6.5/10
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32 user 18 critic

Kings Go Forth (1958)

Approved | | Action, Drama, Romance | 28 June 1958 (USA)
Toward the end of World War II, two American soldiers fighting in Southern France become romantically involved with a young, American woman. Her background will reveal more about them than her.

Director:

Delmer Daves

Writers:

Joe David Brown (novel), Merle Miller (screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Frank Sinatra ... 1st Lt. Sam Loggins
Tony Curtis ... Cpl. Britt Harris
Natalie Wood ... Monique Blair
Leora Dana ... Mrs. Blair
Karl Swenson ... The Colonel
Ann Codee ... Mme. Brieux
Eddie Ryder Eddie Ryder ... Cpl. Lindsay (as Edward Ryder)
Jacques Berthe Jacques Berthe ... Jean-François Dauvah, Boy
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Storyline

Race, love, and war. The Allies have landed in France, set up in a coastal town, where Lt. Sam Loggins, a serious guy from Manhattan's west side, falls hard for Monique Blair, an American raised in France. Loggins' sergeant, Britt Harris, a playboy from Jersey, also finds Monique attractive. She chooses one to love and the other to befriend after disclosing her parents' history and why she lives in France. The men say it makes no difference, a wedding is announced, and the soldiers face a dangerous mission behind enemy lines. But is everyone being truthful? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

FRANK SINATRA - TONY CURTIS - NATALIE WOOD In The Most Challenging Love Story Of Our Time See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Frank Sinatra, in this film, is 25 years older than Natalie Wood, who he romances, and 8 years older than Leora Dana, who plays her mother. See more »

Goofs

Soldiers advancing on a bunker with a bazooka are killed by enemy machine gunfire. When Cpl. Harris (Tony Curtis) runs out of the foxhole and picks up the bazooka to shoot into the bunker, one of the dead soldiers flinches at the sound of the bazooka's explosion. See more »

Quotes

1st Lt. Sam Loggins: How do you feel about riding in a jeep?
Mrs. Blair: It's one of the several experiences I promised myself before I die. Another is jumping out of a parachute.
1st Lt. Sam Loggins: No, dear. You jump out of a plane. You hold onto the parachute.
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Connections

Referenced in In Person (1993) See more »

User Reviews

 
What's Wrong With This Picture?
27 July 2005 | by Bob-45See all my reviews

When I saw the previews to "Kings Go Forth" in 1958, I was excited. This looked like an important picture with big stars (Frank Sinatra, Tony Curtis, Natalie Wood). That I already realized this at the age of 9 still strikes me as fairly remarkable. Later, I couldn't remember much about it after seeing it, except for its climactic battle scene. So, when it showed on Turner in 2005, I decided to watch it again. The interracial theme is certainly dated now, but this was strong stuff in 1958, particularly for someone from the South. After all, at that time southern department stores had separate restrooms for "White" and "Colored," and interracial marriage was ILLEGAL in southern states. However, the interracial theme is really not all that important to the story, as the themes of Sinatra's alienation, Wood's infatuation and Curtis' narcissism are probably elements familiar to MOST of us. Ever pine for a girl/guy friend who fell hard for someone else who was showier or better looking? I would, however, like to touch on what I believe is an unfair criticism of the film; i.e., that Natalie Wood is not convincing as someone of mixed race. Blonde, blue-eyed Cameron Diaz is Swedish and Cuban, and has said in interviews that her father's skin is black and that it is very likely her children would be.

I thought Natalie Wood and Tony Curtis were just great in this movie, as was Leora Dana as Natalie's mother. Wood never received her due as an actress and I thought her French accent was just fine. Curtis is absolutely chilling in his confrontation with Dana and Wood and it is easy to understand why Sinatra would want to kill Curtis. I think Sinatra is somewhat miscast as the "ugly duckling" who pines for Wood. After all, we've all seen too many movies where Sinatra's won the hearts of girls as pretty as Wood (if there ARE any other girls as pretty as Wood). Watching the film again, I couldn't help but wonder what Charles Bronson could have done with Sinatra's role. Nonetheless, given the potentially explosive (at that time) interracial element, it is unlikely "Kings Go Forth" would have been made without Sinatra's participation. Further, the episodic structure of "Kings Go Forth" plays against the sexual tension of a love triangle. Finally, the ending is almost annoyingly noncommittal. It shouldn't be; after all, there are enough clues as to what should eventually transpire between the principals. I think, here, the problem continues to be Sinatra. He is simply too aloof and passionless.

Given my criticisms, you may be surprised to know I really like "Kings Go Forth." I give it a "7". Oh, and for the record, the French ARE, historically, a VERY racially tolerant people. Witness "Cajuns," the French and Indian War, Josephene Baker and their acceptance of Indo-Chinese Eurasian children.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French | German

Release Date:

28 June 1958 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kings Go Forth See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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