Operation Petticoat (1959) - News Poster

News

Review: "Father Goose" (1964) Starring Cary Grant And Leslie Caron; Olive Films Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Cary Grant was one of the few actors to defy the effects of aging. The older he got, the more popular his films became. By the late 1950s Grant had become uncomfortable making movies because he realized audiences only wanted to see him as a romantic lead and he felt self-conscious about studio insistence that he be seen on screen romancing female leads who were often decades younger than him. Nonetheless, Grant kept forestalling his frequent vows to retire from acting. He had taken much more control over his career by forming his own production company and the result were some of the biggest hits of his career ("Operation Petticoat", "That Touch of Mink", "Charade"). Grant's primary motivation for not retiring was his desire- or rather, obsession- with winning an Oscar. Alfred Hitchcock had advised him that the best way to do so was to get away
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tuesday Blus: Arturo Ripstein’s Time to Die, John Trengove’s The Wound, Etc.

This week’s edition of Tuesday Blus includes the following titles:

The Wound (2017) – Kino Lorber / Maigret Sets a Trap (1958) – Kino Lorber / Maigret and the St Fiacre Case (1959) – Kino Lorber / Valdez is Coming (1971) – Kino Lorber / Heat and Dust (1983) – Cohen Media Group / Operation Petticoat (1958) – Olive Films / Time to Die (1966) – Film Movement / The Unknown Girl (2016) – Sundance Selects (DVD) / False Confessions (2016) – Big World Pictures (DVD).

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Operation Petticoat

Tony Curtis grew up idolizing the suave and funny Cary Grant, emulated his romantic moves as an actor and then performed a brilliant impersonation of Grant for Billy Wilder. The next step had to be co-starring with the great man himself. Blake Edwards’ amiable, relaxed submarine movie allows Grant to play with ladies’ under-things, while Curtis wrestles with a pig.

Operation Petticoat

Blu-ray

Olive Signature Edition

1959 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 120 min. / Street Date July 1, 2014 / available through the Olive Films website / 39.95

Starring: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Joan O’Brien, Dina Merrill, Gene Evans, Dick Sargent, Virginia Gregg, Gavin MacLeod, Madlyn Rhue, Marion Ross, Arthur O’Connell.

Cinematography: Russell Harlan

Original Music: David Rose

Written by Paul King, Joseph Stone, Stanley Shapiro, Maurice Richlin

Produced by Robert Arthur

Directed by Blake Edwards

The latest in Olive Films’ Signature Selection special editions is Operation Petticoat, a light comedy war movie noted for teaming Cary Grant with Tony Curtis.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Edwards Pt 2: The Pink Panther Sequels and Famous Silent Film Era Step-grandfather Director

'The Pink Panther' with Peter Sellers: Blake Edwards' 1963 comedy hit and its many sequels revolve around one of the most iconic film characters of the 20th century: clueless, thick-accented Inspector Clouseau – in some quarters surely deemed politically incorrect, or 'insensitive,' despite the lack of brown face make-up à la Sellers' clueless Indian guest in Edwards' 'The Party.' 'The Pink Panther' movies [1] There were a total of eight big-screen Pink Panther movies co-written and directed by Blake Edwards, most of them starring Peter Sellers – even after his death in 1980. Edwards was also one of the producers of every (direct) Pink Panther sequel, from A Shot in the Dark to Curse of the Pink Panther. Despite its iconic lead character, the last three movies in the Pink Panther franchise were box office bombs. Two of these, The Trail of the Pink Panther and Curse of the Pink Panther, were co-written by Edwards' son,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Pink Panther' Filmmaker at His Best Handling More Subtle Fare - Both Comedies and Dead Serious Dramas

Blake Edwards: Director of the 'Pink Panther' movies – and Julie Andrews' husband for more than four decades – was at his best handling polished comedies and a couple of dead serious dramas. Blake Edwards movies: Best known for slapstick fare, but at his best handling polished comedies and dramas The Pink Panther and its sequels[1] are the movies most closely associated with screenwriter-director-producer Blake Edwards, whose film and television career spanned more than half a century.[2] But unless you're a fan of Keystone Kops-style slapstick, they're the filmmaker's least interesting efforts. In fact, Edwards (born William Blake Crump in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on July 26, 1922) was at his best (co-)writing and/or directing polished comedies (e.g., Operation Petticoat, Victor Victoria) and, less frequently, dramas (Days of Wine and Roses, the romantic comedy-drama Breakfast at Tiffany's). The article below and follow-up posts offer a brief look at some of Blake Edwards' non-Pink Panther comedies,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dina Merrill obituary

Heiress and philanthropist who became a Hollywood star playing poised, upper-class women

There has seldom been more closeness between an acting career and a lifestyle than that of Dina Merrill, who has died aged 93. As an heiress, socialite and philanthropist, Merrill had little trouble portraying upper-crust women in films and television. Her patrician allure led her to be proclaimed “Hollywood’s new Grace Kelly” in 1959. Alas, Merrill was seldom given the chance to shine as much as the star who became a princess. Nevertheless, she had a long career in films from the mid-50s to the mid-60s, and appeared regularly on television from 1955.

Perhaps she was best known on the big screen as Tony Curtis’s love interest in Blake EdwardsOperation Petticoat (1959). The action comedy starred Cary Grant, who had been married to Merrill’s cousin, the Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton. Almost as celebrated was her role
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93

Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93
Dina Merrill, a beautiful, blonde actress with an aristocratic bearing known as much for her wealthy origins, philanthropy, and marriage to actor Cliff Robertson as for her work in film and television, died on Monday at her home in East Hampton, N.Y. She was 93.

Her son, Stanley H. Rumbough, told the New York Times that Merrill had Lewy Body dementia.

Her parents were Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, and her second husband, Wall Street’s E.F. Hutton.

In 1983, on the occasion of Merrill’s musical comedy debut in a revival of Rodgers and Hart’s 1936 musical ”On Your Toes,” the New York Times gushed, “Long regarded as the essence of chic, the epitome of class and such a persuasive purveyor of charm and charity that she could have a rightful claim to fame as an eloquent spokesman — and fund-raiser — for a slew of worthy causes, Miss Merrill
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93

Dina Merrill, Elegant Actress and Philanthropist, Dies at 93
Dina Merrill, a beautiful, blonde actress with an aristocratic bearing known as much for her wealthy origins, philanthropy, and marriage to actor Cliff Robertson as for her work in film and television, died on Monday at her home in East Hampton, N.Y. She was 93.

Her son, Stanley H. Rumbough, told the New York Times that Merrill had Lewy Body dementia.

Her parents were Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, and her second husband, Wall Street’s E.F. Hutton.

In 1983, on the occasion of Merrill’s musical comedy debut in a revival of Rodgers and Hart’s 1936 musical ”On Your Toes,” the New York Times gushed, “Long regarded as the essence of chic, the epitome of class and such a persuasive purveyor of charm and charity that she could have a rightful claim to fame as an eloquent spokesman — and fund-raiser — for a slew of worthy causes, Miss Merrill has evoked instant recognition and elegant associations
See full article at Variety - TV News »

"Operation Petticoat" A Victory In The War On Progress

Newly available on Blu-ray, Operation Petticoat stars two of Hollywood’s ultimate leading men, Cary Grant and Tony Curtis, in a madcap, candy-colored comedy about two very different officers on a battered submarine in the Pacific during World War II, and what happens when five female Army nurses come aboard. Directed by Blake Edwards (The Pink Panther, among many others), it was released in 1959 and showcases two of the biggest stars in the history of cinema at their brightest and most boisterous--even if the story itself leaves something to be desired.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

‘Afflicted’ and ‘Operation Petticoat’ Are the Best New Blu-ray/DVD Releases of the Week

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. Operation Petticoat The USS Sea Tiger has seen better days as a Navy sub during World War II, but it hasn’t seen any action. Commander Sherman (Cary Grant) would like the chance to rectify that before the boat is sent to a watery grave, and with the help of a shifty junior officer (Tony Curtis) he sets out to give the Sea Tiger one last shot at glory. Who knew it would come with an assist from five Army nurses in need of a lift? This 1959 comedy classic has been on my list of shame for far too long so it was great to not only finally see it but also to discover just how fantastic it truly is. Grant is as charming as ever here playing a wonderful combination of suave and frazzled
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

New DVD Blu-ray: 'Like Father, Like Son,' 'The Killing: Third Season'

Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week

"Like Father, Like Son"

What's It About? Two families are thrown into upheaval when it's discovered there was a mistake at the hospital where their respective sons were born. Ryota (Masaharu Fukuyama) has to decide what's more important to him, the relationship he's developed with the six-year-old child he thought was his biological son or his "real" son. Hirokazu Kore-eda explores what it means to be a family and a father in this intimate drama.

Why We're In: Kore-eda's a critically acclaimed filmmaker and beloved arthouse auteur whose work deserves to be seen on a wider scale. Don't let the subtitles scare you -- check it out!

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week

"Cry-Baby"

What's It About? Johnny Depp plays a swoon-worthy bad boy who falls for Allison (Amy Locane), a sweet girl who's feeling a little feisty. This doesn't sit well with Allison's
See full article at Moviefone »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Operation Petticoat

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: July 1, 2014

Price: DVD $19.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Cary Grant and Joan O'Brien hit the deck in Operation Petticoat.

The 1959 comedy Operation Petticoat starring Cary Grant (To Catch a Thief) and Tony Curtis (Sweet Smell of Success) makes it’s Blu-ray debut courtesy of Olive Films.

Operation Petticoat begins as Commander Matt Sherman (Grant) has his toughest assignment yet – to put a broken sardine can of a submarine back in action. Enter supply officer Nick Holden (Curtis), a master scavenger who has some very shady plans to get the Sea Tiger purring again. Said plans become quite apparent after the crew rescues five stranded beautiful nurses and the grey, battle-scarred sub is suddenly painted a blushingly bold pink, thus transforming into a party-ready hot tub sub for all who come aboard.

One of the earlier movies on director Blake Edward’s (Breakfast at Tiffany’s) filmography, Operation Petticoat
See full article at Disc Dish »

Pop culture retrospective: Women in the military

Pop culture retrospective: Women in the military
In honor of Wednesday’s news that U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has decided to lift the 1994 ban on women serving in ground combat units, we decided to take a quick look at some portrayals of women in the military in pop culture.

Many of these are far from feminist representations of women in service, and in fact, most of the time, they’re pretty much the complete opposite — exaggerating stereotypical “femininity” in the face of combat, and using it for comedy. But there are a few standout films and TV shows — like China Beach and Courage Under Fire
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Review: "High Time" (1960) Starring Bing Crosby On Blu-ray

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Twilight Time has released the 1960 comedy High Time  starring Bing Crosby as a limited edition (3,000 units) Blu-ray. Crosby's career as an actor has largely been neglected over the decades despite the fact that he was one of the most enduring boxoffice giants of his time. Perhaps the reason is that, unlike Frank Sinatra, who took on dramatic and challenging roles, Crosby was largely content to stick with playing amiable crooners in glossy, feel-good musicals. One such film is High Time, which was originally developed as a comedy titled Big Daddy for Gary Cooper. However, when Cooper became terminally ill, Crosby's production company picked up the option as a starring vehicle for Crosby himself. Der Bingle plays Harvey Howard, a 51-year-old self-made businessman who owns a national chain of popular smokehouse restaurants. Harvey decides to fulfill his dream of becoming the first family member to obtain a college degree.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Ingmar Bergman vs. the Oscar

Ingmar Bergman Jean Dujardin, Meryl Streep, Christopher Plummer, Michel Hazanavicius, Octavia Spencer, and surely Harvey Weinstein are thrilled they and/or their movies won Academy Awards last night at Hollywood & Highland. Not every Oscar nominee/winner, however, has felt that way. The Criterion Collection has posted (via dizzydentfilms) a May 12, 1960, letter in which Ingmar Bergman scolded the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for nominating his 1957 drama Wild Strawberries for a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award in 1960. (Wild Strawberries was shown in Los Angeles in 1959.) Here's the text of Bergman's letter, which was displayed at the 2010 Academy exhibit "Ingmar Bergman: Truth and Lies": As Smultronstället (Wild Strawberries) didn't compete for "Oscar" I think it is wrong to nominate the picture and therefor [sic] I want to return the "Certificate Of Nomination". I have found that the "Oscar" nomination is one for the motion picture art humiliating institution and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Lgbt News: Cary Grant daughter speaks out about life with gay father?

Lgbt News! Cary Grant daughter speaks out about life with gay father? [May 4] Discussing your sexuality or sexual orientation, is a difficulty step, especially when you are a Hollywood screen legend, such as Cary Grant. During his career as an actor in films like North by Northwest with costar James Mason and Operation Petticoat alongside Tony Curtis, Grant was viewed as a strong man, often portrayed as a single, swinging bachelor in his movies. Who would have thought this strong actor was gay too? Grant’s daughter, Jennifer Grant has now released a memoir titled Good Stuff discussing the relationship she shared with her gay father, how he adored her, and what she thought of his career. With so much legislation taking place within the Lgbt community regarding gay marriages, proposed constitutional amendments, and the move for increased same-sex relationship rights, it appears Jennifer Grant has released her memoir at the perfect time.
See full article at Green Celebrity »

Blake Edwards Homage on TCM: Breakfast At Tiffany's, Victor Victoria, The Pink Panther

Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, Breakfast at Tiffany's Blake Edwards, who died this past Dec. 15 at the age of 88, will be celebrated by Turner Classic Movies on Monday evening with the presentation of five of Edwards' best-known efforts: Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), Days of Wine and Roses (1962), The Pink Panther (1964), Victor / Victoria (1982), and Operation Petticoat (1959). Apart from The Pink Panther — I'm no fan of Peter Sellers' slapstick comedy — I'd highly recommend the other four movies. Not that they're all great; but they all provide excellent opportunities for their mostly first-rate performers. Audrey Hepburn is delightful as a free-spirited call girl in Breakfast at Tiffany's, a shamelessly bowdlerized but still entertaining version of Truman Capote's novel. Just don't think of Hepburn's Holly Golightly as a "call girl" or as anyone remotely associated with sex. Patricia Neal provides more than able support. Days of Wine [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blake Edwards

“How do you thank someone for a million laughs?” With the passing of Blake Edwards, one of the very last survivors of the golden age of pictures has gone. At 88, he had seen the whole parade: his grandfather was a silent film director, his father was in the business, and Blake started out as an actor in the l940s, eventually turned to screenwriting---quite successfully---and then to directing in the mid-l950s. Over the years, he had an impressive array of popular and superbly made pictures, including Breakfast at Tiffany’s (probably Audrey Hepburn’s most iconic appearance), Operation Petticoat (Cary Grant’s biggest…
See full article at Blogdanovich »

John Corbett joins 'Parenthood'; 'Bones' actor heads to 'Hawaii Five-0'

TV news bites to keep you going for the holidays home stretch:

You'll see Sarah's ex on "Parenthood" in 2011, and he'll look a lot like John Corbett. The "United States of Tara" star will have a recurring part on the NBC show as Sarah's (Lauren Graham) screwup of an ex-husband, who hasn't been seen since the show's pilot (and who was played by Darin Heames at the time). [Deadline]

Occasional "Bones" squint and "Avatar" co-star Joel David Moore will guest on an episode of "Hawaii Five-0" in the new year. He'll play the deputy director of a tsunami tracking center whom the team calls on in a crisis. [Movieline]

The final episode of "Larry King Live" drew 2.24 million viewers on Thursday night (Dec. 16). That's way above its typical audience and led the cable-news race for its timeslot. [CNN]

NBC has announced audition dates and sites for its new singing competition "The Voice." They start Jan.
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Remembering Blake Edwards’s Last Bow

Peter Sellars and Blake Edwards on the set of The Pink Panther, 1964. From United Artists/Photofest. On the evening of September 30, 2010, I participated in a program at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences called “An Evening with Blake Edwards.” Blake and I were seated side by side on the stage of the Samuel Goldwyn Theater before an enthusiastic audience of approximately 1,000, to discuss his life and career. Our relationship had started a long time before that night. In 1960, Blake was one of the earliest targets of the newly formed Mirisch Company’s campaign to add the services of the industry’s most talented directors to our roster of Billy Wilder, John Sturges, William Wyler, and Robert Wise. I had met Blake in 1948, when we were both beginning our careers at the little Monogram Studios, but our careers—his as a writer-director, mine as a producer—had gone in
See full article at Vanity Fair »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites