Jazz on a Summer's Day (1959) - News Poster

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Criterion Teases 'The Deer Hunter,' 'The Big Chill,' 'It's A Wonderful Life' & More In New Year's Clue

Emerging as an annual cinephile tradition, The Criterion Collection has once again kicked off the New Year with an illustrated clue hinting at what fans of the boutique label can expect over the next 12 months. And if these hints pan out, it's going to be another strong slate of releases in 2014. Now a caveat: everything below is nothing more than educated guesses, but between the usually well-informed people at The Criterion Cast and Criterion Forum, they probably aren't far off base. So what is Criterion teasing? Well, the clues seem to be pointing toward: Michael Cimino's "The Deer Hunter"; Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life" (previously issued by Criterion on laserdisc); Howard Hawks' classic "Red River"; the landmark documentary "Jazz On A Summer's Day" (recently re-issued in a theatrical run); Lawrence Kasdan's "The Big Chill" and more. Anyway, an annotated graphic and possible titles below (via
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Chico Hamilton obituary

Highly individual American drummer, bandleader and jazz visionary who toured with Lena Horne in the 1950s

A hundred years into its evolution, jazz incorporates ethnic and European classical instruments, drum machines and DJs spinning decks. A half-century or so ago, hardware habits were more cut and dried. A jazz big band had trumpets, trombones, saxes and a rhythm section. A small band had a rhythm section, a sax and trumpet, with maybe a guitar or a vibraphone. One that featured a (very quiet) guitarist, a flute or clarinet, a cellist, and a drummer who preferred mallets to sticks seemed like a strange beast in the jazz forest.

But the groups of the American drummer Chico Hamilton, who has died aged 92, did feature such instrumentation and, contrary to the jazz orthodoxies of the 1950s, they were for a time runaway successes. Hamilton led West Coast bands in that decade that came
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movies This Week: August 16-22, 2013

                                                

The upcoming week is absolutely packed with incredible archival screenings to tell you about, and there are a couple of new releases that are worth making time for as well. First up, let's focus on the Austin Film Society, who are continuing their Johnnie To series with 35mm screenings of 1999's Running Out Of Time this weekend. In advance of the upcoming local opening of Computer Chess, Afs is also hosting Andrew Bujalski on Sunday afternoon for a Q&A at a rare 35mm screening of Funny Ha-Ha. Essential Cinema presents the outrageous pre-code Night Nurse with Barbara Stanwyck and Clark Cable in 35mm on Tuesday night while director Matt Wolf is stopping by on Wednesday for a Doc Nights premiere of his new film Teenage

The Paramount Summer Classic Film Series has a some tremendously well-programmed 35mm double features on deck this week including Spirit Of The Beehive and Pan's Labyrinth on Sunday,
See full article at Slackerwood »

Experience 'Jazz on a Summer's Day' This Week

If you lived in New York City or anywhere else along the East Coast in the 1950s, the place to go to fix your "jazz jones" was the funereal old-money resort town of Newport, Rhode Island. Started in 1954 by socialites Elaine and Louis Lorillard, the Newport Jazz Festival had grown by 1958 into a four-day event attracting 60,000 music lovers ready to snap their fingers and bob their heads to the sounds of America's top jazz artists. Fortunately, that same summer Bert Stern and a small filmmaking crew captured the essence of those performances on 35mm color film accompanied by impeccable sound recordings.

In the 1950s, Bert Stern was best known as the photographer who combined art with advertising, as seen in the recent Austin FIlm Society Doc Nights presentation: Bert Stern: Original Mad Man. The gifted artist also created TV commercials, took fashion photos for Vogue and Harper's Bazaar and
See full article at Slackerwood »

Bert Stern obituary

Photographer and film-maker who took some of the last shots of Marilyn Monroe

In the summer of 1962 Bert Stern, who has died aged 83, took more than 2,500 photographs of Marilyn Monroe over three sessions held in a Los Angeles hotel. The images captured Monroe in a sometimes pensive but mostly playful mood as she posed nude, variously covered by bedsheets, a chinchilla coat, a stripy Vera Neumann scarf and a pair of chiffon roses. Despite their air of carefree humour, the portraits are inescapably wistful because – along with George Barris's subsequent pictures of Monroe at Santa Monica beach – they are among the last photographs taken of the star. She was found dead at her home several weeks later.

The shoot was for Vogue, which had Stern on a contract that required him to fill 100 fashion pages a year and afforded him an additional 10 pages for personal projects. Stern proposed Monroe as a subject,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Marilyn Monroe Photographer Dies At 83

Marilyn Monroe Photographer Dies At 83
New York — Bert Stern, a commercial photographer best known for his images of Marilyn Monroe in what became known as "The Last Sitting," has died in New York City. He was 83.

Stern died Wednesday at his Manhattan home, said Shannah Laumeister, 43, a filmmaker who said the two were secretly married in 2009. She said the reason for keeping it secret was private.

Stern shot thousands of pictures of Monroe at the Bel Air Hotel in Los Angeles in 1962 for Vogue magazine just weeks before her drug overdose death. They included nude and semi-nude images.

"He was an enormously innovative photographer, both as a commercial photographer and a photographer of celebrities and fashion models. And one of the great people in his field," said Bruce Barnes, director of the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., which this summer is presenting Stern's only documentary film, "Jazz on a Summer's Day," made in
See full article at Huffington Post »

Sir George Shearing obituary

One of the great jazz pianists and bandleaders, he wrote Lullaby of Birdland

The pianist George Shearing, who has died aged 91 of heart failure, was the first postwar British jazz musician to move permanently to the Us and build a solid career there, effectively clearing the way for a host of other players to follow the same path. This was in 1947, at a time when Shearing and his countrymen, prevented by a Musicians' Union embargo from hearing the best American musicians in person, tended to regard these stars as supermen, wearing out their recordings, yet never imagining that it might be possible to perform alongside them in New York. However, Shearing put such negative thoughts aside and took the decision to emigrate.

His success was speedy and spectacular. By 1949, he had hit on the formula that brought him worldwide fame and colossal record sales, forming his quintet, later a sextet,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

SnagFilms, Comcast and Vimeo Expand to Portable Movie Streaming

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Documentaries, Movie News, Cinematical

Have an iPad already? If not, here is more incentive to you movie lovers: SnagFilms has just introduced a free app for the device, allowing you to stream 50 of the most popular documentary titles available through the site. And unlike Netflix Watch Instantly, which also works on the iPad, these films don't cost you anything. Some highly recommended titles offered free through the app: 'The Times of Harvey Milk,' 'Jazz on a Summer's Day,' 'Super Size Me,' 'The Future of Food' and 'Dig!'

Also coming soon is the opportunity for Comcast cable subscribers to stream movies and TV shows on their iPads (and other Apple as well as Android devices) via the Xfinity TV app, which currently appears to solely function as a guide and remote control. According to a press release, this new "play
See full article at Moviefone »

SnagFilms, Comcast and Vimeo Expand to Portable Movie Streaming

SnagFilms, Comcast and Vimeo Expand to Portable Movie Streaming
Filed under: Documentaries, Movie News, Cinematical

Have an iPad already? If not, here is more incentive to you movie lovers: SnagFilms has just introduced a free app for the device, allowing you to stream 50 of the most popular documentary titles available through the site. And unlike Netflix Watch Instantly, which also works on the iPad, these films don't cost you anything. Some highly recommended titles offered free through the app: 'The Times of Harvey Milk,' 'Jazz on a Summer's Day,' 'Super Size Me,' 'The Future of Food' and 'Dig!'

Also coming soon is the opportunity for Comcast cable subscribers to stream movies and TV shows on their iPads (and other Apple as well as Android devices) via the Xfinity TV app, which currently appears to solely function as a guide and remote control. According to a press release, this new "play
See full article at Cinematical »

Snag This: Jazz on a Summer's Day

What are your plans for the weekend? Here in the U.S., most folks are enjoying a long holiday weekend, filled with food, friends, and fireworks -- and maybe a free concert and a movie or two. On a personal note, with local temperatures soaring above 100 degrees for the past week or so, I'm staying inside and out of the weather as much as I can. And so I was pleased to find Jazz on a Summer's Day is available for free online viewing, courtesy of our friends at SnagFilms.

Directed by Aram Avakian and Bert Stern, the film documents the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival and the America's Cup sailing tournament, two events which go together like a cool drink on a hot day. Performers at the festival include Thelonius Monk, Gerry Mulligan, Anita O'Day (pictured), Dinah Washington, Chuck Berry, Louis Armstrong, and Mahalia Jackson. My knowledge of jazz is extremely limited,
See full article at Cinematical »

See also

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