Ex-gunfighter Johnny Ringo is now the sheriff of a small Western town, and attempts to keep the peace with the aid of his deputy, Cully, and his girl, Laura Thomas.

Creator:

Aaron Spelling
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Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
1960   1959  

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Don Durant ...  Johnny Ringo 38 episodes, 1959-1960
Mark Goddard ...  Cully 38 episodes, 1959-1960
Karen Sharpe ...  Laura Thomas 18 episodes, 1959-1960
Terence de Marney ...  Case Thomas 17 episodes, 1959-1960
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Storyline

Ex-gunfighter Johnny Ringo is now the sheriff of a small Western town, and attempts to keep the peace with the aid of his deputy, Cully, and his girl, Laura Thomas.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Western

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 October 1959 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Westerners See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Four Star Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(38 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Originated as an installment of the TV anthology series Zane Grey Theater (1956) telecast on March 5, 1959, also starring Don Durant: Zane Grey Theater: The Loner (1959). See more »

Alternate Versions

In 1966, Four Star Productions syndicated four of its half-hour Western series under the title of "The Westerners." They were "The Black Saddle," "Johnny Ringo," "Law of the Plainsman," and "The Westerner." The series had a new opening credits sequence featuring Michael Ansara, Peter Breck, Don Durant, and Brian Keith. Keenan Wynn appeared in new opening and closing host segments. The original closing credits were retained. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Film School 101: How to Start a Dynasty
12 September 2013 | by A_Different_DrummerSee all my reviews

Lets be upfront, rated 5 out of 10 because in an age when westerns were a dime a dozen, and you are competing for eyeballs with the likes of Steven McQueen and Richard Boone, this product was nothing more and nothing less than average. In those days (boy do I sound old) every western had a gimmick (except perhaps Gunsmoke, where the gimmick was that there was no gimmick, just tedious dialog.) Boone had his hidden derringer, McQueen had his saw-off with trick holster, Hugh Obrien had his Buntline, etc) here the character had really odd pistol which carried an extra shell. (Trivia note -- the writers based this on a real gun designed in France. Where else?) Invariably, just as Wyatt Earp would end up in a gunfight where the bad guy was too far away to fire back, and Palladin would end up fining his derringer when the bad guy looked the other way, Ringo would face an enemy who believed he was out of ammo (counting shots in a 50s western? wow) and surprise the rogue. The real story however is that this series was part of a "package" that a young producer named Aaron Spelling sold to TV, part of a set of three as I recall. He made them on the cheap (the star of Ringo had to sing his own theme song) and he essentially started a dynasty. So if you are in Business School, the rating is a 10.


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