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The Bad Sleep Well (1960)

Warui yatsu hodo yoku nemuru (original title)
Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, Thriller | 22 January 1963 (USA)
A vengeful young man marries the daughter of a corrupt industrialist in order to seek justice for his father's suicide.

Director:

Akira Kurosawa
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3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Toshirô Mifune ... Kôichi Nishi
Masayuki Mori ... Public Corporation Vice President Iwabuchi
Kyôko Kagawa ... Yoshiko Nishi
Tatsuya Mihashi ... Tatsuo Iwabuchi
Takashi Shimura ... Administrative Officer Moriyama
Kô Nishimura ... Contract Officer Shirai
Takeshi Katô ... Itakura
Kamatari Fujiwara ... Assistant-to-the-Chief Wada
Chishû Ryû ... Public Prosecutor Nonaka
Seiji Miyaguchi ... Prosecutor Okakura
Kôji Mitsui ... Reporter A
Ken Mitsuda Ken Mitsuda ... Public Corporation President Arimura
Nobuo Nakamura ... Legal Adviser
Susumu Fujita Susumu Fujita ... Detective
Kôji Nanbara ... Prosecutor Horiuchi
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Storyline

It is a high-profile wedding: the daughter of Mr Iwabuchi, a wealthy businessman, is marrying Mr Nishi, a car salesman. However, Mr Iwabuchi and other senior members of his company are suspected of corporate malfeasance and the wedding becomes a bit of a farce, with the press swarming all over it. To add to the discord, the company officials are rather publicly reminded of an ignominious event which occurred a few years ago - a senior employee committed suicide by jumping from the 7th floor of their offices. Now other senior officials are committing suicide and it looks like it is related to that death of a few years ago. Written by grantss

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In a 1996 interview, Masaru Sato stated that his musical score for the film was his own interpretation of a 'big, evil corporate world' through the phrase he had always heard relating to the corporate world; "It's a jungle out there," which inspired him to "create a jungle-like atmosphere in the music" for the film. See more »

Quotes

Koichi Nishi: It wasn't easy leaping into a snake pit like this.
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Alternate Versions

Originally released at 151 in Japan; USA version removes 16 minutes of footage. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Kurosawa: The Last Emperor (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden, Op. 388)
(uncredited)
Music by Johann Strauss
Played before and during the arrest
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User Reviews

Something's Rotten in the State of Japan
17 September 2002 | by gvb0907See all my reviews

Akira Kurosawa's "The Bad Sleep Well" is too dense and frankly too slow a film to qualify as a thriller in the usual sense. Although the elements are there - intrigue, double crosses, revenge, and crimes both naked and invisible - the pacing is too deliberate and there is little real suspense.

Yes, it's "Hamlet," though in a subtle, understated, Japanese way. Some of the characters are left out, but you'll eventually spot the Prince, Horatio, Ophelia, and Claudius. However, unlike his "Macbeth" ("Throne of Blood"), this is only a partial transposition and Kurosawa wisely does not carry the parallels too far.

Although it takes patience, the picture has its rewards. The performances are good, especially Masayuki Mori as the reptilian manipulator Iwabuchi, Kamatari Fujiwara as the hapless accountant Wada, and, as always, Takashi Shimura as master bureaucrat Moriyama. The sharp black-and-white cinematography gives the film a photo-journal aura of authenticity. And Masaru Sato's wonderful opening theme, heavy with menace and unease, certainly sets an appropriate tone.

Toshiro Mifune as Nishi/Hamlet is unusually restrained here, his normal fire largely internalized. He's adequate, but this casting against type doesn't really suit him.

"The Bad Sleep Well" is Kurosawa's attack on Japan's post-war business corruption that apparently was endemic by 1960 and perhaps still is today. His critique is harsh and unsparing, though one can't help but get the feeling that he's shooting at fish in a barrel.

Beyond the corruption of the corporate scandal, which the film literally headlines, is a strong sense of inner decay. Nearly everyone, regardless of their position, is uncomfortable. Even Iwabuchi, for all his power, must answer awkwardly to greater, unseen forces. Only the jackal-journalists who cover the opening wedding banquet seem immune to the pervasive uneasiness.

Yet all, save Nishi, are prepared to accept this state of affairs in return for their security. Ironically, Nishi himself seems most comfortable in an old air raid shelter in the ruins of a munitions plant, his own "castle", as it were, where he fights for honor as he understands it.

Recommended for Kurosawa fans and anyone interested in Japanese psyche, culture, or style. Those expecting a slam-bang 1940s Warner Brothers treatment will be extremely disappointed and probably won't last an hour.


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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

22 January 1963 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Bad Sleep Well See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$15,942, 28 July 2002

Gross USA:

$46,808

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$46,808
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Perspecta Stereo (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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