6.7/10
1,875
60 user 11 critic

The Last Voyage (1960)

Approved | | Action, Adventure, Drama | 19 February 1960 (USA)
After a boiler explosion aboard an aging ocean liner, a man struggles to free his injured wife from the wreckage of their cabin and ensure the safety of their four-year-old daughter as the ship begins to sink.

Director:

Andrew L. Stone

Writer:

Andrew L. Stone
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Robert Stack ... Cliff Henderson
Dorothy Malone ... Laurie Henderson
George Sanders ... Captain Robert Adams
Edmond O'Brien ... Second Engineer Walsh
Woody Strode ... Hank Lawson
Jack Kruschen ... Chief Engineer Pringle
Joel Marston ... Third Officer Ragland
George Furness George Furness ... Third Officer Osborne
Richard Norris Richard Norris ... 3rd Engineer Cole
Marshall Kent ... Quartermaster
Andrew Hughes Andrew Hughes ... Radio Operator
Robert Martin Robert Martin ... 2nd Mate Mace
Bill Wilson Bill Wilson ... Youth
Tammy Marihugh ... Jill Henderson
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Storyline

Cliff Henderson and his family are traveling aboard the SS Claridon en route to Japan. The Claridon is an old ship, on its last voyage before heading to the scrap heap. An explosion in the engine room weakens the hull and the ship is now taking on more water than the bilge pumps can deal with. The Captain seems to have difficulty accepting that his ship will sink. Henderson's wife Laurie is severely injured and trapped under a fallen beam. While the men in the engine room work frantically to shore up the hull, Henderson tries to free his wife from the wreckage with the help of one of the crew, Hank Lawson. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

91 MINUTES OF THE MOST INTENSE SUSPENSE IN MOTION PICTURE HISTORY (original print ad - all caps) See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film features three actors who won Academy Awards for supporting roles: George Sanders for All About Eve (1950), Edmond O'Brien for The Barefoot Contessa (1954), and Dorothy Malone for Written on the Wind (1956). See more »

Goofs

As the three men rescue Laurie and they escape the doomed ship, there is no sign of all the floors rocking or being askew. Any ship that's waterlogged in the open sea would have floors and walls tilted and it would be shaking under the impact of the water flow, even in fair weather. See more »

Quotes

Second Engineer Walsh: Let's get while the getting's good!
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Connections

Features News of the Day (1952) See more »

Soundtracks

March: News of the Day
(uncredited)
Music by John Rochetti
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User Reviews

 
Murphy Rides With The S.S. Claridon
12 June 2010 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

Andrew and Virginia Stone, the husband and wife creative team who conceived and made the film The Last Voyage had the good fortune to use a real ocean liner in their film. No miniatures for their special effects which got The Last Voyage its only recognition from the Academy.

That harbinger of bad luck named Murphy must have been on the passenger roster of the S.S. Claridon which was captained by George Sanders because the law he espoused was operating full tilt on this trans-Pacific voyage. It all starts with fire in the boiler room which leads to a series of bad luck and bad decisions.

The story of the doomed ship Claridon proceeds on a double track. There is the story of the ship sinking itself and particularly the clash with Captain Sanders and Engineer Edmond O'Brien. The second is the personal story of Robert Stack who with wife Dorothy Malone and their little girl Tammy Marihugh are traveling to Tokyo for Stack's job. When an explosion occurs both Malone and the little girl are trapped in the cabin. With all that's going on around Stack finds precious little help for his family's personal plight.

The Last Voyage is a tightly paced drama which does not waste a second of film frame in the telling of its story. Best in the film I think is Malone who is just brilliant as the woman coming to grips with an impending doom. Honorable mention should also go to Woody Strode who plays a ship's stoker who renders needed assistance to Stack in his hour of trial.

The Last Voyage was nominated for Best Special Effects, but lost to the only other film nominated that year, George Pal's The Time Machine. I'd hated to have been an Academy voter that year and have to make that choice.

Five years earlier the Andrea Doria disaster had happened only minutes from New York harbor. The stories from that sea disaster were fresh in the public mind, let alone the story of the Titanic.

Fifty years after it was released The Last Voyage holds up well and even the technology changes haven't dated this film one bit. This one is highly recommended.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 February 1960 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Last Voyage See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,370,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Ryder Sound Services)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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