Invasion of the Animal People (1959) Poster

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So bad that it's really fun. Swedish version at least.
marimon6 September 2003
One thing to know about this movie is that it was made in two different versions. One Swedish and one American. Most of the ones who have commented this film has obviously seen the American edition that was edited and added with extra scenes.

From what I've read here and heard from others, the Swedish version is much better, still a really bad movie though, and it's a shame that only the American version has made it to the video market.From what I know the Swedish version only exists in one, maybe two, 35mm copies in Sweden and they are frozen for conservation.

I've seen it a couple of times and I cant help laughing. We used to show it here in Kiruna every year at our film festival, Arctic Light Film Festival, but had to stop because it was to expensive to thaw the film.
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Sweden's contribution to the cheesy horror movies of the 50's
Eboreg11 August 1998
Actually it's a Swedish-American collaboration. A spaceship (that looks VERY much like a meteor) crashes in Northern Sweden before the eyes of some Samis. Some people, including the young geologist Erik Engström and the American Dr Wilson, travel up to a village in the vicinity to take a look at the ship - and Dr Wilsons beautiful niece Diane. At about the same time the aliens (who never speak, but sound kinda like synthesizers) release their pet - a hilarious, 3 metre high, furry monster with ridiculous teeth (you've got to see it for yourself). I guess you get the picture. Without spoiling any of the fun I can say that the rest of the story involves wrecking of Sami villages, a totally uncalled-for nude scene (well, almost) , and a love affair (WHO could it be between?). This is a 50's monster turkey with real class, it has all the cliches and very few dull moments. If you watch it until the end, you get to see a visual effect that is BY FAR the worst one I've ever seen.
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4/10
Sweden's version of a 50s, Sci/Fi, B monster movie.
ChuckStraub8 August 2005
On the DVD I rented there were two versions of the same movie, Horror in the Midnight Sun, and Invasion of the Animal People. Although these are quite different, IMDb has these listed together as Rymdinvasion i Lappland. Horror in the Midnight Sun was a fairly decent movie. It's another low budget B movie from the late 50s. A lot of these have their problems and Horror in the Midnight Sun is no exception but it is an entertaining movie. It was also interesting to watch a movie of this genre that is Swedish/American made. It's a Swedish version of a B Sci/Fi monster movie. I'm glad I watched it. It was nothing special but still decent. Invasion of the Animal People was not as good and by itself would be a mess. When seen after watching Horror in the Midnight Sun, it does show how a movie can be cut up, pieces spliced in and the movie changed. Watching to see what and how the film was changed was the only thing I found interesting with Invasion of the Animal People. If you're really into 50s Sci/Fi B monster movies, you should take a look at Horror In The Midnight Sun but if you only have a chance to see Invasion of the Animal People, don't bother.
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10/10
Schlock oddity from Scandinavia
darius_m_klein23 August 2008
This hauntingly atmospheric monster flick was one of my favorite creature features on Saturday afternoon TV when I was kid. It was known as "Invasion of the Animal People" (a great title, in my opinion - sleazemeister distributor Jerry Warren deserves credit). The talky and inane tacked-on beginning, while unnecessary, doesn't take up enough time to detract from the film's crude, grainy, and ultimately mesmerizing beauty. A UFO lands in the snows of Lappland, and its bald, telepathic (?) occupants accidentally unleash their twenty-foot tall hairy humanoid pet. The latter then terrorizes the local Sami as well as Swedish cross-country skiers. The on-location Arctic locales give the film a look and feel which is unique in drive-in horror history.
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7/10
Pretty good Swedish SF movie destroyed by Jerry Warren
preppy-318 September 2004
This was a 1959 Swedish/American co-production. In the Lappland of Sweden a meteor crashes. Turns out it's not a meteor--it's a spaceship from another world. For no given reason--a huge, hairy monster comes from the spaceship, walks around, causes destruction and kidnaps a woman who has come with a team of scientists to explore the "meteor". Can anything stop this monster?

And what does it want?

There are lots of things wrong with this film--it has a romantic title song (for a SF feature!!!!); it opens with hysterically lousy special effects showing the spaceship landing; the monster doesn't show up until 50 minutes in (the film is only 70 minutes long); endless skiing footage; lousy acting (particularly Babara Wilson); laughable lapses in logic (note how conveniently Wilson's busted ankle is ignored). Also there's a pointless and fairly explicit nude shower scene which has no bearing whatsoever with the story! Still, it has an intelligent script; it's well-directed; takes place in a most unusual setting; has a very scary-looking monster and moves pretty quick. No classic but interesting.

It came to American in 1962. For some reason producer Jerry Warren destroyed it. He changed the title to "Invasion of the Animal People" (?????) and added John Carradine to the cast (probably for marquee value). Carradine opens up the film with the most insipid speech I've ever heard (it makes next to no sense) and narrates portions of it. Warren added dreadful new footage (badly shot and acted) which added nothing to the story; gave it a really silly new opening (involving Wilson); says it takes place in Switzerland (????); rearranged footage and cut out huge chunks. What is left is a hysterically bad, incomprehensible mess! I believe Carradine later said this was one of his worst movies (he's not kidding). It's known as being a camp classic.

But now BOTH versions are available on DVD. It's more than a little interesting to see how Warren totally destroyed a fairly good movie. It's a good thing the original is now available for people to view. "Invasion" gets a 1 (I wish I could give it a zero) but "Terror" gets a 7. Like I said, no classic but pretty well-done...and how many monster movies do you know that were made in Sweden?
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10/10
Strange...
stepphan14 September 2006
Can't actually rate this movie, it's so bad that it's good. It's either one or ten. The Swedish actors are talking really bad English, you can't believe it. For example "Who are you?", meaning "How are you." Microphones are visible sometimes. And at the "Royal Academy of Science", it's a handwritten paper sign pinned to the door. Very funny. In one scene, the hero leaves the heroin and is skiing downhill for a couple of minutes. Then the monster arrives at the girls place. She screams, and the hero hears it. Turn around and continue skiing downhill back to were he left her! And yes, "Lapplanders" live in Sweden, but they name themselves "Saami", "Lapplanders" are the inhabitants if the Swedish county "Lappland". And yes Saami hang around in funny hats, but not all the time.
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Very entertaining, especially if you're Swedish!
DennisAlexis5 May 2010
I'm from Sweden, and they don't make many horror/sci-fi movies here, so it's really nice to finally have this classic on DVD!

Sure, it's really cheap and a bit slow sometimes, but it's still entertaining, especially if you're Swedish and recognize some of the famous guest stars.

I have to say that I also like the monster design, it's quite unique, and the whole mountain setting gives the movie a great atmosphere.

The acting is quite good too. I especially enjoyed the beautiful Barbara Wilson. Swedish actor Gösta Prüzelius also appears in the movie. He is best known for his role as Reidar in 1990's soap opera "Rederiet".

By the way, famous Swedish singer Brita Borg, the girl singing in one of the scenes, passed away last night. She was eighty-three years old.
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6/10
Low Budget creature feature from Sweden
chris_gaskin12312 August 2008
Warning: Spoilers
I recently obtained a copy (part of the excellent Sci-Fi Gold series) of Invasion Of The Animal People off E-Bay and found it OK if a little slow moving in parts.

A spacecraft crashes in a remote area of Sweden and the Army and a geologist are sent to investigate this. They discover dead Reindear and then a huge hairy Yeti type monster on the loose which has come from the spacecraft. It kills some people and more animals and, as often in these movies, the monster kidnaps a girl.

You don't actually get to see the monster until later in the movie and then it is mostly in the shadows.

The copy I have is the American version directed by Jerry Warren and starring John Carradine.

Although far from the best 1950's monster movie, Invasion Of the Animal People was fairly enjoyable if a little slow moving at times. To sum up, fairly average.

Rating: 2 and a half stars out of 5.
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5/10
Wow, didn't know we could make this kind of movies in Sweden
Enchorde13 September 2005
Warning: Spoilers
** HERE BE SPOILERS **

Recap: An apparent meteor lands in the snow cowered wilderness in northern Sweden. Strangely enough it seems like it did a horizontal landing instead of a vertical strike with crater and all. A team of scientists are flown in from Stockholm and travels out to the site. There it is apparent that it is no meteor but an alien spacecraft. At the same time there are reports of a huge monster running about.

Comment: This is a typical B-movie scifi horror kind of thing that were not uncommon in the fifties. What I didn't know that there was one produced and filmed in Sweden. Unfortunately the story could have been better, it contains far to little action, far too little events. The ending is open, no questions answered, and in all honesty, pretty lame. Otherwise, I got what I expected. Some shots of the monster, a little love story and a bunch of minor goofs (such as the usage of a plane that has already been destroyed, but I guess the producers had only one available (they could have changed registration numbers though), and that skiers seem to go downhill almost always.) I think the cast did good with the material at hand, and there are no major errors in the directing either. The story is too thin, that's all. But they got to show some of Swedens landmarks... And it was fun as I have been in the region where the film was shot.
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Awful
Michael_Elliott11 March 2008
Invasion of the Animal People (1962)

* (out of 4)

A brief introduction to director Jerry Warren who is the worst in my opinion. Warren would buy foreign movies, cut out the dialogue scenes and then add newly directed scenes so that he could then sell the movie off as his own. These added scenes usually have nothing to do with the "original" movie scenes surrounding them but that can sometimes add to the charm. This film was originally a Swedish production called Terror in the Midnight Sun but Warren chopped it up, added a few scenes with John Carradine and had him serve as the narrator. A spaceship crashes in the mountains and out gets a huge, hairy creature who stalks some scientists. The look of the creature is certainly dumb enough to get a few laughs but this doesn't happen until the final ten minutes and what follows that is pretty hard to get though. Slow, boring, stupid and simply badly made. The added scenes are equally poor. However, it must be said that this is still a lot better than Warren's Attack of the Mayan Mummy and Frankenstein Island.
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A real cheapie
maschmkr23 March 1999
I have seen a lot of obscure films and am pretty sure that this one must have had the lowest budget in making it. There is a man-like creature that is HUGE- he probably stands 40-60 feet tall. Anyway the Eskimo villagers throw fire torches at it.As for the plot- there may not even be one, other than these people go out into the frozen tundra to look for a cheapie spaceship and then end up skiing half the countryside. I do however, appreciate this show's obscurity- there is , as far as I've ever seen, nothing quite like it- It makes "Plan 9 From Outer Space" look like "Gone With The Wind".
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2/10
Jerry Warren strikes out again with this pretty abominable Swedish yeti sci-fi/horror yawner
Woodyanders29 March 2007
Warning: Spoilers
Jerry Warren's second contribution to the 50's yeti creature feature cycle after the shockingly good "Man Beast" was this simply abysmal atrocity. This time Jerry took a '59 Swedish sci-fi/horror flick and shot crummy new footage with frequent co-star John Carradine in standard drippy uptight professorial mode for a shoddily slapped together mess which Warren callously released upon an unsuspecting world in '62. The only odd thing about this devious practice is that for once Jerry didn't butcher a south-of-the-border Mexican cheapie as was par for the course for Mr. Warren ("Attack of the Mayan Mummy" and "The Face of the Screaming Werewolf" are among the other cinematic crimes against humanity Jerry committed during his dubious career). The movie relates the insufferably talky'n'tedious tale of an attempted alien invasion force which sets loose a large, lumbering, murderous yeti-like beast who runs amok and wreaks the expected destructive havoc all over the desolate snow-covered Lapland countryside. An international team of scientists, complete with an annoyingly bitchy token female in tow, investigate the spaceship landing site and eventually thwart the nefarious extraterrestrials. The technical credits are strictly from hunger: the dark cinematography unleashes a hideous torrent of unsightly horrible fade-outs, the blaring score sporadically drowns out the banal dialogue (a minor blessing in disguise), screaming newspaper headlines are clumsily used to fill in gaping holes in the saggy story, the poky pace plods along with all the thrilling momentum of a snail on Quaaludes, the characters are all paper-thin cardboard cut-outs with all the appeal and charisma of a smelly dead skunk, most of the big scary moments take place off-screen, and the actors seem comatose throughout. Taking amphetamines prior to watching this clunker is optional, but nonetheless still strongly advised if you ever decide to give this stinker a stare.
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Jerry Warren's best film?
silentgpaleo1 May 2000
Unlike most of the people who have reviewed INVASION OF THE ANIMAL PEOPLE here, I actually own the film. Which is not to say that I recommend it wholly, but the film does have its quirky charms.

If you are unfamiliar with Jerry Warren films, then I'll tell you a few things about him. His films are paste-together jobs, usually bought from other countries(this one is Swiss),and reedited with unrelated footage of Americans, sitting around talking. This film has plenty of all those elements, and it looks like the original film was far better than the American version.

First of all, although the Animal Person is cheap-looking, it is a welcome change of pace. There was definitely some care put into the costume, and the way the costume was photographed. All the Animal footage was done before Warren got his hands on it.He included scenes of John Carradine and Robert Burton talking. And talking. And it never has much to do with the other film, the one directed by Virgil Vogel. But, this strange brew of film cuts and loose ends has a certain sedative quality to it. When viewing the location footage, it is fairly serene and technically sound. The climax is shoddy, but this is a minor complaint in view of the footage Warren shot.

I feel for you Vogel. INVASION...has some moments that will have you rolling in your seat, all unintentional. But, it is hard to recommend this to serious film fans because it is hardly a film, just a pistache of two separate directors' works. I would love to see the original foreign version of this film, but I will probably have to settle for the Warren-ized version. By default, this is Warren's best film, although he tried hard to undo that as well.

Skip FRANKENSTEIN ISLAND or I WAS A HIPPY VAMPIRE, and skip this one too, unless you're in the mood for a REAL BAD movie.
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1/10
1950s Swedish Sc-Fi, and definitely not from Ingmar Bergman
robertguttman12 January 2014
Mention Swedish cinema and the first thing that usually comes to most peoples' minds is the work of Ingmar Bergman; films full of excellent acting, obscure symbolism and profound psychological insights. Well, "Invasion of the Animal People" is proof that not every Swedish film- maker was up to the standards of Bergman. In fact, this one isn't even up to the standards of Edward D. Wood Jr. A lot of people consider Ed Wood's "Plan 9 from Outer Space" to be the worst movie ever made, but clearly those people have never seen "Invasion of the Animal People".

The movie begins with an over-long and obviously spliced-in monologue delivered by John Carradine, a monologue that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. That is followed by another long and also obviously added- on sequence filmed in the United States, that seems to have no relation to the remainder of the movie.

The rest of the movie involves a space ship that lands in Lapland, in Northern Sweden. This film probably enjoys the rare distinction of being the only science-fiction movie ever produced that features the people known as Laps (also referred to as "Sami"). The UFO is duly investigated by a team of scientists accompanies by a female Olympic figure skater, niece of one of the scientists who, apparently, just happened to be doing her training in Lapland.

The aliens resemble the character of "Death" from Ingmar Bergman's film, "The Seventh Seal". Have they landed in Sweden in order to play chess with Max von Sydow? Since no other reason for their presence is ever presented, I suppose that is as good an explanation as any. The aliens are also accompanied by a 30-foot-tall troll (I guess that's what they would call it in Scandinavia). How they ever managed to fit it inside their small spacecraft, and why they should have wished to being it with them in the first place, are questions that are never addressed.

Some of the other reviewers have pointed out that there exists a Swedish-language version of this movie that makes more sense. Admittedly, I have not seen that Swedish version. However, "more" is a relative term, because the version of this movie that I did see makes virtually no sense whatsoever. Nevertheless, connoisseurs of really bad 1950s science-fiction movies will definitely want to add this one to their list.
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1/10
Wow...does this film take a long, long, long time to get moving!
MartinHafer30 September 2010
For background information, try reading Michael Elliot's review--it's pretty helpful. He explains how this original film was chopped to pieces and new scenes in English were added. You wonder if what the original film actually is about--perhaps it's a very different story!! I've seen a few other films that were pieced together like this--American-International did this a lot in the 1960s.

This is really a single film marketed by Something Weird Video. Despite saying on the box that it's a "Swedish Double Feature", the two titles on the cover are the same film that has been chopped up two different ways--one with John Carradine narrating. Perhaps they didn't intend to fool the viewer, but there is only one full-length film and a few tiny special features. If you do watch it, try "Invasion of the Animal People"--it's unintentionally funnier--though the print is poorer. Also, this version lacks the nudity of the other one--making it more family-friendly.

As I watched this film, I was amazed how incredibly slow this movie was. So much of the film seems to have NOTHING to do with monsters or anything remotely scary. Instead, you see people skiing and a gratuitous nude scene that has absolutely nothing scary about it! In fact, after the initial scene of a crappy looking ship crashing in the snow, NOTHING seems to happen related to this until about 27 minutes in the film when you see a bunch of carcasses of reindeer. This made the film very slow and a bit dull...no...a LOT dull--even with the nude scene. In fact, this lady sure seemed to like to take off her clothes!! However, you don't get to really see the extremely silly monster until about 55 minutes into the movie--by which time you are dying for it all to end! Up until then, you only catch bits and pieces--a hairy arm her, the back of the head there and the like. Coming from Something Weird, I was amazed how non-weird and listless the film was--usually the films they carry are laughably bad--not dull! Or, they are chock full of sex--which this one isn't, either.

A dull flute sound track, a confusing and dull story, a monster who is silly looking but not worth the interminable wait, aliens that look like the Angel of Death from "The Seventh Sign" and an amateurish look to the entire production, this one isn't of interest to bad movie buffs like myself who enjoy films like "Plan 9" or "Eeegah!"--it's just boring and not worth bothering to see. If you do see it, skip to the last 12 minutes--at least this part is enjoyable for it's kitsch value!
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4/10
Svedish skiers encounter aliens and an Abominable guy
MartianOctocretr525 March 2007
If you like watching a bunch of people skiing around, you'll love this. An alien saucer lands in the opening round of the movie, and just sits there for about an hour of film running time before anything else involving it happens.

I saw this on one of those late night live-monster host shows, and the riffs the guy did kept the movie from being pretty boring. There's some scientists that want to see the "meteor" that came down, a romance between a couple who flirt on the ski runs, and some other folks that do a reenactment of the mob scene from Frankenstein. You have to wait a long time to see the creature, a really really big hairy guy with ugly teeth, and his brief scene is pretty campy. Still, I liked the Jolly Neanderthal Giant. As for aliens, they show up only once too, just staring at somebody. (One is seen a couple of times from the back, always watching TV).

Innocently silly and mildly amusing. There's loose ends at the end deliberately left for you to ponder. Or laugh at.
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3/10
Four time loser on Pittsburgh's Chiller Theater
kevinolzak15 November 2017
"Invasion of the Animal People," though carrying a 1961 copyright, is actually a 1958 production originally titled "Rymdinvasion i Lappland" (Space Invasion of Lappland), made in Sweden by Hollywood director Virgil Vogel, coming off a pair of marginal Universal entries, "The Mole People" and "The Land Unknown." The arctic setting certainly provides a more interesting backdrop than anything that happens on film, as a trio of aliens burrow into the snow and ice, allowing a solitary creature to escape, approximately 20 feet tall and covered in fur. We only get to see the 'animal person' during the final two reels of an 80 minute feature, actually 9 minutes longer than the original, despite several scenes of exposition shortened and streamlined. The perpetrator of this 'new' movie was our old friend Jerry Warren, a hustler adept at taking other people's films and making a fast buck out of them, adding newly shot footage of his own that adds nothing but running time. Such was the case here, as John Carradine supplies three minutes of on screen narration to open the film, after which we only occasionally hear his sterling voice propping up the deadly dull proceedings. Warren needlessly begins his version with an abominable 17 straight minutes of new dialogue heavy scenes, utilizing actress Barbara Wilson for proper continuity, so by the time we reach the original footage it's a painless rendition of the unreleased "Terror in the Midnight Sun" (interrupted by only two additional Warren-shot scenes). Gorgeous brunette Barbara Wilson did a fairly daring nude scene in the Swedish version, also a veteran of pulsating pulchritude in "Teenage Doll," "Blood of Dracula," and "The Flesh Eaters." Screenwriter Arthur C. Pierce continued in the genre vein with "The Cosmic Man," "Beyond the Time Barrier," "The Human Duplicators," "Mutiny in Outer Space," "Women of the Prehistoric Planet," "Dimension 5," "Cyborg 2087," "The Destructors," and "The Astral Factor." Jerry Warren deserves some small credit for hardly tampering with what he had, but not for the two additional reels of nonsensical claptrap. Pittsburgh's Chiller Theater aired this Carradine title on four occasions: Mar 2 1968 (followed by "Journey to the Seventh Planet"), July 26 1969 (preceded by "Godzilla vs. the Thing"), May 30 1970 (followed by "The Black Doll"), and July 24 1971 (followed by "Space Monster").
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6/10
A monster a-muck in Lappland!
JohnHowardReid8 December 2006
Warning: Spoilers
Although this movie received lukewarm reviews (when it was reviewed at all) by the London critics, I liked it. I still do, even though I now have sufficient clues to realize that a good proportion of the film was actually played by doubles. The heroine has no less than three: a girl to perform her figure skating routines, another to do all her skiing, and another to partly show off her figure in a chaste shower sequence. The hero has only a skiing stand-in to upstage his footage—but the amount of skiing material in this movie is actually quite considerable. With the addition of a song or two, plus the usual pseudo-scientific back-chat, this doesn't leave much time for the monster, an impressively cumbersome, furry giant who manages to shuffle through the snow leaving sharply delineated footprints. In true King Kong style, the heroine has plenty of screams up her sleeve, before the monster is finally pursued and disposed of in an ending rather reminiscent of Frankenstein.

Nonetheless, the snowy, ice-bound Swedish locations lend the movie more than routine interest and it must be admitted that director/editor Vogel puts this hokum across with considerable competence, cleverly using both low and high angles to re-enforce the supposed height of the killer creature, and smoothly cutting between 2nd and main unit sequences to generate a fair degree of excitement.

Stan Gester played the hero with a great deal of charm. He made over twenty movies (mostly in Sweden) from 1944 through 1962, but this seems to be his only starring role.
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1/10
I can't imagine why Lapland cinema never caught on.
soulexpress31 December 2018
Slap together a bunch of stock footage, hire John Carradine as your narrator, and come up with a cockamamie story about aliens loosing a Bigfoot-like monster in the wilds of Lapland, and you have this hour-long cinematic suppository. Take out the padding and you get about 30 seconds' worth of plot.
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3/10
Dreadful attempt at Swedish sci-fi
arthur_tafero31 August 2018
Rror in the Midnight Sun

This low-budget sci-fi is different, if nothing else. It starts off a meteor falling in Scandinavia. Then it switches to a "civilized" country where doctors smoke cigarettes on airplanes; a sure sign of consideration. We are introduced to two ugly scientists; one of which looks and acts like Borat, and the other looks and acts like Boris Bedinoff (Rocky and Bullwinkle). Finally, we introduced to the boring good-looking people who are destined to be the leads in the film. However, there was one bright spot, as one Scandinavian is dressed up as a Norte Dame cheerleader. Then we are hustled back to the boring, good-looking scientist who can't act and his medalsome (she is an Olympic Champion) new girlfriend. Then about fifteen minutes of the film is chewed up at a ski resort, while we suffer through the philandering scientist (he has a girlfriend back home). The assignment turns into a vacation at the ski lodge with a pretty skater; not quite a good sci-fi strategy. After the painful bonding of the young daters and even more painful nightclub song, we finally get to move the film forward.at the 26 minute mark; you can fast -forward to this 26 minute mark right from the first few minutes and not miss a thing. I Will not reveal the rest of the film, but it is much better than the first 26 minutes; except for the extremely annoying American Olympic skater. A spaceship carrying Bigfoot has arrived, and of course, the best thing to do is shoot first and ask questions later; for those of you not familiar with the Socratic method; that aint it. Too much skiing, and not enough plot development. Sweden needs to stick to Bergman. Not recommended.
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4/10
Cheesy monster flick from Sweden
Leofwine_draca17 February 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I saw the original 1958 Swedish version of this icebound sci-fi movie called TERROR IN THE MIDNIGHT SUN as opposed to INVASION OF THE ANIMAL PEOPLE, the version which Jerry Warren distributed on TV after cutting out extraneous material and adding John Carradine as narrator. My advice is for viewers to always watch the original versions of such films wherever possible as the repackaged versions are invariably disappointing.

TERROR IN THE MIDNIGHT SUN is a low budget and often laughable film in which very little happens during the slow-moving narrative. A cheesy meteorite crash-lands in the Arctic circle at the movie's outset and a plane-load of investigators are sent to investigate. There's also a figure skater thrown into the mix and lots of wooden dialogue from the English-dubbed actors. Eventually, and not until around the hour mark, a giant monster breaks loose and goes on a rampage. The creature looks like King Kong with a pig's snout and is completely ludicrous. The ending reminded me of THE WICKER MAN although with worse effects. Cult movie lovers will lap it up.
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5/10
Silly American/Swedish coproduction
siderite18 October 2012
The story in this film is that somewhere in Sweden there is a meteor crash. Only it's not a meteor, it's a space ship. And it has some sort of alien animal in it, probably called Laika. Hapless "investigators" of the meteor, together with a ridiculously good looking girl (her acting is equally ridiculous at times), come into conflict with the animal. The end is reminiscent of Frankenstein.

I can't say I didn't enjoy the film. It has some sort of flirting going on between sexy American girl and manly Swedish skier, a funny looking alien animal and some scenes that were really hilarious, like the one where the aliens appear and each one has a separate eerie tone associated with their appearance on the screen.

Bottom line: not completely awful, but quite a waste of time.
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3/10
Okay Swedish Fifties sci fi thriller transformed into laughably bad American movie
mlraymond9 January 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This is one of those late, late show classics that used to fill up air time in the wee hours of the morning. Now that the original Swedish version is available, it's amazing to see just how much was changed and re-edited by Jerry Warren to the point of being practically incomprehensible.

The original version may not be great art, but it does have a fairly logical plot and something resembling character development. It's worth seeing at least once. This is the version known as "Terror in the Midnight Sun".

The Jerry Warren version is familiar to American viewers as "Invasion of the Animal People" and is truly funny with its new footage of American actors mostly sitting around and talking, with portentous and solemn voice-overs by narrator John Carradine. Except for the fact that these new scenes are performed and filmed in a marginally more professional way, they could easily be mistaken for an Ed Wood movie. The truly wonderful opening has John Carradine lecturing about science and man's quest for knowledge, while sitting amidst a jumble of machines intended to give the impression of a laboratory. You could almost believe that he's stalling for time and making it up as he goes along,improvising impressive sounding phrases that actually mean very little. After the main credits, he appears again, this time standing next to a globe, as he lectures some more about how little we know about the universe around us.

All this is quite enjoyable, but the so bad it's good stuff really kicks into high gear with the next sequence, as two befuddled police detectives try to figure out why a young woman was found running around in her pajamas, apparently being pursued by a UFO. To help them out, another man joins them, holding a human skull that appears to be a Woolworth's Halloween decoration, and lectures at length on the inner ear, while they smoke cigarettes. Then, a solemn man interviews the unhappy mother of the victim, with Carradine helpfully letting us know that the scientist " had known the girl all her life".Eventually, they decide she's okay and she flies to"Switzerland" to take part in an ice skating competition and flirt with a handsome young scientist and then get carried off by a big hairy creature from a space ship.

This is simply one of the most entertaining for the wrong reasons movies I've ever seen. Aficionados of bad science fiction movies should seek this out.
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10/10
atmospheric Jerry Warren film with a nifty Animal Person
kkbasil16 October 1999
"Invasion of the Animal People" is yet another classic Jerry Warren work, up their with "Creature of the Walking Dead"(1965). Warren took existing footage and added an intro with John Carradine rambling on about nothing and some scenes with Warren regular Fred Hoffman. The plot involves some cloaked aliens landing in Lappland and a huge Animal Person who roams about. The Animal Person (not People) special effects are excellent and the aliens are cool. Plenty of Jerry Warren atmosphere in this great low-budget sci-fi flick (just beware the occasional script flaws). Perfect for a snowy afternoon.
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2/10
Ick... I want to wash this movie out of my mind.
icehole424 September 2001
You know it's a bad flick if it has Jerry Warren writing and John Carradine (The Unearthly, Night Train to Mundo Fine) narrating. (True, Carradine was also in Peggy Sue Got Married and The Secret of NIMH, but this was way before that.) Bad special effects crush this movie's hope of ever being decent. This one is one that MST3K didn't do, but should have.

Nice to see Sampo isn't the only bad Swedish movie.
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