6.9/10
149
3 user 1 critic

The Carmelites (1960)

Le dialogue des Carmélites (original title)
This is about the execution of 21 carmelite nuns in the latter stages of the terror during the French Revolution.

Directors:

Philippe Agostini, Raymond Leopold Bruckberger (as R.L. Bruckberger)

Writers:

Gertrud von Le Fort (novel), Georges Bernanos (play) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
2 wins. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Eva (1962)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A raw Welsh novelist in Venice is humiliated by a money-loving Frenchwoman who erotically ensnares him.

Director: Joseph Losey
Stars: Jeanne Moreau, Stanley Baker, Virna Lisi
Dialogues of the Carmelites (TV Movie 1984)
Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

The timid Blanche de la Force decides to retreat from the world and enter a Carmelite convent. The Mother Superior informs her that the Carmelite order is not a refuge: it is the duty of ... See full synopsis »

Director: Henry Prokop
Stars: Heather Begg, Isobel Buchanan, Geoffrey Chard
Dialogues des Carmélites (TV Movie 1999)
Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9.3/10 X  

During the French Revolution's Reign of Terror, a small band of Carmelite nuns struggle to hold on to their faith amid the growing chaos and the ever-present threat of the guillotine. Some ... See full summary »

Director: Don Kent
Stars: Anne-Sophie Schmidt, Valérie Millot, Nadine Denize
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

A wealthy and bored woman is witness of a murder in affection and meets another witness. She asks him about the history of the victim and falls in love with him.

Director: Peter Brook
Stars: Jeanne Moreau, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Pascale de Boysson
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeanne Moreau ... Mère Marie de l'Incarnation
Alida Valli ... Mère Thérèse de Saint-Augustin
Madeleine Renaud ... La première prieure
Pascale Audret ... Soeur Blanche de l'Agonie du Christ (Blanche de la Force)
Pierre Brasseur ... Le commissaire de la République
Jean-Louis Barrault ... Le mime
Anne Doat ... Soeur Constance de Saint-Denis (Marie-Geneviève Meunier)
Georges Wilson ... L'aumônier du Carmel
Pierre Bertin Pierre Bertin ... Le marquis de la Force
Claude Laydu ... Le Chevalier de la Force
Judith Magre ... Rose Ducor
Simone Angèle Simone Angèle ... Soeur Agnès (as Simone Angele)
Pascale de Boysson Pascale de Boysson ... Soeur Cécile
Jacqueline Dane Jacqueline Dane ... Soeur Gabrielle
Paula Dehelly Paula Dehelly ... Soeur Catherine
Edit

Storyline

This is about the execution of 21 carmelite nuns in the latter stages of the terror during the French Revolution.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | History

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

France | Italy

Language:

French

Release Date:

1 June 1960 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

The Carmelites See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Version of Dialogues des Carmélites (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

La Marseillaise
(uncredited)
Written by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
La Terreur: a gruesome indictment
22 August 2002 | by jgcorreaSee all my reviews

Cinema has not been insensitive to Georges Bernanos , who ranks alongside with other great Catholic 20th-century writers, most notably Graham Greene, André Gide and Paul Claudel. One of Robert Bresson's masterpieces, 'Mouchette,' was adapted from Bernanos. 'Sous le soleil de Satan' turned out to be another interesting adaptation . But his most famous play is this Dialogue, a period piece which is an eloquent libel against repression on any cult freedom, no matter what kind of creed. Though the picture cannot be compared to the magnificent opera that composer Francis Poulenc extracted from the same text, it does record, with sincerity, the tragic episode when nuns, during the Terror regime, in the French Revolution, willingly became martyrs in the name of Christian faith and freedom of belief. Maybe revolutions cannot help being gruesome, but must they suspend belief beyond the rescue of the soul(s)?


11 of 14 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed