7.2/10
3,612
46 user 23 critic

I'm All Right Jack (1959)

Not Rated | | Comedy | 7 March 1960 (Sweden)
A naive aristocrat in search of a career becomes caught up in the struggles between his profit-minded uncle and an aggressive labor union.

Director:

John Boulting

Writers:

Alan Hackney (novel), Frank Harvey (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Won 2 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ian Carmichael ... Stanley Windrush
Terry-Thomas ... Maj. Hitchcock
Peter Sellers ... Fred Kite / Sir John Kennaway
Richard Attenborough ... Sidney De Vere Cox
Dennis Price ... Bertram Tracepurcel (as Denis Price)
Margaret Rutherford ... Aunt Dolly
Irene Handl ... Mrs. Kite
Liz Fraser ... Cynthia Kite
Miles Malleson ... Windrush Snr.
Marne Maitland ... Mr. Mohammed
John Le Mesurier ... Waters
Raymond Huntley ... Magistrate
Victor Maddern ... Knowles
Kenneth Griffith ... Dai
Fred Griffiths Fred Griffiths ... Charlie
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Storyline

Naive Stanley Windrush (Ian Carmichael) returns from the war, his mind set on a successful career in business. Much to his own dismay, he soon finds he has to start from the bottom and work his way up, and also that the management, as well as the trade union, use him as a tool in their fight for power.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

THE BOULTING BROTHERS Annihilated the Army in "Private's Progress" - Lampooned the Lawyers in "Brothers-in-Law" - Debunked the Diplomats in "Carlton-Browne" - Gave the Varsities Vitriolic Treatment in "Lucky Jim" AND NOW With a Sharpened Sense of Satire They Badger Big Business, Are Severe on Staid Statesmen, ANd Take a Titillating Tilt at Trade Unions! See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 45 RPM version of Al Saxon's theme song had different lyrics from the movie version. See more »

Goofs

Ian Wilson appears briefly as an evangelist, walking past the camera in the crowd outside Aunt Dolly's home during the strike. He then reappears as a union man in the TV audience (he is hit in the face and a close-up shows his reaction). They could be the same character, but nothing in the film connects them. See more »

Quotes

Shop Steward: Perhaps you can explain the presence of this new man.
Major Hitchcock: New man? But he hasn't started yet.
Shop Steward: Hasn't started yet? Then what's he doing on a f-f-f fork lift truck?
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Crazy Credits

Opening quote: "Oh! Brave New World that hath such people in't" --William Shakespeare See more »

Connections

Referenced in Ladies in Black (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

I'm All Right Jack
Written by Ken Hare
Sung by Al Saxon
See more »

User Reviews

 
Great, acerbic British comedy
27 December 1999 | by RosabelSee all my reviews

The cast alone is a triumph in this movie - some of the best British character actors who ever lived are here: Terry Thomas, Miles Malleson, John Le Mesurier, all backing up Ian Carmichael as the earnest, silly-ass upper-class bumbler and Peter Sellers as Fred Kite, the Marxist shop steward. Sellers in particular is wonderful; his Fred Kite is a lower class striver who has acquired just enough education to give him an inflated idea of his own abilities, but not enough to realize the gaps and inadequacies in his views. He is a perfect realization in miniature of Taine's statement that there is nothing more dangerous than a general idea in a narrow, empty mind. He boasts to his Oxford-educated gentleman lodger about the summer course he took at the university once, reminding him in a familiar fashion about the very good marmalade and toast provided by the college, while the obviously wealthy young man politely admits that he wasn't acquainted with the public dining hall during his years there.

The plot becomes more and more complex as the movie progresses, with almost everyone turning out to be on the take. The climax comes in a free-for-all over a bag containing thousands of pounds intended to bribe Stanley into joining the sensible schemers plundering the public while paying lip service to public service and solidarity with the working class. Malcolm Muggeridge has a interesting cameo in this scene, playing himself. Most recent broadcasts of this movie have edited out the disturbing racist statements of the working class characters, but the original movie had no sentimental soft spot for anyone, workers or bosses.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 March 1960 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

I'm All Right Jack See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Black and White (archive footage)| Black and White

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

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