Ride Lonesome (1959) - News Poster

(1959)

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Comanche Station (Einer Gibt Nicht Auf)

Randolph Scott's final 'Ranown' western is a minimalist masterpiece, an unusually gentle story about a great westerner on a forlorn romantic quest. It's also a showcase for the underrated Nancy Gates and Claude Akins, and a pleasure to watch in wide, wide CinemaScope. Comanche Station All-region Blu-ray Explosive Media / Alive 1960 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 74 min. / Street Date July 22, 2016 / Einer Gibt Nicht Auf / available at Amazon.de/ EUR14,99 Starring Randolph Scott, Nancy Gates, Claude Atkins, Skip Homeier, Richard Rust. Cinematography Charles Lawton Jr. Film Editor Edwin H. Bryant Music supervisor Mischa Balaleinikoff Written by Burt Kennedy Produced and Directed by Budd Boetticher

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

One must be careful when ordering Blu-ray discs of Hollywood films from overseas. Foreign distributors license American movies that the studios won't release here, but sometimes they don't have access to good video masters. In a few cases the films being offered are simply being pirated.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Happy Ending

Jean Simmons is the original frustrated Mad Housewife who runs away from a 'dream marriage' in search of something more fulfilling. Uncompromising, adult, and making use of an interesting cast. Plus, the soundtrack uses Michel Legrand's incomparable song "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" The Happy Ending Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 112 min. / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Jean Simmons, John Forsythe, Shirley Jones, Teresa Wright, Nanette Fabray, Bobby Darin, Kathy Fields, Tina Louise, Dick Shawn, Lloyd Bridges, Karen Steele, Erin Moran. Cinematography Conrad Hall Original Music Michel Legrand, lyrics Alan & Marilyn Bergman Produced, Written and Directed by Richard Brooks

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I looked at some of the poster artwork for The Happy Ending, and yes indeed, one of the main styles is indeed like the cover of this disc -- a photo of a rusty garbage
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Forsaken’

If “Forsaken” were any more old-fashioned, lenser Rene Ohashi might have filmed it in black-and-white, scripter Brad Mirman definitely would have trimmed the F-bombs from his dialogue, and the entire enterprise probably would bear the brand of Rko or Republic Pictures. Refreshingly and unabashedly sincere in its embrace of Western conventions and archetypes, this pleasingly retrograde sagebrush saga should play exceptionally well with currently under-served genre fans — except, perhaps, for those with low tolerance for salty language – and likely will enjoy a long shelf life as home-screen product after potentially profitable exposure in theatrical corrals.

The first-time onscreen pairing of Kiefer Sutherland and his dad, Donald Sutherland — as a prodigal son and his disapproving father — is a natural selling point for the film, one that conceivably could attract curiosity seekers not normally interested in oaters. But the casting also serves to enhance the emotional heft of the familiar storyline. These
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Coburn: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

I interviewed James Coburn in late 1998 for the cover story of the February 1999 issue of Venice Magazine. I had grown up watching Coburn on the late show, but also seeing him on the big screen, first-run. Meeting him was a thrill as he entered the living room of his manager, the late Hilly Elkins', home in Beverly Hills. Coburn was elegant, charming and had the grace of a cat. The only thing that revealed the health problems that had nearly done him in were his gnarled hands, the result of severe arthritis. We spoke about his role in Paul Schrader's newest film, "Affliction," which would earn him a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award. Later, as I walked Coburn to his Acura Nsx sport coupe, he bid me a warm farewell.

Several months later, I encountered him again at The Independent Spirit Awards, in Santa Monica. I went up
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Notebook's 6th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2013

  • MUBI
Looking back over the year at what films moved and impressed us, it is clear that watching old films is a crucial part of making new films meaningful. Thus, the annual tradition of our end of year poll, which calls upon our writers to pick both a new and an old film: they were challenged to choose a new film they saw in 2013—in theaters or at a festival—and creatively pair it with an old film they also saw in 2013 to create a unique double feature.

All the contributors were given the option to write some text explaining their 2013 fantasy double feature. What's more, each writer was given the option to list more pairings, with or without explanation, as further imaginative film programming we'd be lucky to catch in that perfect world we know doesn't exist but can keep dreaming of every time we go to the movies.

How
See full article at MUBI »

Top Western Star: Squared-Jawed Scott

Randolph Scott Westerns, comedies, war dramas: TCM schedule on August 19, 2013 See previous post: “Cary Grant and Randolph Scott Marriages — And ‘Expect the Biographical Worst.’” 3:00 Am Badman’S Territory (1946). Director: Tim Whelan. Cast: Randolph Scott, George ‘Gabby’ Hayes, Ann Richards. Bw-98 mins. 4:45 Am Trail Street (1947). Director: Ray Enright. Cast: Randolph Scott, Robert Ryan, Anne Jeffreys. Bw-84 mins. 6:15 Am Return Of The Badmen (1948). Director: Ray Enright. Cast: Randolph Scott, Robert Ryan, Anne Jeffreys, George ‘Gabby’ Hayes, Jacqueline White, Steve Brodie, Tom Keene aka Richard Powers, Robert Bray, Lex Barker, Walter Reed, Michael Harvey, Dean White, Robert Armstrong, Tom Tyler, Lew Harvey, Gary Gray, Walter Baldwin, Minna Gombell, Warren Jackson, Robert Clarke, Jason Robards Sr., Ernie Adams, Lane Chandler, Dan Foster, John Hamilton, Kenneth MacDonald, Donald Kerr, Ida Moore, ‘Snub’ Pollard, Harry Shannon, Charles Stevens. Bw-90 mins. 8:00 Am Riding Shotgun (1954). Director: André De Toth. Cast: Randolph Scott, Wayne Morris,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Classic Western Star on TCM

Randolph Scott movies: From Westerns to Cary Grant / Irene Dunne comedy Handsome, granite-faced Randolph Scott is Turner Classic Movies’ next great choice in its "Summer Under the Stars" film series. Monday, August 19, 2013, is Randolph Scott Day, which begins and ends with Westerns. That shouldn’t be surprising, for although Scott was initially cast in a variety of roles and movie genres (including Westerns), he became exclusively a Western star in the late ’40s, sticking to that genre until his retirement in 1962 following the release of Sam Peckinpah’s elegiac Ride the High Country, which TCM will be showing on Monday evening. Joel McCrea at his very best and Mariette Hartley co-star. (See “On TCM: Randolph Scott Westerns.”) (Photo: Randolph Scott ca. 1945.) Many of Scott’s Westerns were routine fare, including Badman’s Territory (1946), which kicks off Randolph Scott Day. Some, however, have become classics of the genre, especially his late
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Director & Actor Teams: The Overlooked & Underrated (Part 1 of 2)

Cinema is a kind of uber-art form that’s made up of a multitude of other forms of art including writing, directing, acting, drawing, design, photography and fashion. As such, film is, as all cinema aficionados know, a highly collaborative venture.

One of the most consistently fascinating collaborations in cinema is that of the director and actor.

This article will examine some of the great director & actor teams. It’s important to note that this piece is not intended as a film history survey detailing all the generally revered collaborations.

There is a wealth of information and study available on such duos as John Ford & John Wayne, Howard Hawks & John Wayne, Elia Kazan & Marlon Brando, Akira Kurosawa & Toshiro Mifune, Alfred Hitchcock & James Stewart, Ingmar Bergman & Max Von Sydow, Federico Fellini & Giulietta Masina/Marcello Mastroianni, Billy Wilder & Jack Lemmon, Francis Ford Coppola & Al Pacino, Woody Allen & Diane Keaton, Martin Scorsese & Robert DeNiro
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Making Of The West: Mythmakers and truth-tellers

The “adult” Western – as it would come to be called – was a long time coming. A Hollywood staple since the days of The Great Train Robbery (1903), the Western offered spectacle and action set against the uniquely American milieu of the Old West – a historical period which, at the dawn of the motion picture industry, was still fresh in the nation’s memory. What the genre rarely offered was dramatic substance.

Early Westerns often adopted the same traditions of the popular Wild West literature and dime novels of the 19th and early 20th centuries producing, as a consequence, highly romantic, almost purely mythic portraits the Old West. Through the early decades of the motion picture industry, the genre went through several creative cycles, alternately tilting from fanciful to realistic and back again. By the early sound era, and despite such serious efforts as The Big Trail (1930) and The Virginian (1929), Hollywood Westerns were,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Cinematical Seven: Western Hotties

Cinematical Seven: Western Hotties
Isn't there something kind of hot about a cowgirl? I'm not sure what it is. Maybe it's the long hair spilling out from under the cowboy hat, or the way they can gaze out mysteriously from just under the brim. Maybe it's the jeans and the boots, or maybe it's the "southern belle" factor. The fact is that Megan Fox is the latest Western hottie to hit the screens, playing "Lilah" in Jonah Hex. She has her plusses and minuses; whenever she comes up in conversation among female friends, I usually explain how "plastic" she is, as if she's a manufactured pleasure-bot. But truthfully, she's pretty darn hot, with those pale blue eyes, raven hair, perfectly-shaped lips, and perfectly-shaped everything else. Clad in what looks like a cross between Stetson and Victoria's Secret, she is, indeed, the latest in a long line of hot movie cowgirls. Here are seven others.
See full article at Cinematical »

The 40 Greatest "Unloved" Films

The 40 Greatest
Over the past couple of years, the indefatigable Iain Stott over at The On-Line Review has conducted several polls of film critics and film buffs (yours truly included). First he created a list of the 50 Greatest Films, which frankly, turned out pretty much the same as all the other polls of the 50 greatest films. So Iain started all over again, and sent out a new poll called Beyond the Canon. In this one, he gave us a list of films that were ineligible, films like Citizen Kane, Vertigo and The Rules of the Game that were already very well represented in the "canon." We could send in a ballot with anything we wanted, provided it did not appear on the ineligible list. That list turned out pretty well, but it still received some gripes from purists. So now Iain has gone still further and come up with a new poll,
See full article at Cinematical »

Liverpool—Interview With Lisandro Alonso

I was so impressed with Lisandro Alonso’s Liverpool when it screened at the 2008 Toronto International Film Festival that—not only did I write it up right away for Twitch and The Evening Class—but I actively pursued and scored an interview. Since writing up Liverpool nearly a year ago, I’ve read commentary here and there that has deepened my appreciation of the film. Most noteworthy is James Quandt’s ArtForum essay “Ride Lonesome” (available at Highbeam Research Library). “Ride Lonesome” is an especially impressive piece of criticism, tackling all of Alonso’s films, while specifically noting: “Liverpool seems designed for auteurial legibility.” Praising Alonso’s “dilatory style”, Quandt adds that Liverpool “keeps to [Alonso’s] antidramatic ways, attenuating narrative through empty time and withheld information.” Of related interest: Violeta Kovacsics and Adam Nayman’s interview for Cinema Scope; Darren Hughes interview for Senses of Cinema; and R. Emmett Sweeney’s interview for The Rumpus.
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Best DVDs of 2008

  • The AV Club
With on-demand and digital options threatening to make physical discs obsolete and the extremely impressive Blu-Ray format currently doing little but reissuing favorites from studios' increasingly picked-over vaults, the golden age of DVDs might be over. But we still easily found 10 items that make the format seem far from dead. 1. The Films Of Budd Boetticher (Columbia) Practically since the invention of the DVD, fans of classic westerns have been clamoring for the release of the seven films director Budd Boetticher made with star Randolph Scott between 1956 and 1960. In 2006, Paramount released a nice edition of the first film in the series, 7 Men From Now, and this year Columbia followed suit with the five in their vaults: Buchanan Rides Alone, Comanche Station, Decision At Sundown, and the two masterpieces Ride Lonesome and The Tall T. The set adds a superb feature-length documentary about...
See full article at The AV Club »

On DVD: The Films of Budd Boetticher, "Camp de Thiaroye"

  • IFC
By Michael Atkinson

The last of the red hot Golden Age Hollywood genre buckaroos, Budd Boetticher represented a long-vanished prototype: the man's man studio director who, before turning gruffly to making pictures, had spent years being a boxer or a stevedore or a soldier or what have you. Today, filmmakers pay their dues by earning six figures shooting shampoo commercials; then, a man who made westerns or war movies or gangster films was a man who had lived in the world and returned with a heartful of brutal and hopeful business you can't learn by watching other movies. In a sense, Boetticher outdid the competition by becoming a professional Mexican matador right out of college -- a scenario difficult to beat for hard-won iron-man chops in Tinseltown. Of course his biography influences how his best films -- the westerns he made between 1956 and 1960 -- have been perceived and why they've been canonized,
See full article at IFC »

Gems Are Best Westerns

Oscar "Budd" Boetticher may not be as well known a Western director as John Ford, but he's got quite a fan club among filmmakers - Clint Eastwood and Quentin Tarantino, for starters.

Martin Scorsese and Taylor Hackford join them in singing the director's praises in a feature-length documentary included in the long-awaited "The Films of Budd Boetticher," a DVD set out today from Sony. It is the first effort in a collaboration with the Film Foundation,
See full article at New York Post »

Oscar-Winning Actor James Coburn Dies at 74

Oscar-Winning Actor James Coburn Dies at 74
James Coburn, the tough-guy actor known for his roles in The Magnificent Seven and Our Man Flint, died Monday at age 74 of a heart attack. Coburn was at his Beverly Hills home with his wife Paula when he suffered a massive coronary at 4:30 p.m. PST; he was rushed to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. The tall, imposing actor with the wicked grin won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1998 for Paul Schrader's Affliction, in which he played the abusive, alcoholic father of Nick Nolte, capping an illustrious career that began with the 1959 Western Ride Lonesome. Another Western a year later, The Magnificent Seven, made Coburn a name actor and catapulted him into roles in major Hollywood features, including Hell Is For Heroes, Charade, The Great Escape, and The Americanization of Emily. He achieved his greatest success as suave secret agent Derek Flint in Our Man Flint (1966) and In Like Flint (1967), which were considered the best James Bond spoofs ever made, and an inspiration for the Austin Powers films. Character roles followed in the 70s, including The Last of Shelia, Bite the Bullet, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid and Cross of Iron. Coburn also achieved a comeback in the 90s, after he overcame a 15-year battle with rheumatoid arthritis that threatened his career in the 80s, when he scaled back his film appearances dramatically. In the past ten years, he appeared in films as varied as Young Guns II, The Nutty Professor, Maverick, and lent his voice to last year's hit film Monsters Inc. ; in all, he made over 100 movies. Coburn is survived by his wife, two children, Lisa and James Jr., and two grandchildren.

Oscar-Winning Actor James Coburn Dies at 74

  • WENN
Oscar-Winning Actor James Coburn Dies at 74
James Coburn, the tough-guy actor known for his roles in The Magnificent Seven and Our Man Flint, died Monday at age 74 of a heart attack. Coburn was at his Beverly Hills home with his wife Paula when he suffered a massive coronary at 4:30 p.m. PST; he was rushed to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. The tall, imposing actor with the wicked grin won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1998 for Paul Schrader's Affliction, in which he played the abusive, alcoholic father of Nick Nolte, capping an illustrious career that began with the 1959 Western Ride Lonesome. Another Western a year later, The Magnificent Seven, made Coburn a name actor and catapulted him into roles in major Hollywood features, including Hell Is For Heroes, Charade, The Great Escape, and The Americanization of Emily. He achieved his greatest success as suave secret agent Derek Flint in Our Man Flint (1966) and In Like Flint (1967), which were considered the best James Bond spoofs ever made, and an inspiration for the Austin Powers films. Character roles followed in the 70s, including The Last of Shelia, Bite the Bullet, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid and Cross of Iron. Coburn also achieved a comeback in the 90s, after he overcame a 15-year battle with rheumatoid arthritis that threatened his career in the 80s, during which he scaled back his film appearances dramatically. In the past ten years, he appeared in films as varied as Young Guns II, The Nutty Professor, Maverick, and lent his voice to last year's hit film Monsters Inc. ; in all, he made over 100 movies. Coburn is survived by his wife, two children, Lisa and James Jr., and two grandchildren.

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