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Vertigo (1958)

Trailer
2:14 | Trailer
A former police detective juggles wrestling with his personal demons and becoming obsessed with a hauntingly beautiful woman.

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writers:

Alec Coppel (screenplay by), Samuel A. Taylor (screenplay by) (as Samuel Taylor) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
1,193 ( 54)
Top Rated Movies #91 | Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
James Stewart ... John 'Scottie' Ferguson
Kim Novak ... Madeleine Elster / Judy Barton
Barbara Bel Geddes ... Midge Wood
Tom Helmore ... Gavin Elster
Henry Jones ... Coroner
Raymond Bailey ... Scottie's Doctor
Ellen Corby ... Manager of McKittrick Hotel
Konstantin Shayne ... Pop Leibel
Lee Patrick ... Car Owner Mistaken for Madeleine
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Storyline

John "Scottie" Ferguson is a retired San Francisco police detective who suffers from acrophobia, and Madeleine is the lady who leads him to high places. A wealthy shipbuilder who is an acquaintance from college days approaches Scottie and asks him to follow his beautiful wife, Madeleine. He fears she is going insane, maybe even contemplating suicide, as he believes she has been possessed by a dead ancestor who committed suicide. Scottie is skeptical, but agrees to the assignment after he sees the beautiful Madeleine. Written by filmfactsman

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Mystery Revised... A Master Remembered! (1996 Restored Film Premiere) See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 May 1958 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Darkling I Listen See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,479,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$252,880, 18 March 2018

Gross USA:

$7,705,225

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$7,796,389
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1996 restored)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)| DTS (70 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.50 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The opening title sequence designed by Saul Bass makes this the first movie to use computer graphics. See more »

Goofs

Scottie is standing on the top of a step stool when he faints and falls. In the next scene, Midge catches him after he falls only about one foot. Based on the height of the stool, he should have fallen at least three feet. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Officer on rooftop: Give me your hand. Give me your hand.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening Paramount logo is in black and white while the rest of the film, including the closing Paramount logo, is in Technicolor. See more »

Alternate Versions

An entirely new audio track was created for the 1996 re-release using modern recordings and mixed in DTS surround sound. New elements not present in the original film were added and several important details (such as creaky roof tiles) were omitted. This was the version used on all subsequent theatrical re-issues, home video releases and television broadcasts until 2012, when Universal made a DTS soundtrack retaining the original sound effects. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Vanilla Sky (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Symphony No. 34 in C K. 338, 2nd Movement, Andante di Molto (piu tosto allegretto)
(uncredited)
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Played as 'cue 10B' on a record in the psychiatric ward
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
Let there be color!
26 January 2005 | by slabihoudSee all my reviews

Since there are already so many real good comments on this film I want to focus on only one aspect.

Vertigo is a great example for what color films really can look like! Not only do I want to praise the quality of the Technicolor dye transfer prints but also more the way Hitchcock used color to create moods. Many directors used light to create moods in black and white movies but only very few ever got so far as to use the much greater palette of colors for the same purpose. One wonders why. Some directors decide for an overall color look, which is often done in the lab, but not on the set.

Vertigo is full of scenes where the colors have been saturated or changed to create a special feeling. Hitchcock even went so far as to openly dye some frames is bright unnatural colors. He played around with colors in all his color films but never as much as in this one. Think for example on James Stewart's nightmare in the middle of the film. There are frames dyed purple and green; the cemetery scenes are red, inserted to the rhythm of the music with normal frames. Kim Novak is often bathed in colored light like in the famous hotel room scene, where she appears like a ghost with all the green light around her.

The shading is also important. In the scene in the bookshop we hear a dark and sad story while at the same time the light dimes down to simulate dusk. In the scene where Judy remembers the real events in the bell tower it starts with an outdoor scene, which we have already seen but it is now much darker than the first time. In the sequence where Stewart follows Novak to the cemetery everything feels unnatural since every scene glows through the use of a filter that creates a blur.

The non-color of Kim Novak's dress as Madeleine is also a very important aspect in the film. She has to color her hair to become Madeleine again at the end of the picture.

The way color is used in this film gives it this dreamlike quality that allows endless interpretations. A true masterpiece!


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