The Fugitive Kind (1960) - News Poster

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Something Wild (1961)

Something Wild

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 850

1961 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 113 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date January 17, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Carroll Baker, Ralph Meeker, Mildred Dunnock, Jean Stapleton, Martin Kosleck, Charles Watts, Clifton James, Doris Roberts, Anita Cooper, Tanya Lopert.

Cinematography: Eugen Schüfftan

Film Editor: Carl Lerner

Original Music: Aaron Copland

Written by Jack Garfein and Alex Karmel from his novel Mary Ann

Produced by George Justin

Directed by Jack Garfein

After writing up an earlier Mod disc release of the 1961 movie Something Wild, I received a brief but welcome email note from its director:

“Dear Glenn Erickson,

Thank you for your profound appreciation of Something Wild.

If possible, I would appreciate if you could send

me a copy of your review by email.

Sincerely yours, Jack Garfein

Somewhere back East (or in London), the Actors Studio legend Jack Garfein had found favor with the review. Although
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Film Review: ‘By Sidney Lumet’

Film Review: ‘By Sidney Lumet’
In “By Sidney Lumet,” a documentary portrait of the late director who was one of the defining filmmakers of the ’70s — but whose ability to charge a scene with dark moral turbulence and excitement was right there, from his first feature, “12 Angry Men,” in 1957 — Lumet tells an extraordinarily candid story about an event that shaped and changed his entire worldview. He was a young man in the military, in Calcutta, when he saw that a group of his fellow soldiers were inside a train compartment sexually abusing a young girl. “Do I do anything about this?” he thought. He knew the answer was yes, that he should try to stop this hideous crime, but he lacked the courage to do so. Instead of acting, he simply let it happen.

To any Lumet watcher, it’s obvious that the story fuses with themes that run through his work: the preoccupation with corruption,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Poster of the Week: Anna Magnani in Movie Posters

Above: French grande for Volcano (William Dierterle, Italy, 1950). A few weeks ago, I featured the posters of Anna Karina; now it’s the turn of that other legendary Anna... La Magnani or “La Lupa”, the she-wolf, as she was known. Magnani is currently being fêted at Lincoln Center in an all-celluloid retrospective showing 24 of her films that runs through June 1 before traveling to Chicago, San Francisco, Houston and Columbus.Magnani became a star with her powerhouse performance in Rossellini’s Rome, Open City in 1945, and the indelible image of her chasing down the Nazi soldiers who have taken her resistance-hero husband, is one that seems to have informed her persona throughout her career. No sex-kitten, Magnani was the personification of the great actress, and in her posters she is almost always emoting. She is rarely shown smiling (look at her scowling at Ingrid Bergman—in real life she had good
See full article at MUBI »

The Past, Present, and Future of Real-Time Films Part Two

Sidney And The Sixties: Real-time 1957-1966

Throughout the 1950s, Hollywood’s relationship with television was fraught: TV was a hated rival but also a source of cheap talent and material, as in the case of the small-scale Marty (1955), which won the Best Picture Oscar. These contradictions were well represented by the apparently “televisual” 12 Angry Men (1957), which began life as a teleplay concerning a jury with a lone holdout who must, and eventually does, convince his fellow jurors of the defendant’s innocence. Its writer, Reginald Rose, persuaded one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, Henry Fonda, to become a first-time producer of the film version. Fonda and Rose took basement-low salaries in favor of future points, and hired a TV director, Sidney Lumet, for next to nothing because Lumet wanted a first feature credit. Technically, there’s an opening bit on the courtroom steps that keeps this from being a true real-time film,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Breakfast At Tiffany's producer Richard Shepherd dies, aged 86

Breakfast At Tiffany's producer Richard Shepherd dies, aged 86
Film producer Richard Shepherd has died, aged 86.

The filmmaker worked in the movie business for six decades, producing many films including 1961's Breakfast At Tiffany's, starring Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard.

His other well-known films include 1976's Robin and Marian starring Hepburn and Sean Connery, Marlon Brando's The Fugitive Kind and 1959's The Hanging Tree with Gary Cooper.

He also set up the Artists Agency, representing many top stars including Marilyn Monroe, Rex Harrison, Peter Sellers and Richard Harris.

Shepherd was credited with rescuing the song 'Moon River' for Breakfast At Tiffany's, after executive Marty Rackin wanted to remove it from the film.

He is survived by his wife and four children from his two marriages, including Miami Vice producer Scott Shepherd.

Watch Audrey Hepburn sing 'Moon River' in Breakfast At Tiffany's below:
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'Breakfast At Tiffany's' producer Richard Shepherd dies at 86

Washington, Jan. 16: Richard Shepherd, who is known for classic films 'Breakfast At Tiffany's' and 'The Fugitive Kind', has dies after a long illness. He was 86.

He also served as head of production at MGM and Warner Bros. and then founded the Artists Agency, the Hollywood Reporter reported.

During his six-decade career in the entertainment industry, he also produced films like 'The Hanging Tree', 'The Hunger', 'The Exorcist', 'Fame', 'Robin and Marian' and 'Love in a Goldfish Bowl'. (Ani)
See full article at RealBollywood »

Producer Richard Shepherd, Founder of Artists Agency, Dies at 86

Studio exec and producer Richard Shepherd died Tuesday night at his Los Angeles home, his wife Patricia told Variety. He was 86.

Shepherd, who was suffering from a long-time illness, produced “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and headed production at MGM and Warner Bros. before founding the Artists Agency during his 60-plus-year career.

Shepherd also produced 1959’s “The Hanging Tree,” starring Gary Cooper; 1960’s “The Fugitive Kind” with Marlon Brando and 1976’s “Robin and Marian,” starring Audrey Hepburn, whom he convinced to return to acting after a decade-long absence. He worked with longtime partner Martin Jurow on most of his projects, including “Love in a Goldfish Bowl” and “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”

He was hired by McA owner Lew Wasserman right after graduating from Stanford in the 1940s. Shepherd would later found his own agency, The Artists Agency, and rep the likes of Marilyn Monroe and Richard Harris. He spent two decades there,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Win: Classic 7 DVD Movie Bundle

Fans of Robert Redford, Marlon Brando, John Wayne and Jason Robards rejoice! Altitude Films are releasing Seven classic films between May 27th and June 10th and to celebrate we are offering you the chance to win them all.

Two lucky winners will each receive a bundle of classic movies including a copy of The Fugitive Kind, The Hot Rock, Arabian Nights, Desiree, The Story of GI Joe, The St Valentines Massacre and McLintock!

Here’s the rundown on the films included in this fantastic classic bundle…

Arabian Nights (1942)

Filmed in glorious Technicolor and nominated for four Academy Awards®, Arabian Nights is an action-packed adventure classic.

Starring Jon Hall and Maria Montez, Arabian Nights is a grand tale of intrigue and romance. Haroun-Al-Raschid, the Caliph of Bagdad and his half-brother Kamar are in an epic battle, competing for the throne and for the affections of a beautiful dancer, Scheherazade.

Pre-order your copy now here.

Win The Fugitive Kind Starring Marlon Brando on DVD

To celebrate the release of the Marlon Brando classic The Fugitive Kind on May 27th, we are offering you the chance to win one of three copies of the DVD.

Oscar® Winners Marlon Brando (On the Waterfront), Anna Magnani (The Rose Tattoo), Joanne Woodward (The Three Faces of Eve) and Maureen Stapleton (Reds) lead the stellar cast of this Southern gothic “sizzler” (Los Angeles Times) based on the Tennessee Williams play Orpheus Descending.

Thanks to “brilliant” (The Film Daily) performances, The Fugitive Kind “sets one’s senses to throbbing” (The New York Times).

Valentine “Snakeskin” Xavier (Brando) is a handsome drifter with a guitar…and a past. Taking a job as a stored clerk in Two Rivers, Mississippi, his strong and silent demeanor attracts not only the local party girl (Woodward), but also the shopkeeper’s exotic wife (Magnani).

Soon, this explosive love triangle will ignite a powder keg of
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Reader Spotlight: Andy in Boston

It's Andy !It's "Reader Appreciation Month". So we're talking to a reader a day. Get to know The Film Experience community. Today we're talking to Andy Hoglund a '20something living that rock star life'. He writes for The Inclusive

What's your first movie memory?

Andy: When I was 4 my dad took me to a screening of Pinocchio. I know I probably had watched movies before then (Mary Poppins on VHS), but this is my first legitimate memory of going to the movies. Sitting in a darkened theater, fully immersed -- there’s really nothing comparable to it, I’d say.

I was infatuated with the Universal Horror monster movies. Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolf Man. I still remember – at 4 – watching AMC’s 2pm Monster movie every Saturday. It is rumored that I have seen Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man over 50 times. I actually once sent Vincent Price a letter when
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Lion In Winter Producer Martin Poll Dead

Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn, The Lion in Winter Martin Poll, best known for producing Anthony Harvey's 1968 Best Picture Oscar nominee The Lion in Winter, starring Katharine Hepburn as Eleanor of Aquitaine and Peter O'Toole as King Henry II, died of "natural causes" on April 14 according to various online sources. Poll was 89. An Avco Embassy release, The Lion in Winter was considered the favorite for the Best Picture and Best Director Oscars. The film had won the Best Film Award from the New York Film Critics Circle, while Harvey was the year's Directors Guild Award winner. However, Carol Reed's Columbia-distributed musical Oliver! turned out to be the winner in both categories. (Curiously, the previous year another Embassy release, Mike Nichols' The Graduate, unexpectedly lost the Best Picture Oscar to Norman Jewison's United Artists-distributed In the Heat of the Night. But at least Nichols came out victorious.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

R.I.P. Martin Poll

Veteran movie and TV producer Martin Poll died between Friday night and early Saturday morning of natural causes at a care facility on the Upper Westside in New York City. He was 89. Poll was nominated for an Academy Award as producer for Best Picture of 1968 for The Lion In Winter, which won three Oscars — Best Actress Katharine Hepburn (tied with Barbra Streisand for Funny Girl), Best Original Score for John Barry and Best Adapted Screenplay for James Goldman — out of seven nominations. He began his career in Europe where he served as a co-producer on feature films and produced more than three dozen half-hour episodes of the classic Flash Gordon TV series in Germany and France for international release. After moving to New York City, Poll bought and reopened the famed Biograph Studio and rechristened it Gold Medal Studios. Productions during his time at Gold Medal included Elia Kazan’s A Face In The Crowd,
See full article at Deadline TV »

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

It has been a year since Sidney Lumet passed away on April 9, 2011. Here is our retrospective on the legendary filmmaker to honor his memory. Originally published April 15, 2011.

Almost a week after the fact, we, like everyone that loves film, are still mourning the passing of the great American master Sidney Lumet, one of the true titans of cinema.

Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

His directing career stretched well over 50 years,
See full article at The Playlist »

Cliff Robertson, 1923 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Cliff Robertson, who starred as John F Kennedy in a 1963 World War II drama and later won an Academy Award for his portrayal of a mentally disabled bakery janitor in the movie Charly, died Saturday, one day after his 88th birthday," reports Dennis McLellan in the Los Angeles Times, adding that Robertson " also played a real-life role as the whistle-blower in the check-forging scandal of then-Columbia Pictures President David Begelman that rocked Hollywood in the late 1970s… In a more than 50-year career in films, Robertson appeared in some 60 movies, including Pt 109, My Six Loves, Sunday in New York, The Best Man, The Devil's Brigade, Three Days of the Condor, Obsession and Star 80. More recently, he played Uncle Ben Parker in the Spider-Man films."

In Charly, "he played a lovable bakery worker with the Iq of a 5-year-old whose intelligence is raised to genius level by an experiment,
See full article at MUBI »

Marlon Brando Movie Schedule on TCM: A Streetcar Named Desire, The Formula

Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire Marlon Brando Movies on TCM: The Wild One, Julius Caesar, The Chase Schedule (Et) and synopses from the TCM website: 6:00 Am The Fugitive Kind (1960) A drifter ignites passions among the women of a Mississippi town. Dir: Sidney Lumet. Cast: Marlon Brando, Anna Magnani, Joanne Woodward. Bw-121 mins, Letterbox Format 8:15 Am Julius Caesar (1953) An all-star adaptation of Shakespeare's classic about Julius Caesar's assassination and its aftermath. Dir: Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Cast: John Doucette, George Macready, Michael Pate. Bw-121 mins. 10:30 Am The Chase (1966) A convict's escape ignites passions in his hometown. Dir: Arthur Penn. Cast: Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford. C-133 mins, Letterbox Format 1:00 Pm Reflections In A Golden Eye (1967) A military officer becomes obsessed with an enlisted man. Dir: John Huston. Cast: Elizabeth Taylor, Marlon Brando, Brian Keith. C-109 mins, Letterbox Format 3:00 Pm Teahouse Of The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Marlon Brando on TCM: The Wild One, Julius Caesar, The Chase

Marlon Brando is the first star in the 2011 edition of Turner Classic Movies' annual Summer Under the Stars series, which kicks off August 1. [Marlon Brando Movie Schedule.] Unfortunately, none of the 11 scheduled Marlon Brando movies is a TCM premiere; in fact, nearly all of them were shown on Brando Day three years ago. In other words, don't expect The Island of Dr. Moreau, Morituri, A Bedtime Story, Burn!, A Dry White Season, or The Appaloosa. And certainly no frolicking with Maria Schneider in Last Tango in Paris. That's too bad. But then again, those who would like to check out Julius Caesar for the 118th time will be able to do so. And perhaps they won't be sorry, as this great-looking Joseph L. Mankiewicz effort remains one of the best-liked film adaptations of a Shakespeare play. Those not into Shakespeare can take a look at The Fugitive Kind and A Streetcar Named Desire, both from Tennessee Williams' plays.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sidney Lumet, 1924 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Sidney Lumet, a director who preferred the streets of New York to the back lots of Hollywood and whose stories of conscience — 12 Angry Men, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, The Verdict, Network — became modern American film classics, died Saturday morning at his home in Manhattan. He was 86." Robert Berkvist in the New York Times: "'While the goal of all movies is to entertain,' Mr Lumet once wrote, 'the kind of film in which I believe goes one step further. It compels the spectator to examine one facet or another of his own conscience. It stimulates thought and sets the mental juices flowing.' Social issues set his own mental juices flowing, and his best films not only probed the consequences of prejudice, corruption and betrayal but also celebrated individual acts of courage."

"Nearly all the characters in Lumet's gallery are driven by obsessions or passions that range from the pursuit of justice,
See full article at MUBI »

Five of Sidney Lumet's Lesser-Known Films Worth Seeking Out

  • IFC
Five of Sidney Lumet's Lesser-Known Films Worth Seeking Out
Only days ago "The Deadly Affair" arrived at my doorstep, yet another of Sidney Lumet's films I had never seen before since having been born two-thirds of the way into the director's legendary career, it's always been a game of catch-up. Then again, it was that way for most in his field, even if they were contemporaries.

After passing away far too soon at the age of 86, Lumet leaves behind a half-century-long career that will no doubt be scrutinized for being inconsistent, a richly ironic assessment given that in person and on film, he was known as a straight shooter, and perhaps one of the only filmmakers who could say their final film ("Before the Devil Knows You're Dead") was as vital and strong as their first ("12 Angry Men"). However, that certainly isn't the only reason why Lumet was a rarity.

In a world full of auteurs, Lumet was a collaborator,
See full article at IFC »

Remembering Sidney (1924-2011)

After establishing himself as a TV director, “12 Angry Men” marked Lumet’s feature debut… “12 Angry Men”? Really??? An AFI 100 ranked film, an Oscar nomination, on his first shot?

Was Lumet that good or that lucky? Really, he was that good, following up that effort with three other Oscar nominated efforts, the Pacino-led “Dog Day Afternoon” (1975), double-digit nominated “Network” (1976) and Paul Newman’s “The Verdict” (1982). While all these films are still relevant, “Network” was a tour de force. Unfortunately, so were a few other all-time classics released that same year, “All the President’s Men,” “Taxi Driver” and Sylvester Stallone’s king-hitting “Rocky.”

Just as significant to Lumet’s career are his non-Oscar’ed films that hold up against the work of any of his contemporaries, including adaptations of Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” Arthur Miller’s “A View from the Bridge,” and Tennessee Williams’ “The Fugitive Kind
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

Remembering Sidney (1924-2011)

After establishing himself as a TV director, “12 Angry Men” marked Lumet’s feature debut… “12 Angry Men”? Really??? An AFI 100 ranked film, an Oscar nomination, on his first shot?

Was Lumet that good or that lucky? Really, he was that good, following up that effort with three other Oscar nominated efforts, the Pacino-led “Dog Day Afternoon” (1975), double-digit nominated “Network” (1976) and Paul Newman’s “The Verdict” (1982). While all these films are still relevant, “Network” was a tour de force. Unfortunately, so were a few other all-time classics released that same year, “All the President’s Men,” “Taxi Driver” and Sylvester Stallone’s king-hitting “Rocky.”

Just as significant to Lumet’s career are his non-Oscar’ed films that hold up against the work of any of his contemporaries, including adaptations of Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” Arthur Miller’s “A View from the Bridge,” and Tennessee Williams’ “The Fugitive Kind
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »
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