6.5/10
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37 user 29 critic

Corridors of Blood (1958)

Not Rated | | Crime, Horror, Thriller | 12 May 1963 (USA)
Dr. Thomas Bolton fights for the use of anesthetic in surgery and uses himself as a guinea pig, but soon finds himself addicted.

Director:

Robert Day

Writer:

Jean Scott Rogers (screenplay)
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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Boris Karloff ... Dr. Bolton
Betta St. John ... Susan
Christopher Lee ... Resurrection Joe
Finlay Currie ... Supt. Matheson
Adrienne Corri ... Rachel
Francis De Wolff Francis De Wolff ... Black Ben
Francis Matthews ... Jonathan Bolton
Frank Pettingell ... Mr. Blount
Basil Dignam ... Chairman
Marian Spencer Marian Spencer ... Mrs Matheson
Carl Bernard Carl Bernard ... Ned, The Crow
John Gabriel John Gabriel ... Dispenser
Nigel Green ... Insp. Donovan
Yvonne Romain ... Rosa (as Yvonne Warren)
Howard Lang ... Chief Inspector
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Storyline

In an effort to relieve the suffering of surgery patients, Dr. Thomas Bolton painstakingly develops an opium-based anesthetic, to which he gradually becomes addicted. In order to provide a continual supply of chemicals to continue his experiments and support his addiction, he falls in with a den of murderers who use his signature to sell cadavers to the local hospital. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Tops in Terror!

Genres:

Crime | Horror | Thriller

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Boris Karloff (Dr. Thomas Bolton) and Sir Christopher Lee (Resurrection Joe) have four roles in common: (1) Karloff played Frankenstein's Monster in Frankenstein (1931), The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), and Son of Frankenstein (1939), while Lee played him in The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), (2) Karloff played the Mummy in The Mummy (1932), while Lee played him in The Mummy (1959), (3) Karloff played Dr. Fu Manchu in The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932), while Lee played him in The Face of Fu Manchu (1965), The Brides of Fu Manchu (1966), The Vengeance of Fu Manchu (1967), The Blood of Fu Manchu (1968), and Sax Rohmer's The Castle of Fu Manchu (1969), and (4) Karloff played Grigori Rasputin in Suspense: The Black Prophet (1953), while Lee played him in Rasputin: The Mad Monk (1966). See more »

Goofs

Although the opening credits set the movie in 1840, Dr Bolton uses a Bunsen Burner in his laboratory, not invented until 1854-5. See more »

Quotes

Hospital chairman: Mr. Bolton, the committee have decided against holding ant further demonstrations
Dr. Bolton: Well, Charles, you've lost faith with me too?
Hospital chairman: The decision's for your own good.
Dr. Bolton: You can't stop me. Operations without pain are possible, and I'll not rest until I've proved it to you!
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: LONDON 1840

Before the discovery of Anaesthesia See more »

Alternate Versions

The UK cinema version was cut by the BBFC to reduce shots of Rosa being caressed by Joe and to remove a brief shot of Joe's face scarred with acid. These edits were restored in video releases though the 2006 DD Entertainment DVD features the cut cinema print. In the U.S however the film was cut differently. The 'ravishing' of Rosa was left intact but 3 cuts were made to the stabbings of Bolton and the night watchman, and the surgical cutting of a patient's leg. The U.S Criterion DVD features the U.S cinema print though the cut scenes are presented as extra features on the disc. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Svengoolie: The Curse of the Werewolf (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Luverly Gin
(uncredited)
Music by Buxton Orr
Lyrics by Francis O'Grady
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User Reviews

Sawing Bones with Monkey on Your Back
23 September 2011 | by flapdoodle64See all my reviews

This finely-crafted minimalist film stars two of the most legendary horror stars of all time, yet it is without any supernatural elements. I suppose it is classified as horror because it is steeped in the creepy atmosphere of a 19th century operating theater and clinic for the poor, and because Christopher Lee plays a serial killer.

Into the final decade of his career and life, Boris Karloff gives a typically excellent performance of a good and compassionate man who defies the conventional wisdom of his time, such wisdom being the belief that since god intended humans to suffer to administer pain-killing drugs for surgery is to defy god's will.

The creepy, claustrophobic, impoverished world of this film is an appropriate setting for the business of a horror film, as well as a peak into the vast inequities between the upper and lower strata of society. Karloff is an upper-class doctor who once a week operates a free clinic for the poor.

While being thoroughly satisfying as a psychological horror film in its own right, this picture also provides a realistic portrayal of drug addiction and other issues of social relevancy.


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 May 1963 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Corredores de Sangue See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP90,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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