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Pillow Talk (1959) Poster

(1959)

Trivia

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Ross Hunter wrote that after he made this film, no theatre managers wanted to book it. Popular movie themes at the time were war films, westerns, and spectacles. Hunter was told by the big movie chains that sophisticated comedies like this movie went out with William Powell. They also believed that Doris Day and Rock Hudson were things of the past and had been overtaken by newer stars. Hunter persuaded Sol Schwartz, who owned the Palace Theatre in New York, to book the film for a two-week run, and it was a smash hit. The public had been starved for romantic comedy, and theatre owners who had previously turned down Hunter now had to deal with him on HIS terms.
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Rock Hudson turned down the film three times, believing the script to be "too risqué".
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This movie would be the first of three to showcase the trio of Doris Day, Rock Hudson, and Tony Randall. It was followed by Lover Come Back (1961) and Send Me No Flowers (1964), with all three actors portraying different roles in each.
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After Jonathan (Tony Randall) slaps Jan (Doris Day) in the diner, a truck driver (John Indrisano) punches him in the jaw. In an interview, Randall said that he and Indrisano practised the punch many times, and Indrisano assured him that he would not be hit. During the take, Indrisano misjudged, and Randall actually was struck and knocked unconscious.
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In describing his interest in getting this film made, producer Ross Hunter reportedly said: "I always thought Doris Day had one of the wildest asses in Hollywood, and I thought it was time she showed it off!"
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Spanish TV screened this movie on 20th July 1969 while everybody was waiting for the Apollo landing on the Moon. Suddenly, the film stopped, and Spanish people could see the landing live. The film was not reshown on Spanish TV until 1999, when Spanish viewers finally could see the ending.
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Among this film's distinguishing elements is its innovative use of the wide-screen format, specifically its sly sexual innuendos created by split screen optics, the most famous of which suggests Doris Day and Rock Hudson are sharing a bathtub and that his toes sliding down the wall tickle her instep.
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Despite being contractually bound by Universal to do the film, Rock Hudson consistently declined it, fearing it was too dirty and would harm his masculine image. Doris Day finally talked him into starring in it, and it subsequently became one of his biggest hits.
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Rock Hudson insisted he would not make the film unless Nick Adams was given a part.
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Marilyn Monroe wanted to play Jan Morrow.
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Michael Gordon had hoped to make a sequel to this movie in 1980. It would be set 20 years after the events of this movie and would involve Brad and Jan's first daughter, played by Kristy McNichol, with Gregory Harrison as her boyfriend. Brad and Jan would divorce, which would allow Jonathan to woo Jan again. Jan would scheme to get Brad back, while he would do some scamming of his own. Doris Day and Rock Hudson were both interested in returning for the sequel, but it never materialized, with Day's retirement from acting being a factor.
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The film for which Doris Day earned her only Oscar nomination.
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Doris Day acknowledged that this movie transformed her image from "the girl next door" to classy, sophisticated sex symbol since the plot, for its time, was considered quite sexy.
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Rock Hudson's first comedy.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the 500 movies nominated for the Top 100 Funniest American Movies.
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Julia Meade (Marie) did a commercial every Sunday night live on Ed Sullivan's show, The Ed Sullivan Show (1948), in New York City. So every Saturday, she flew back to New York City.
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At one point in the movie, Doris Day says that Rock Hudson's character is 6 foot 6 inches tall. He was really 6 foot 4 inches tall, but adding to his height made short actors like Tony Randall and Nick Adams seem taller. They were both 5 foot 8 inches or shorter.
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Doris Day and Rock Hudson were never romantically involved: she took her marriage vows seriously, and he was a deeply closeted gay man. However, from the moment they met, an immediate mutual respect resulted in a lifelong friendship and a prankster-ish sense of fun that radiated from the screen whenever they worked together.
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The Production Code Administration (PCA) initially balked at the movie's title, but producer Ross Hunter refused to change it.
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Down with Love (2003) is an homage to the sex comedies that were popular in the late 1950s and early 1960s, particularly the three Doris Day-Rock Hudson-Tony Randall collaborations (this movie, Lover Come Back (1961), and Send Me No Flowers (1964)). Randall himself had a cameo in the film.
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Early on, Tony Randall tells Rock Hudson that he has eight million dollars (in 1959). Corrected for inflation, in 2021, Randall's bank account would be equivalent to nearly $72M.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
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Doris Day and Thelma Ritter would appear together again in Move Over, Darling (1963).
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Patricia Hitchcock was asked in an interview, if there was a film that her father, Alfred Hitchcock missed out on. She replied, "He wanting to direct Pillow Talk (1959)."
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The Mercedes Tony Randall drives is a 300 SL.
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The bathtub conversation scene gets an updated, quirky twist in the X Files episode "Hollywood A.D."
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The Four In Hand carriage scene makes a quick appearance in "That Touch of Mink," but in a different location. The plot, however, is pretty much the same
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The first scene that was shot was the one towards the end of the movie in which Rock Hudson drags Doris Day out of bed and carries her through the streets of New York to his apartment. After many takes, Hudson's arms were hurting, so they created a sort of sling which held Day in a crate-like device and hooked over Hudson's shoulders to evenly distribute her weight.
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The original had an abrupt ending: Jan used the special switch to lock the door to Brad's apartment and simply said, "All apartments look alike in the dark." This open ending was changed to have Brad and Jan get married and expecting a baby together.
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Allen Jenkins is mentioned in M*A*S*H: Rainbow Bridge (1974), as the bus driver for Mutiny on the Bus, a nod to this role as the elevator operator.
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This film and its follow-up Lover Come Back (1961) each borrows the main plot structure from a previous Doris Day film, Teacher's Pet (1958). In all three films, Day plays a professional single woman who is aware of--by reputation only--the male lead (Clark Gable or Rock Hudson). She despises him, so when he ultimately meets and is physically attracted to her, he knows he hasn't got a chance given how she feels about him. Since she only knows him by reputation, he assumes a false identity and pursues her. She falls in love with him and he with her. When she discovers who he really is, she rejects him, but the love that grew during their fake relationship proves stronger than any negative feelings she has for him.
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