Elmer Gantry (1960) - News Poster

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Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?
The Shape of Water” is one of two Best Picture Oscar nominees with three acting nominations — the other being “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — but star Sally Hawkins and supporting players Octavia Spencer and Richard Jenkins are not predicted to win any of them. If they indeed go 0-3 on Sunday and “The Shape of Water” takes the top prize, the fantasy drama will join eight other Best Picture champs that did not convert any of its three-plus acting nominations into wins.

“Birdman” (2014) was the most recent Best Picture winner not to carry an acting award from at least three nominations, as Michael Keaton, Emma Stone and Edward Norton fell to Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”), Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”) and J.K. Simmons (“Whiplash”), respectively. Arquette and Simmons were the supporting frontrunners all season, but Keaton was locked in a tight Best Actor race with Redmayne until the SAG Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

The 21 Most Overlooked Directors in Oscar History, From Ingmar Bergman to Alexander Payne

  • Indiewire
It’s not easy to land a Best Director Oscar nomination — even for a white man. Of the hundreds of filmmakers recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in nine decades, just 10 have been African American or women — which is why 2018 nominees Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig are so rare. Not one black Best Director has won since John Singleton became the first nominee with “Boyz in the Hood” in 1991. Kathryn Bigelow is the only woman to ever take home a gold statue, for 2009’s “The Hurt Locker.” The only Asian director asked to accept top honors is Ang Lee, who prevailed for both “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi.”

Many great filmmakers have been nominated for their work outside of directing, including Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Sam Peckinpah, and Rob Reiner, but have never been invited to the Best Director party at all. Still more picked
See full article at Indiewire »

Telluride: ‘Wonderstruck’ Lenser Ed Lachman Reflects on His Career

Telluride: ‘Wonderstruck’ Lenser Ed Lachman Reflects on His Career
The Telluride Film Festival has held tributes for but a handful cinematographers over the last 44 years. The names are titans of the form: Karl Struss (“Sunrise,” “The Great Dictator”), Sven Nykvist (“Cries & Whispers,” “Fanny and Alexander”), John Alton (“An American in Paris,” “Elmer Gantry”), Vittorio Storaro (“Apocalypse Now,” “The Last Emperor”). This year, on the heels of a lifetime achievement prize from the American Society of Cinematographers earlier this year, Ed Lachman joins their ranks.

Oscar-nominated for “Far From Heaven” and “Carol,” Lachman is a frequent collaborator of director Todd Haynes. This year’s celebration of his work is pegged to their latest, “Wonderstruck,” which is part of the festival’s main program. But Lachman’s career outstretches those three movies alone, from working with icons of pop (Madonna) and humanitarianism (Mother Teresa), to collaborations with artists at the beginning (Sofia Coppola) and end (Robert Altman) of their careers.

Lachman spoke to Variety about his career to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals
(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

More Gay Stars and Directors and Screenwriters on TCM: From psychos and psychiatrists to surfers and stage mamas

On the day a U.S. appeals court lifted an injunction that blocked a Mississippi “religious freedom” law – i.e., giving Christian extremists the right to discriminate against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, etc. – not to mention the publication of a Republican-backed health care bill targeting the poor, the sick, the elderly, and those with “pre-existing conditions” – which would include HIV-infected people, a large chunk of whom are gay and bisexual men, so the wealthy in the U.S. can get a massive tax cut, Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride or Lgbt Month celebration continues (into tomorrow morning, Thursday & Friday, June 22–23) with the presentation of movies by or featuring an eclectic – though seemingly all male – group: Montgomery Clift, Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, Dirk Bogarde, John Schlesinger, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Arthur Laurents, and Jerome Robbins. After all, one assumes that, rumors or no, the presence of Mercedes McCambridge in one
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

"In Cold Blood" 50th Anniversary Screening, L.A. March 22

  • CinemaRetro
Laemmle’s Royal Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 50th anniversary screening of Richard Brook’s 1967 film In Cold Blood, based upon the novel of the same name by Truman Capote. The 134-minute film, which stars John Forsythe, Robert Blake and Scott Wilson, will be screened on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

Please Note: At press time, Actor Scott Wilson is scheduled to appear in person for a discussion about the film following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

In Cold Blood (1967)

50th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, March 22, at 7 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Followed by a Q & A with Actor Scott Wilson

In Cold Blood, the film version of Truman Capote’s immensely popular true crime novel, was nominated for four top Oscars in 1967. Richard Brooks received two nominations, for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

David Cassidy’s Nephew Auditions on The Voice — See Whose Team He Picks!

David Cassidy’s Nephew Auditions on The Voice — See Whose Team He Picks!
Music runs in the family!

David Cassidy‘s nephew Jack wowed viewers and fans with his blind audition on Monday’s The Voice, and successfully moved on to the battle rounds.

While playing the keys, the 18-year-old — who is also the grandson of Partridge Family‘s Shirley Jones — belted out Joan Osborne’s 1995 hit “One of Us” to sway coaches Adam Levine and Alicia Keys to turn their red chairs.

During the show, Jack, who grew up listening to Elton John and the Beatles, revealed that one of the reasons he liked the idea of a blind audition was because
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Founder – Review

Here’s a most unusual entry in a genre that’s now becoming a cinema staple: the origin story. Now that term may be most associated with comic books, and many of the superhero blockbusters are just that, the story of how he, she, or they came to get their powers, whip up a costume, and so on (the recent Doctor Strange is an excellent example). Ah, but this is a true tale, almost an autobiography. There have been many “bio-origins”, from Young Mr. Lincoln to Southside With You (hmm.. both about future presidents). Yes, there’s the individual’s journey, but this flick is also about a product. The Social Network concerned Mark Zuckerberg and the creation of that website, and Steve Jobs was as much about the man as it was about the personal computer. This new movie focuses on Ray Kroc and chronicles the evolution of the fast food restaurant industry,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Faith, Hope, & Clarity: Hollywood Again Shows Respect in Films for Spiritual Ideas

Faith, Hope, & Clarity: Hollywood Again Shows Respect in Films for Spiritual Ideas
Like a prodigal son, Hollywood is again returning to religion.

Since the 1980s, Hollywood has been criticized (with justification) for depicting any religious believer as mindless, evil or both. Filmmakers this year treat them with respect.

Silence” and “Hacksaw Ridge” daringly center around devout Christians. Religious beliefs have a positive effect on the lead characters in other 2016 films, including “Fences,” “Hidden Figures,” “Jackie,” “Mr. Church,” even “The Conjuring 2.”

Studios have their own belief system, and it’s based on recent hits. Hollywood loves stories about an individual whose principles are challenged, but usually the protagonist is a superhero, cop or animated creature.

Silence” depicts the culture clash of Western Christians with Japanese. The long legacy of the “white savior” is turned upside down, and the film raises issues of faith, doubt, personal integrity, and the fine line between belief and stubborn pride. To its credit, “Silence” raises questions that audience members must answer.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Piper Laurie: The Hollywood Interview

Piper Laurie Keeps Her Chin Up

By Alex Simon

Few living actors can claim to have experienced the Hollywood machine in all its iterations more than three-time Oscar nominee Piper Laurie. Signed by Universal Pictures at 17, their youngest contract player in years, she was in the last generation that were part of the Hollywood “factory,” pushed into “cheesecake” roles that accented physical attributes, as opposed to talent. It was the beginning of a journey.

She was born Rosetta Jacobs in Detroit, Michigan, on January 22, 1932, to immigrant parents of Polish and Russian Jewish descent. When she was still five, the family sent her and her sister to a children’s sanatorium in the mountains to see if her sister’s asthma could be cured. Three years later after being reunited with her family she decided she wanted to become an actress and studied with Benno and Betomi Schneider for several years
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Henry & Eleanor, Frank & Bram, and The Breakfast Club

On this day in movie related history... 

1152 King Henry II marries Eleanor of Aquitaine. Their romance is later fictionalized in the ever popular play/movie The Lion in Winter which we've written about several times

1897 Frank Capra is born in Italy. He'll immigrate to the Us at five years old and become one of the most famous film directors of all time.  Across the ocean in London a public reading of Bram Stoker's new novel "Dracula, or, The Un-dead" is staged. Frank Capra never makes a movie influenced by Dracula but everyone else does.

Meredith Wilson writing music1902 There's trouble right here in River City Mason City when Meredith Wilson is born. He'll later write The Music Man but not before accruing Oscar nominations for film scoring (The Little Foxes, The Great Dictator)

1912 The first Indian film Shree Pundalik is released in Mumbai. Thousands upon thousands upon thousands of
See full article at FilmExperience »

Review: ‘Billions’ Finale Justifies Investment in Showtime Drama (Spoilers)

Review: ‘Billions’ Finale Justifies Investment in Showtime Drama (Spoilers)
Sharply written and tailor-made to its two marquee stars, “Billions” deals with plenty of weighty issues but proved most enjoyable for an attribute that a lot of premium-cable dramas can tend to forget: Fun. And that set up a finale that made a number of hairpin turns, before rather niftily laying the foundation for a second season.

In its closing moments (and Spoiler Alert if you haven’t watched), in which a U.S. attorney, Chuck Rhoades (Paul Giamatti), confronted hedge-fund billionaire and season-long quarry Bobby Axelrod (Damian Lewis), the program actually brought to mind the movie “Duplicity,” which also co-starred Giamatti. Granted, in that corporate-espionage tale it was two titans of industry duking it out, but in each case the show involves powerful men, using every resource at their disposal in an effort to gain advantage over the other.

The last couple of hours also took perhaps the show’s most improbable,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Happy Ending

Jean Simmons is the original frustrated Mad Housewife who runs away from a 'dream marriage' in search of something more fulfilling. Uncompromising, adult, and making use of an interesting cast. Plus, the soundtrack uses Michel Legrand's incomparable song "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" The Happy Ending Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 112 min. / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Jean Simmons, John Forsythe, Shirley Jones, Teresa Wright, Nanette Fabray, Bobby Darin, Kathy Fields, Tina Louise, Dick Shawn, Lloyd Bridges, Karen Steele, Erin Moran. Cinematography Conrad Hall Original Music Michel Legrand, lyrics Alan & Marilyn Bergman Produced, Written and Directed by Richard Brooks

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I looked at some of the poster artwork for The Happy Ending, and yes indeed, one of the main styles is indeed like the cover of this disc -- a photo of a rusty garbage
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blast from the Past: Cotillard Naked and Dead in Hitchcock Photo-Homage

Marion Cotillard 'Psycho' scream. Marion Cotillard in 'Psycho' A few years ago – more exactly, in Feb./March 2008 – Vanity Fair published a series of images honoring Alfred Hitchcock movies made in Hollywood. (His British oeuvre was completely ignored.) The images weren't from the movies themselves; instead, they were somewhat faithful recreations featuring early 21st century stars, including several of that year's Oscar nominees. And that's why you get to see above – and further below – Marion Cotillard recreating the iconic Psycho shower scene. Cotillard took home the Best Actress Oscar at the 2008 ceremony for her performance as Edith Piaf in Olivier Dahan's La Vie en Rose / La môme. Janet Leigh, the original star of Hitchcock's Psycho, was shortlisted for the 1960 Best Supporting Actress Oscar, but lost to another good-girl-gone-bad, Shirley Jones as a sex worker in Richard Brooks' Elmer Gantry. More nudity, less horror Looking at the Marion Cotillard Psycho images,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Don Verdean | Review

Going Clear: Hess’ Uncomfortable Religious Comedy Defuses Subversive Potential

Religion and comedy don’t make for comfortable bedfellows, at least not for films attempting to play it safe by simultaneously poking fun at blind belief while expecting us to empathize with an inability to question basic tenets of any particular religious belief system. This is exactly the tone director Jared Hess strikes with his new comedy Don Verdean, a film about a well-meaning religious charlatan preying on the superstitious beliefs of Christians devoted to finding archaeological relics supposedly proving various mythological instances from the Bible. Rather than castigate his characters, we’re meant to laugh at their desperate antics in a sort of moral fable whose agenda is made palatable by its notable cast members allowing for a work around from falling into a religious niche market.

A decade ago, biblical archaeologist Don Verdean (Sam Rockwell) discovered an artifact in
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Secretly Scary: 1960’s Elmer Gantry

Lee Gambin’s “Secretly Scary” column continues to look at non-horror films that are secretly horror films! “And he rammed the fear of God into me so fast, I never heard my old man’s footsteps”– Lulu Baines (Shirley Jones) Based on Sinclair Lewis’s acclaimed novel about rampant rabid hypocrisy in religion and the despicable corruption of…

The post Secretly Scary: 1960’s Elmer Gantry appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Review: Richard Brooks' "In Cold Blood" (1967); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“A Study Of Darkness

By Raymond Benson

One of the more controversial motion pictures to emerge out of what film historians call “New Hollywood” was In Cold Blood, which was released to theaters “for mature audiences only.” The New Hollywood movement began around 1966, when the Production Code finally started to collapse (and before the movie ratings were instituted) and studios commenced allowing auteur filmmakers to do whatever the hell they wanted. The year 1967 was especially a groundbreaking one with the release of such “adult” fare as Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate, In the Heat of the Night, and In Cold Blood.

In Cold Blood is based on the “non-fiction novel” by Truman Capote about the true crime of 1959 in which an innocent family of four in Kansas were murdered by two ex-cons who believed there was $10,000 hidden in a safe in the house (there wasn’t). Capote spent several years writing the book,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Day of the Dead List: Top 10 Most Piercingly Horrific Movie Screams

Top Ten Scream Queens: Barbara Steele, who both emitted screams and made others do same, is in a category of her own. Top Ten Scream Queens Halloween is over until next year, but the equally bewitching Day of the Dead is just around the corner. So, dead or alive, here's my revised and expanded list of cinema's Top Ten Scream Queens. This highly personal compilation is based on how memorable – as opposed to how loud or how frequent – were the screams. That's the key reason you won't find listed below actresses featured in gory slasher films. After all, the screams – and just about everything else in such movies – are as meaningless as their plots. You also won't find any screaming guys (i.e., Scream Kings) on the list below even though I've got absolutely nothing against guys who scream in horror, whether in movies or in life. There are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

No Thoughts Of Love: The Professionals – 1966

“This 1966 western… has the expertise of a cold old whore with practiced hands and no thoughts of love. There’s something to be said for this kind of professionalism; the moviemakers know their business and they work us over. We’re not always in the mood for love or for art, and this movie makes no demands, raises no questions, doesn’t confuse the emotions. Even the absence of visual beauty or of beauty of language or concept can be something of a relief. The buyer gets exactly what he expects and wants and pays for: manipulation for excitement. We use the movie and the movie uses us.”

- Pauline Kael on The Professionals, from her collection Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

I’m not speaking from direct experience here, you understand, but I would imagine that old whores, cold or otherwise, could be pretty entertaining, not only in their professional
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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