7.9/10
907
39 user 8 critic

One Step Beyond 

Produced at the same time as the more well-known Twilight Zone, this series fed the nation's growing interest in paranormal suspense in a different way. Rather than creating fictional ... See full summary »

Creator:

Reviews
Popularity
3,168 ( 426)

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
ON DISC

Episodes

Seasons


Years



3   2   1  
1961   1960   1959  

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Thriller (1960–1962)
Crime | Drama | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Anthology series hosted by Boris Karloff that originally told ordinary tales of crime and mystery, but later became a showcase for gothic horror stories, many of which were based on works ... See full summary »

Stars: Boris Karloff, Richard Peel, Henry Daniell
The Veil (TV Mini-Series 1958)
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

An anthology of horror stories hosted by actor Boris Karloff.

Stars: Boris Karloff, Denise Alexander, Tod Andrews
Night Gallery (1969–1973)
Drama | Fantasy | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Rod Serling presents tales of horror illustrated in various paintings.

Stars: Rod Serling, Larry Watson, Joanna Pettet
The Outer Limits (1963–1965)
Fantasy | Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

An anthology series of insightful science fiction tales.

Stars: Bob Johnson, Ben Wright, William Douglas
Drama | Mystery | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

In the 21st century, Earth begins the colonization of Mars. However, things do not go as planned, at first due to the hostile Martian natives and later because of the self-destructive Earthmen.

Stars: Rock Hudson, Gayle Hunnicutt, Bernie Casey
Monsters (1988–1990)
Comedy | Drama | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A horror anthology about a family of monsters watching a different horror story every week on their TV. Each tale is separate, often cautionary with occasional dark humor and irony and features various deadly creatures.

Stars: John Bolger, Pamela Dean Kelly, Michael J. Anderson
Horror | Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.6/10 X  

A newspaper reporter investigates strange supernatural occurrences in Chicago.

Stars: Darren McGavin, Simon Oakland, Jack Grinnage
F Troop (1965–1967)
Comedy | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The misadventures of the staff and neighbors of a remote U.S. Army outpost in the Wild West.

Stars: Forrest Tucker, Larry Storch, Ken Berry
Gargoyles (TV Movie 1972)
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

An anthropologist/paleontologist and his daughter, while traveling through the southwestern US, stumble upon a colony of living, breathing gargoyles.

Director: Bill Norton
Stars: Cornel Wilde, Jennifer Salt, Grayson Hall
The Ray Bradbury Theater (1985–1992)
Drama | Fantasy | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A Canadian-produced anthology series scripted by famed science-fiction author Ray Bradbury. Many of the teleplays were based upon Bradbury's novels and short stories.

Stars: Ray Bradbury, Frank Whitten, Desmond Kelly
Love, American Style (1969–1974)
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

An anthology comedy series featuring a line up of different celebrity guest stars appearing in anywhere from one, two, three, and four short stories or vignettes within an hour about versions of love and romance.

Stars: Stuart Margolin, Barbara Minkus, William Callaway
The Next Step Beyond (TV Series 1978)
Drama | Mystery | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

An updated version of the popular series from the late 50's and early 60's, One Step Beyond. Still hosted by John Newland, this series looked for supposedly real stories of hauntings, ... See full summary »

Stars: John Newland, Craig Littler, Henry Brandon
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
Edit

Storyline

Produced at the same time as the more well-known Twilight Zone, this series fed the nation's growing interest in paranormal suspense in a different way. Rather than creating fictional stories with supernatural twists and turns, this program sought out 'real' stories of the supernatural, including ghosts, disappearances, monsters, etc., and re-creating them for each episode. No solutions to these mysteries were ever found, and viewers could only scratch their heads and wonder, "what if it's real?" Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

"What you are about to see is a matter of human record. Explain it: we cannot. Disprove it: we cannot. We simply invite you to explore with us the amazing world of the Unknown ... to take that One Step ... Beyond."


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 January 1959 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alcoa Presents  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$40,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(96 episodes)

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Through an oversight, Worldvision didn't renew the copyrights on most episodes of this series when they expired in the late 1980s, and they thus fell into the public domain. Since royalties didn't have to be paid to Worldvision, the result was a revival of the series on UHF and cable television and on VHS and DVD. Since well-worn syndication prints were and are typically used by those media, the results often leave something to be desired, quality-wise. See more »

Quotes

John Newland: [episode introduction] What you are about to see is a matter of human record. Explain it: we cannot. Disprove it: we cannot. We simply invite you to explore with us the amazing world of the Unknown... to take that One Step... Beyond.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Beyond Titanic (1998) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Chilling Television
7 September 2002 | by See all my reviews

There have been so many comparisons between this show and The Twilight Zone I may as well add my own two cents on the subject. These two shows were both hosted and created by men who had been active in live television. Rod Serling had been one of the top writers of the live so-called "golden age" of TV drama in the fifties, while John Newland had been a prominent actor on the small screen during the same period. Alcoa Presents (rerun as One Step Step Beyond, and best-remembered by this title) actually preceded the Zone by half a second, and ran for less than three full years. TZ has a bigger cult audience, but OSB (as I prefer to call it), has its admirers, of which I am one.

The Zone was liberal in tone, dark and moody in its photographic style. Its set designs, particularly its street scenes, were reminiscent of film noir. While the Zone's stories were all fiction, many adapted from short stories, OSB's producers claimed that its stories were all based on fact. The different styles of the two shows can be seen in the way their hosts presented themselves. Serling was dark, intense, urban and verbose. Newland was light, mild, laconic and somewhat effete. While Serling seemed like the sort of guy you'd see at the ballpark or at the fights, Newland was the kind of guy one might expect to turn up at the opera. Serling came off as very American in all respects, while Newland could almost pass as British.

OSB presented each episode as if it were the truth, only slightly dramatized. There was nothing on the surface to suggest that the show was in any way about the supernatural or ESP. The sets were unimaginative, prosaic, and often seemed flooded with light; as the overall visual style of the series was not that different from a commercial,--or an episode of the Loretta Young Show. What made the shows creepy were the acting, which was often excellent, and Harry Lubin's eerie, otherworldly music, which kicked in whenever something weird was happening. The actors tended to react to the strange goings-on realistically,--as it they were choking to death, had just seen a ghost, talked to a dead person or had witnessed a murder that had happened twenty years earlier--and the "startle reactions" on the faces of the players, plus Lubin's beyond the grave music, could send chills down one spine. This was a million miles from the often sentimental and didactic Zone, which seldom went for straight horror, straight sci-fi or straight anything unless there was a "meaning" (i.e. a point, a lesson), while the only lesson one learned from OSB was that "such things exist, such things happen". Chilling television, this was, and story-telling with a vengeance. "You want meaning?", Newland seemed to ask the viewer after each episode, "Go find it for yourself. My job is to give you the facts".


28 of 29 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 39 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page