5.9/10
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3 user

Walk Tall (1960)

TV-PG | | Western | 1 September 1960 (USA)
In order to keep peace, an Army captain hunts a gang leader for raiding Indians.

Director:

Maury Dexter

Writer:

Joseph Fritz (story and screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Willard Parker ... Captain Ed Trask
Joyce Meadows Joyce Meadows ... Sally Medford
Kent Taylor ... Frank Carter
Russ Bender ... Col. Stanton
Ron Soble ... Leach
William Mims William Mims ... Jake (as Bill Mims)
Alberto Monte Alberto Monte ... Carlos
Felix Locher Felix Locher ... Chief Black Feather
Dave DePaul Dave DePaul ... Buffalo Horn
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Storyline

In order to keep peace, an Army captain hunts a gang leader for raiding Indians.

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Taglines:

They Gave the West a New Code to Live By!

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 September 1960 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

La maldición de un condenado See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Color by Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Willard Parker and Russ Bender would star in Maury Dexter's Air Patrol. Meanwhile, Bender worked in most of Maury Dexter's low-budget programmers. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Maury Dexter's Little Quiet Man
8 January 2019 | by TheFearmakersSee all my reviews

In Maury Dexter's b-Western, WALK TALL (not to be mistaken with the WALKING TALL series), the second scene... following a massacre of an Indian tribe with only women and children present... is nifty herd of Infantry men riding horses across a creek where a bevy of tents are spread at the foot of a gorgeous mountain landscape...

A minimalist version of a John Ford Western, not one directed by the man whose eclectic filmography includes bikini beach babes, marauding bikers and determined cops after sneaky robbers: And following the aforementioned exterior shot, the wonderful aesthetic does not sustain inside a tent where a one-color backdrop conveniently frames three men: The film's star, experienced Calvary veteran Willard Parker (who the Indians say "Walks Tall") flanked by Maury Dexter regular-everyman Russ Bender as Parker's affable superior, and, last but not least, a wise old Indian Chief dead set on finding the one man everyone knows killed the tribe that included an Indian warrior's young wife.

The mellow, contented pace of the lone Parker setting out on his mission... which will keep the Indians from waging war if the guilty party is captured and punished on time... heightens during the bridge of the first and second act as his character, Captain Ed Trask, finds and captures Kent Taylor as Frank Carter...

While the arrest was extremely simple - an oblivious Carter relaxing on the store steps of a ghost town where, once forced out of an idyllic malaise, he quickly hides the loot received for scalping the (what turns out being the wrong) Indians. From this point on, Trask's biggest obstacle is the most entertaining aspect of WALK TALL...

Taylor is the main actor (like Hitchcock's James Stewart/Preminger's Dana Andrews/Wood's Bela Lugosi) in Maury Dexter's early-60's troupe and, with a pencil-thin mustache no matter what side of the law he resides, here he's got the charm of a resilient snake, coolly playing down the "Gentleman Heavy" with sly humor and meticulous goading that intensifies once Joyce Meadows as Sally, whose family was attacked and slain by Indians a stone's throw from the duo's morning campout, gets easily brainwashed by the proud Indian Killer: after what she's been through, all Indians are better off dead...

And while the big and steady, TALL and sturdy Willard Parker - older than most Western-Action heroes who weren't young and energetic superstars to begin with - has to keep weathering Taylor's perpetual mind-games, what really fleshes out the otherwise cliché character is how he never gives an inch and always, literally, sticks to his guns...

In fact, both lead roles, the good and the bad, relies on pushing each other's buttons while the surrounding landscape makes you forget this is a vey low-budget venture with a good cast and a familiar "Cowboy Picture" script, rushing towards an inevitable and utterly predictable conclusion - ending way too soon since the trio's chemistry makes wordplay trump gunplay.

When being reunited with his dimwitted three-man gang to collect the loot, Kent Taylor's just another cerebral leader of vapid, one-dimensional brutes while our main man is back to the typical hero we started out with before the combined synergy provided more than we (or they) paid for. Thankfully, b-pictures usually have a short, to-the-point runtime, and for the sixty-one minutes, most of WALK TALL is a three-person show.


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