7.4/10
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81 user 27 critic

Separate Tables (1958)

Approved | | Drama, Romance | 11 February 1959 (France)
Trailer
2:40 | Trailer
The stories of several people are told as they stay at a seaside hotel in Bournemouth which features dining at "Separate Tables."

Director:

Delbert Mann

Writers:

Terence Rattigan (screenplay), John Gay (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Won 2 Oscars. Another 5 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Deborah Kerr ... Sibyl Railton-Bell
Rita Hayworth ... Ann Shankland
David Niven ... Major Angus Pollock
Wendy Hiller ... Pat Cooper
Burt Lancaster ... John Malcolm
Gladys Cooper ... Mrs. Railton-Bell
Cathleen Nesbitt ... Lady Matheson
Felix Aylmer ... Mr. Fowler
Rod Taylor ... Charles
Audrey Dalton ... Jean
May Hallatt ... Miss Meacham
Priscilla Morgan ... Doreen
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Storyline

It's the off-season at the lonely Beauregard Hotel in Bournemoth, and only the long-term tenants are still in residence. Life at the Beauregard is stirred up, however, when the beautiful Ann Shankland arrives to see her alcoholic ex-husband, John Malcolm, who is secretly engaged to Pat Cooper, the woman who runs the hotel. Meanwhile, snobbish Mrs Railton-Bell discovers that the kindly if rather doddering Major Pollock is not what he appears to be. The news is particularly shocking for her frail daughter, Sibyl, who is secretly in love with the Major. Written by Shannon Patrick Sullivan <shannon@mun.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Once...Only Once in a Lifetime A Cast...A Story...A Motion Picture Like This! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When she was interviewed by the London "News Chronicle" about her Oscar win, Wendy Hiller said she thought the Academy was crazy for giving it to her. "All you could see of me in the picture was the back of my head. Unless they give some award for acting with one's back to the camera, I don't see how I could have won. They cut my two best scenes and gave one to Rita Hayworth." She went on, "Never mind the honor, though I'm sure it's very nice of them. I hope this award means cash - hard cash. I want lots of lovely offers to go filming in Hollywood, preferably in the winter so I can avoid all the horrid cold over here." See more »

Goofs

When John takes Ann in his arms on the terrace, she drops her cigarette. As they go back inside, she still has the cigarette in her hand. See more »

Quotes

Ann Shankland: If all I wanted to do was make my husband a slave, why would I have chosen you and not the others?
John Malcolm: Cause where would the fun have been? Where would the fun have been enslaving men like that? A tame millionaire? A mincing baronet? To well brought you to say anything when you denied them their conjugal rights! Too well mannered not to take you headaches at bedtime as *just* headaches at bedtime. Where would the fun have been turning your weapons on men like that?
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Alternate Versions

Delbert Mann did not want the song in the opening titles, and he discovered an old British print that included David Raksin's main title rather than the song, as he had wanted it, being used in a film festival. See more »


Soundtracks

Separate Tables
(1958)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Harold Adamson
Sung by Vic Damone (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
Do Check Into The Beauregard Hotel!
4 December 2007 | by ferbs54See all my reviews

"Separate Tables" (1958) is a movie that I'd been wanting to see for many years, and it was worth the wait. A "Grand Hotel"-type of story that takes place at a quaint English inn by the sea, it features any number of interesting characters, marvelously depicted by a host of great talents. Thus, we get a love triangle between Burt Lancaster, his ex-wife Rita Hayworth (40 years old in this film and still looking very pulchritudinous) and the charming hotel owner Wendy Hiller, who really did earn her Best Supporting Actress Oscar here. We meet the repressed mess of a spinster played by Deborah Kerr, as well as her impossibly overbearing mother (Gladys Cooper, doing here what she did to Bette Davis in 1942's "Now, Voyager"). We get to know retired Army major David Niven, and learn his dark secrets. (Niven, too, earned his Oscar for this fine portrayal; he also costarred with Kerr in another 1958 film, "Bonjour Tristesse.") And finally, we encounter a pair of young lovers, Rod Taylor and the yummy Audrey Dalton, who can't decide if they should marry or not. Many dramatic encounters abound (some of them sexually frank for 1958), and Hayworth's mature and adult performance might come as the pleasantest surprise of the bunch. Personally, I would say that big Burt picks the wrong gal to go off with at the film's conclusion, but I suppose that this is a matter of personal taste. The bottom line here is that this classic film is a wonderful treat for viewers who appreciate good screen writing and who relish deliciously served acting by a bunch of real pros. And this nice, crisp-looking DVD only adds to the pleasure. So do yourself a favor and check into the Beauregard Hotel!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

11 February 1959 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Separate Tables See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$7,400,000
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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