6.7/10
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Tiger of Bengal (1959)

Der Tiger von Eschnapur (original title)
In Eschnapur, a local Maharajah and a German architect fall in-love with the same temple dancer.

Director:

Fritz Lang

Writers:

Werner Jörg Lüddecke (screenplay), Thea von Harbou (novel) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Debra Paget ... Seetha the Sheeva dancer
Paul Hubschmid ... Harald Berger / Henri Mercier in French version
Walther Reyer ... Maharadjaj Chandra
Claus Holm ... Dr. Walter Rhode
Sabine Bethmann ... Irene Rhode
Luciana Paluzzi ... Bharani - Seetha's servant
René Deltgen ... Prince Ramigani
Valéry Inkijinoff ... Yama (as Inkijinoff)
Jochen Brockmann ... Padhu - Ramigani's ally
Richard Lauffen Richard Lauffen ... Bhowana
Jochen Blume ... Asagara - the Engineer
Helmut Hildebrand Helmut Hildebrand ... Ramigani's servant
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Storyline

An architect travels to the remote city of Eschnapur to oversee some work being done at the bequest of the local Maharajah. Along the way the architect meets and falls in love with a beautiful temple-dancer. The Maharajah also loves this dancer and plans to marry her despite fierce opposition from factions within his own court. The dancer responds to the architect's advances and they flee from Eschnapur but are captured by the Maharajah's soldiers. To save the architect's life, the dancer agrees to marry the Maharajah. This sparks a revolt which is eventually put down. The sadder but wiser Maharajah then allows the architect and the dancer to leave his domain. Written by RC

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Der deutsche Millionen-Film!


Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the french-dubbed version, known as "Le tigre du Bengale" - released in July 1959, Debra Paget is dubbed by Michèle Montel, Paul Hubschmid by Michel Roux, Walter Reyer by Jean-Claude Michel, Claus Holm by Daniel Clérice, Sabine Bethmann by Nadine Alari, Rene Deltgen by Yves Brainville and Jochen Blume by Roger Rudel. See more »

Connections

Edited into Fritz Lang: Circle of Destiny (2004) See more »

User Reviews

 
Stirring thrill from yesteryear
11 October 2002 | by kineticaSee all my reviews

This is a Lush production. The costumes and extravagance of the exterior sets for the various parades is intoxicating. This film captures the allure that India held for many decades. The story is clear cut, and there are many simplistic plot motivations. The film is the premier example of the Cliffhanger style, as the story unfolds from peril to peril. While some effects are of grade A cheese (a poor tiger in the beginning) The dance scenes Really do open the eyes. Of Star Trek note... the second dance scene MUST have been the inspiration for Vina, the Orion Slave dancer of "The Cage" fame... many of the same exotica is there. Fritz Lang was indeed a crafty teller of tales.


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Details

Country:

West Germany | France | Italy

Language:

German

Release Date:

October 1960 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Fritz Lang's The Tiger of Eschnapur See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

DEM4,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,401, 29 September 2019

Gross USA:

$4,673

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,673
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)| Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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