While her character was an instant success, she was only nominated for the first time in 1989. By then, Katherine had been through alcoholism, a couple of husbands, several feuds with Jill Foster Abbot and even a facelift. That latter storyline was groundbreaking as the actress allowed footage of her own facelift to be used. Prior to even contending at the Daytime Emmys, Cooper had been nominated twice at the Primetime awards: she lost her1962 Supporting Actress nod for “Ben Casey” to Pamela Brown for “Hallmark Hall of Fame” and her 1987 Drama Guest
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Young And The Restless' Star Dies At 84

'Young And The Restless' Star Dies At 84
Jeanne Cooper, who played Katherine Chancellor on the daytime soap opera "The Young and the Restless," has died, TVLine reports. She was 84.

Cooper's son, actor Corbin Bernsen, confirmed the sad news on Twitter today (May 8), writing:

Mom passed this morning. She was in peace and without fear. U all have been incredible in your love. In her name share it 2 day with others.

Corbin Bernsen (@corbinbernsen) May 8, 2013

Cooper was hospitalized last month with an undisclosed ailment and was said to be in critical condition.

Bernsen also took to his Facebook page to announce the news of his mother's death, sharing, "My mother passed away this morning just a short time ago, peaceful with my sister by her side, in her sleep. I was going to visit this afternoon, thought I had time. Reminder to self - time is a precious thing. I too am at peace however. I said my
See full article at Huffington Post »

Murder, She Wrote: William Windom Dies; Farewell Dr. Seth Hazlitt

A very familiar face to television viewers, actor William Windom, has died from congestive heart failure at the age of 88. He passed away on August 16th at his home in Woodacre, California.

Windom was born in New York City in 1923 and was the great-grandson of the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury of the same name. He later served in the Army during World War II.

His first movie role was as Mister Gilmer, the prosecutor of Tom Robinson in 1962's To Kill a Mockingbird but he had been appearing on television for years before that.

Windom's TV work spanned six decades and it's hard to name a classic TV show that he didn't appear on at least once. They include roles on Ben Casey, The Donna Reed Show, The Lucy Show, Twilight Zone, 77 Sunset Strip, The Fugitive, Bonanza, That
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Christie Brinkley's father Don Brinkley, noted TV writer, dies at 91

  • Pop2it
Don Brinkley (not pictured), whose television writing credits include "Trapper John, M.D." (pictured), "The Untouchables," "Ben Casey," "Rawhide," "The Fugitive" and "The Man from U.N.C.L.E," has passed away at the age of 91 on Saturday (July 14) in Sag Harbor, New York.

In addition to his TV writing, Brinkley was also a journalist for CBS Radio News and was honored by the Museum of Broadcasting in 1988.

Brinkley is the stepfather of model and actress Christie Brinkley and her brother Greg. He adopted them when he married their mother Marge. He has two children, Jeff and Kim Brinkley, from his first marriage. Brinkley is also survived by six grandchildren, including Alexa Ray Joel, daughter of Christie Brinkley and Billy Joel.
See full article at Pop2it »

TV Writer Don Brinkley Dies At 91

TV Writer Don Brinkley Dies At 91
New York -- Don Brinkley, a noted television writer and the stepfather of supermodel and actress Christie Brinkley, has died. He was 91.

A spokeswoman for Brinkley said her stepfather died on Saturday in Sag Harbor, N.Y.

Don Brinkley was a television writer and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years.

His credits included "Trapper John, M.D.," and such 1950s and 1960s staples as "Wanted: Dead or Alive," "The Untouchables," "Ben Casey," "Rawhide," "The Fugitive," "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and "Medical Center."

In 1988, he was honored by the Museum of Broadcasting in New York.

He also was a journalist for CBS Radio News.

He is survived by his second wife, Marge, and two children – Christie, who was adopted by Don – and Greg. He had two children with his first wife Lois. His grandchildren include musician Alexa Ray Joel.
See full article at Huffington Post »

TV Writer Don Brinkley Dies At 91

TV Writer Don Brinkley Dies At 91
New York -- Don Brinkley, a noted television writer and the stepfather of supermodel and actress Christie Brinkley, has died. He was 91.

A spokeswoman for Brinkley said her stepfather died on Saturday in Sag Harbor, N.Y.

Don Brinkley was a television writer and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years.

His credits included "Trapper John, M.D.," and such 1950s and 1960s staples as "Wanted: Dead or Alive," "The Untouchables," "Ben Casey," "Rawhide," "The Fugitive," "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and "Medical Center."

In 1988, he was honored by the Museum of Broadcasting in New York.

He also was a journalist for CBS Radio News.

He is survived by his second wife, Marge, and two children – Christie, who was adopted by Don – and Greg. He had two children with his first wife Lois. His grandchildren include musician Alexa Ray Joel.
See full article at Aol TV. »

Davy Jones, Monkee and teenage heart-throb – a life in clips

Former Monkee Davy Jones, who has died of a heart attack aged 66, enjoyed a long career as a TV and radio star. Here are some clips to remember him by

Davy Jones always had a penchant for entertaining, but it was his mother's death from emphysema in 1960 that prompted him to drop out of school and become, of all things, a jockey.

Z Cars

Only 14 at the time, the diminutive Jones apprenticed under jockey Basil Foster, who was the first to recognize the boy's charm and talent. Foster encouraged Jones to pursue acting and before long he had landed parts on the British soap Coronation Street as well as BBC's Z Cars. He makes his appearance in this Z Cars clip at about the 50-second mark.

Oliver!

These appearances were followed by a big part in the London and American production of Oliver!, which itself was featured on The Ed Sullivan Show
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

New Release: It Takes a Thief: Complete Series DVD

Release Date: Oct. 25, 2011

Price: DVD $199.99

Studio: Entertainment One

Robert Wagner is Alexander Mundy in It Takes a Thief.

The arrival of the 1960s’ classic action-adventure television series It Takes a Thief: The Complete Series marks the show’s home entertainment debut.

Fusing the heist and espionage genres, the show aired on ABC-tv for two and a half seasons, beginning in January, 1968.

Inspired by Alfred Hitchcock’s 1955 film To Catch a Thief starring Cary Grant, It Takes a Thief stars Robert Wagner (TV’s Hart to Hart) as dashing Alexander Mundy, the world’s greatest cat burglar … until the day he got caught. As part of his pardon to stay out of prison, Mundy uses his wily skills in the world of espionage, helping to steal for the Sia, an American spy agency.

Technically under house arrest, Mundy travels the world over, performing daring acts of thievery in the name of the U.
See full article at Disc Dish »

Remember Me:  Cliff Robertson (1923-2011) – “Utility Player”

He played leads – but never became a star. He played supporting parts – but was never considered a second-stringer. He moved between the big and little screen easily throughout much of his career without ever looking like he’d overreached (for the former), or was slumming (in the latter). The only thing that mattered – the one thing that was consistent whatever the vehicle, whatever the medium, whatever the size of the role – was the caliber of his work. By his own description, Cliff Robertson, who passed away this week one day after his 88th birthday, was a “utility player” who shone whatever his position.

Still in his 20s, he was already working regularly on TV during those early, hectic days of live broadcasting in the early 1950s, and just as immediately demonstrating the utility that marked his career. His range was limitless as he performed in everything from heavyweight drama anthology
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Late Night Classics – Return to Horror High

Every fancy pants movie star has a skeleton in their closet that they don’t want to speak of. Whether it is Jason Alexander in The Burning, Tom Hanks in He Knows You’re Alone, or Demi Moore in Parasite – some of the biggest names in show business have started off their careers doing horror films. Perhaps the biggest of them all is ladies man George Clooney, who cut his teeth on the films Return of the Killer Tomatoes, and my spotlight movie of the day – Return to Horror High. Instead of talking to George, I got in touch with actress Lori Lethin to wax nostalgic about this overlooked slasher.

Jason Bene: After starring in Bloody Birthday and The Prey, were you happy to do another slasher film, especially one that was spoofing the genre?

Lori Lethin: I loved doing Return to Horror High. I thought it was so
See full article at Killer Films »

William Marshall: The black Christopher Lee

After his electrifying performance as Blacula (1972), the great William Marshall was briefly considered a worthy successor to Christopher Lee's vampire king. A respected Shakespearean actor with an impressive theatre background, he was set to become a major horror star of the seventies, but like his fellow stage actor Robert Quarry, who achieved the same status as Count Yorga, his film career faded rapidly after the genre went through a radical re-think following the commercial success of The Exorcist (1973).

Marshall remained in New York to train in as an actor and director in Grand Opera and Shakespeare, although he had to support himself in a variety of jobs before making his professional stage debut. At 6ft 5inches, he was an impressively built, handsome, strong-featured actor with a booming bass baritone voice to match his towering presence. Not surprisingly, he quickly built up a formidable reputation as America's finest Shakespearean actor,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

'Empire Strikes Back' director Irvin Kershner: An appreciation

'Empire Strikes Back' director Irvin Kershner: An appreciation
George Lucas will always be known as the genius behind Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Darth Vader. But it was Irvin Kershner, a professorial and genteel man of the old school, who directed the film most Star Wars aficionados consider the greatest chapter in the saga, 1980′s The Empire Strikes Back. It was to Kershner’s credit that he never jockeyed for the limelight or clawed for the credit. He was a quiet craftsman who believed in letting the images he put on screen speak for him. The news that Kershner passed away earlier today leaves a giant black hole
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »
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