8.1/10
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54 user 68 critic

La Notte (1961)

La notte (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama | 19 February 1962 (USA)
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2:07 | Trailer
A day in the life of an unfaithful married couple and their steadily deteriorating relationship.

Writers:

Michelangelo Antonioni (story), Ennio Flaiano (story) | 4 more credits »
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6 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Marcello Mastroianni ... Giovanni Pontano
Jeanne Moreau ... Lidia Pontano
Monica Vitti ... Valentina Gherardini
Bernhard Wicki ... Tommaso Garani
Rosy Mazzacurati Rosy Mazzacurati ... Rosy
Maria Pia Luzi Maria Pia Luzi ... Nymphomaniac
Guido A. Marsan Guido A. Marsan ... Fanti (as Guido Ajmone Marsan)
Vittorio Bertolini Vittorio Bertolini
Vincenzo Corbella Vincenzo Corbella ... Mr. Gherardini
Ugo Fortunati Ugo Fortunati ... Cesarino
Gitt Magrini Gitt Magrini ... Signora Gherardini
Giorgio Negro Giorgio Negro ... Roberto
Roberta Speroni Roberta Speroni ... Beatrice
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Storyline

In Milan, after visiting dear friend Tommaso Garani that is terminal in a hospital, the writer Giovanni Pontano goes to a party for the release of his last book, and his wife Lidia Pontano visits the place where she lived many years ago. In the night, they go to a night-club, and later to a party in the mansion of the tycoon Mr. Gherardini. Along the night, Giovanni flirts with Valentina Gherardini, the daughter of the host, and then he receives a proposal to work for him in the area of communication and write the history of his company. Meanwhile, Lidia flirts with the playboy Roberto. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Many nights led to this night, nights of time, nights of fear, nights of love, nights of loneliness, nights of pursuit and conquest, nights without privacy, and this night - a night of truth. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of Lars von Trier's favorite films. See more »

Goofs

Boom visible in shadow form as Giovanni leaves Tomasso's hospital room and walks down the corridor at 16mins or so into the film. See more »

Quotes

Mr. Gherardini: Look who's here. Our patroness from Rome. Mr. Pontano, this is Marquise Gentili. She works with orphanages. Do you smoke?
Marquise Gentili: I will have one. Everyone smokes here in Milan.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in To Each His Own Cinema (2007) See more »

User Reviews

 
Not as engaging in it's detachted style as L'Avventura, worthwhile none-the-less
21 May 2006 | by Quinoa1984See all my reviews

La Notte is very content to be a film seemingly about the mundane in the bourgeois world of an Italian couple. But what makes it worthwhile is that the time that Antonioni gives for the scenes and actors to breathe- ironically enough considering their social and intimate repression- allows for some curious moments to slip through (some of his best directed). The married couple here of the great Marcello Mastroianni and face-of-a-thousand-words Jeanne Moreau are not necessarily un-happy but unsatisfied with how their lives are at this point. The husband is a very successful and admired author, and they are well off. But the question still arises, underneath as the subtext in many scenes, what's it all really worth? Two of the main set-pieces/sequences in the film revolve around Moreau walking around aimlessly through the city while her husband is at a signing party, and at a rich party at night with a spacious amount of room for the guests.

All of these little, seemingly mundane moments are not all that the film is made up of, and it is in this existential (if it is relatively speaking) crisis for this couple that what real life that's out there and real pains strike up here and there. I loved the moment where Mastroianni is confronted by a seemingly crazy girl at the hospital; is she really crazy, or just desperate for someone's affection or attention (she is later beat into submission by the nurses)? Or when Moreau sees a fight break out with some young men in the less well-off section of town, the hesitation and surprise suddenly throws the fighters off. The party itself- where-in the 'Night' of the title is revealed- has moments of dialog that strike up the symbolic points Antonioni is making. But unlike the director's previous film, the visual-side of the cinematography has its moments but not necessarily as extraordinary in its overall make-up. Yet the initial peaks of interest- both in the actors (particularly Moreau who is always a treasure) and in the final, contemplative act with Monica Vitti, endures with better results.

Maybe the least in the 'trilogy' that Antonioni made between 1960 and 1962, which still makes it more watchable than the usual art-house bores of late. There is almost TOO much room for pondering about these characters, which makes for what could be seen as 'dull', but it really isn't. Detached, maybe, but not hard to connect with if open enough, this is a very good film if not one of the director's best.


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Details

Country:

Italy | France

Language:

Italian | English | French

Release Date:

19 February 1962 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Night See more »

Filming Locations:

Milan, Lombardy, Italy See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,547, 18 September 2016

Gross USA:

$39,236

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$39,236
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono | Mono (Fono-Roma)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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