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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)

Not Rated | | Drama | 29 August 1958 (USA)
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2:17 | Trailer
Brick is an alcoholic ex-football player who drinks his days away and resists the affections of his wife. A reunion with his terminal father jogs a host of memories and revelations for both father and son.

Director:

Richard Brooks

Writers:

Richard Brooks (screenplay), James Poe (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
2,700 ( 1,567)
Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Elizabeth Taylor ... Maggie
Paul Newman ... Brick
Burl Ives ... Big Daddy
Jack Carson ... Gooper
Judith Anderson ... Big Mama
Madeleine Sherwood ... Mae
Larry Gates ... Dr. Baugh
Vaughn Taylor ... Deacon Davis
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Storyline

The family of "Big Daddy" Pollitt (Burl Ives) convenes at his and Big Momma's (Dame Judith Anderson's). Among the attendees is alcoholic son, Brick (Paul Newman); an ex-football player, who spends his time drinking and avoiding the ministries of his libidinous wife, Maggie (Dame Elizabeth Taylor) - "the cat". As this gathering isn't so much as a gathering but a farewell (Big Daddy is terminally ill) a lot of memories and revelations which had been hidden come to the surface of both father and son. Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

This is Maggie the Cat... See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the top ten box-office hits of 1958. See more »

Goofs

The way Brick holds his glass changes, while Maggie talks with him about Gooper's plan to grab the estate. See more »

Quotes

Gooper Pollitt: [to Maggie] Why don't you go up there and drink with Brick if the conquerin' hero hasn't passed out already? He may have to pass up the Sugar Bowl this year or was it the Rose Bowl he made his famous run in?
Mae Pollitt: It was the punch bowl, Honey, the cut-glass punch bowl.
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Connections

Version of Koshka na raskalyonnoy kryshe (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Fourth movement, Symphony No, 5 in C minor, Op. 67
(1808) (uncredited)
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
Played on a radio
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User Reviews

Wonderful Williams - Brilliant Ives
13 June 2004 | by jacksflicksSee all my reviews

Burl Ives gives the greatest portrayal of a literary character in film history, and he wasn't even recognized by an Oscar nomination, further evidence of the Academy's complete lack of credibility as an arbiter of screen excellence.

The casting is brilliant:

Tennessee Williams's Big Daddy was indeed big - larger than life, domineering, insensitive, self-absorbed. Burl Ives's Big Daddy is larger than life, insensitive, domineering, self-absorbed. Ives is "on" every moment. And every moment is true.

Paul Newman's Brick, is as afraid of life as Big Daddy is in love with it. Yet, in his way, he's a chip off the old block - self-absorbed, insensitive.

And domineering or, as Big Daddy and Maggie would have it, masterful, ready to take charge -

if he could just get over himself.

I confess, I don't care for Elizabeth Taylor as an actress, but she is so right for the part, that I can't think of anyone else to fill it. Anyway, who else has eyes that could compete with Newman's?

Judith Anderson plays the typical Williams matron, living in her house of delusions. She's Big Daddy's tormented, desperately lonely, unloved partner, who towards the end wins Big Daddy with her nobility and devotion.

The under-appreciated Jack Carter has the unenviable role of Brick's pliant, conformist brother, Gooper, decent at heart but worn out after years of jumping through Big Daddy's hoops and still winding up on the short end, with a house full of brats, bred at Big Daddy's presumed bidding and delivered by a scheming, ambitious weasel of a wife. Gooper the only character I have a little trouble with, because his climactic speech, as rendered by Carter, is so heartfelt, that we are aggrieved with him at the injustice of Big Daddy's favoritism for the no-account but aesthetically more pleasing Brick.

Perhaps an even more unenviable role is that of Gooper's wife, played to perfection by Madeleine Sherwood. Anyone who has grown up in the South has known "Sister Woman". I can assure those who haven't, that this character is not a stereotype or caricature.

There are a few quibbles. One character, the family doctor, though played well by Larry Gates, has a dramatic function that's about as useful as the referee in a pro wrestling match, but not nearly as decorative. I guess he's included to provide plot information, but I think it could have been provided just as well without him. I was also put off by the contrived thunder claps at dramatic moments. Then, there were some continuity problems, such as different facial expression when shot angles were changed and Gooper's too many "Shut ups" to Sister Woman.

If, as another reviewer has said, Tennessee Williams hated this film, then it couldn't have been because it was untrue to his work. If he disliked the changes and omissions, he should blame '50s prudishness, not the film, for dictating, say, the suppression of Brick's homosexuality.

Williams wrote about lies and delusions, the good ones and bad ones. Well, that's what Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Streetcar Named Desire and Glass Menagerie were all about. Tennessee Williams's stories about the South and its culture of delusion are not just rebukes of Southern hypocrisy and bloodymindedness but paeans to the gentle and genteel refuge which delusion provides. As Maggie "The Cat" says, "Truth, truth - everybody keeps hollerin' about the truth. Well, the truth is as dirty as lies."

Finally, I think it was brilliant of Richard Brooks to insist on color, for Williams's stuff is talky, and with the drabness of a typical Williams set, this can be a bit oppressive. With color, and the wonderful animation Brooks instills in all the characters, his Cat contains not a dull moment. If Brooks has given us something at odds with what Williams intended, I think he has given us something just as fine.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 August 1958 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Avon Productions (II) See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Perspecta Sound®) (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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