A series of stories following a week in the life of a philandering tabloid journalist living in Rome.

Director:

Federico Fellini

Writers:

Federico Fellini (story), Ennio Flaiano (story) | 5 more credits »
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Popularity
3,326 ( 91)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 10 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marcello Mastroianni ... Marcello Rubini
Anita Ekberg ... Sylvia
Anouk Aimée ... Maddalena (as Anouk Aimee)
Yvonne Furneaux ... Emma
Magali Noël ... Fanny (as Magali Noel)
Alain Cuny ... Steiner
Annibale Ninchi ... Il padre di Marcello
Walter Santesso ... Paparazzo
Valeria Ciangottini Valeria Ciangottini ... Paola
Riccardo Garrone ... Riccardo
Evelyn Stewart ... Debuttante dell'anno (as Ida Galli)
Audrey McDonald Audrey McDonald ... Jane
Polidor ... Pagliaccio
Alain Dijon Alain Dijon ... Frankie Stout
Mino Doro ... Amante di Nadia
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Storyline

Rome, 1959/60. Marcello Rubini (played by Marcello Mastroianni) is a writer and journalist, the worst kind of journalist - a tabloid journalist, or paparazzo. His job involves him trying to catch celebrities in compromising or embarrassing situations. He tends to get quite close to his subject, especially when they're beautiful women. Two such subjects are a local heiress, Maddalena (Anouk Aimee), and a Swedish superstar-actress, Sylvia (Anita Ekberg), both of whom he has affairs with. This is despite being engaged to Emma (Yvonne Furneaux), a rather clingy, insecure, nagging, melodramatic woman. Despite his extravagant, pleasure-filled lifestyle, he is wondering if maybe a simpler life wouldn't be better. Written by grantss

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Roman Scandals - Bound to shock with its truth! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Federico Fellini wanted Françoise Fabian for the role of Maddalena, even visiting her at home, but she turned it down due to family commitments. See more »

Goofs

When Marcello and Madalena come out of the prostitute's apartment their car is already running (you can see exhaust at the back) before they get in. See more »

Quotes

Travestito: By 1965 there'll be total depravity. How squalid everything will be.
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Alternate Versions

In the original American release, distributed by American International Pictures, the titles open with the AIP logo and appear over a shot of the sky with clouds. In the current release on DVD - and as shown on TCM - the title sequence is over a black background. When originally released, censors in several countries trimmed certain scenes, including the orgy near the end of the film. See more »

Connections

Featured in TCM Guest Programmer: Isaac Mizrahi (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

La Dolce Vita de La Pietà
Written by Nino Rota
Conducted by Carlo Savina
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User Reviews

 
Bitterness Of The Sweet Life
9 May 2005 | by gftbiloxiSee all my reviews

LA DOLCE VITA presents a series of incidents in the life of Roman tabloid reporter Marcello Rubini (Marcello Mastroianni)--and although each incident is very different in content they create a portrait of an intelligent but superficial man who is gradually consumed by "the sweet life" of wealth, celebrity, and self-indulgence he reports on and which he has come to crave.

Although the film seems to be making a negative statement about self-indulgence that leads to self-loathing, Fellini also gives the viewer plenty of room to act as interpreter, and he cleverly plays one theme against its antithesis throughout the film. (The suffocation of monogamy vs. the meaninglessness of promiscuity and sincere religious belief vs. manipulative hypocrisy are but two of the most obvious juxtapositions.) But Fellini's most remarkable effect here is his ability to keep us interested in the largely unsympathetic characters LA DOLCE VITA presents: a few are naive to the point of stupidity; most are vapid; the majority (including the leads) are unspeakably shallow--and yet they still hold our interest over the course of this three hour film.

The cast is superior, with Marcello Mastroianni's personal charm particularly powerful. As usual with Fellini, there is a lot to look at on the screen: although he hasn't dropped into the wild surrealism for which he was sometimes known, there are quite a few surrealistic flourishes and visual ironies aplenty--the latter most often supplied by the hordes of photographers that scuttle after the leading characters much like cockroaches in search of crumbs. For many years available to the home market in pan-and-scan only, the film is now in a letterbox release that makes it all the more effective. Strongly recommended.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

Italy | France

Language:

Italian | English | French | German

Release Date:

19 April 1961 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

La Dolce Vita See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$198,220
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (premiere) | (re-release) | (premiere)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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