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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)

Not Rated | | Drama | 29 August 1958 (USA)
Brick Pollitt (Paul Newman), an alcoholic ex-football player, drinks his days away and resists the affections of his wife, Maggie (Dame Elizabeth Taylor). His reunion with his father, Big Daddy (Burl Ives), who is dying of cancer, jogs a host of memories and revelations for both father and son.

Director:

Richard Brooks

Writers:

Richard Brooks (screenplay), James Poe (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Elizabeth Taylor ... Maggie
Paul Newman ... Brick
Burl Ives ... Big Daddy
Jack Carson ... Gooper
Judith Anderson ... Big Mama
Madeleine Sherwood ... Mae
Larry Gates ... Dr. Baugh
Vaughn Taylor ... Deacon Davis
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Storyline

The family of "Big Daddy" Pollitt (Burl Ives) convenes at his and Big Momma's (Dame Judith Anderson's). Among the attendees is alcoholic son, Brick (Paul Newman); an ex-football player, who spends his time drinking and avoiding the ministries of his libidinous wife, Maggie (Dame Elizabeth Taylor) - "the cat". As this gathering isn't so much as a gathering but a farewell (Big Daddy is terminally ill) a lot of memories and revelations which had been hidden come to the surface of both father and son. Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Every sultry moment of Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize Play is now on the screen! See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although Elia Kazan directed "Cat" on Broadway, he was not involved in this movie, despite having two cinematic successes with Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and Baby Doll (1956). Kazan had had trouble with Williams, demanding that he re-write the third act of the play to bring "Big Daddy" Pollitt back on stage. He also was tired of having critics call him a "co-author" of Williams work, which he knew he was not. He eventually directed one more Williams play on Broadway, Sweet Bird of Youth (1962), but that movie was also directed by Richard Brooks. See more »

Goofs

After Doctor Baugh tells Brick the truth about Big Daddy, he leaves the scene from the balcony. However, near the last shot of the scene, you can see a shadow of a person walking behind on the balcony long after Doctor Baugh left the scene. See more »

Quotes

Harvey 'Big Daddy' Pollitt: I'm gonna pick me a choice woman and I'm gonna smother her in minks and choke her with diamonds. Boy, I'm gonna be happy.
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Connections

Referenced in The Greatest American Hero: The Hit Car (1981) See more »

Soundtracks

For He's a Jolly Good Fellow
(uncredited)
Traditional
Sung by the family
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User Reviews

 
A powerful Burl Ives livens up a simple story
19 December 2009 | by hall895See all my reviews

The best thing Cat on a Hot Tin Roof has going for it is one truly remarkable acting performance. And that performance comes from neither Elizabeth Taylor nor Paul Newman. There's nothing wrong with the work turned in by Taylor and Newman, they are both perfectly fine in their roles. And it is their characters who are the focus for most of the film. But late on in the proceedings Burl Ives grabs hold of the film and makes it his own. Ives turns in a performance which is so strong and powerful that it threatens to overshadow and overwhelm everything else in the film. However it is rather difficult to overshadow Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman. And the film's rather simple story is certainly compelling enough so as not to be overwhelmed by the Ives tour de force near the end. So while Ives may end up being the most memorable thing the film has to offer he is certainly not the only memorable thing. His great performance is merely the best part of what is an overall thoroughly satisfying film.

The film's simple story centers around a day in the life of a wealthy Southern family. With this family the key word is "mendacity". What does that even mean? Any of our characters who initially don't know about mendacity surely will by the time the story plays itself out. As we meet them everyone has come together to celebrate the 65th birthday of family patriarch Big Daddy. Initially it seems the film is about Big Daddy's son Brick and his wife Maggie the Cat. Brick and Maggie are not currently in the throes of wedded bliss. To say their relationship is strained would be putting it mildly. The fact that alcohol seems to be the only thing in life Brick is at all interested in probably does not help matters. But as the film progresses we see there is a larger issue than Brick and Maggie's troubled marriage. Big Daddy is dying. And nobody, not his family and not his doctors, has the guts to tell him. This will ultimately play itself out in powerful, heartrending fashion.

For much of the film's running time you would call it compelling but certainly not spectacular. But then Ives, as Big Daddy, grabs the film by its throat and shakes some real life into it. There's a scene where Ives as Big Daddy and Newman as Brick are alone in a basement which simply could not have been performed any better. There's so much these characters have to say to one another. The emotion is raw and the scene is so powerful. It hits you right in the heart. Just this one scene alone, with these two great actors, elevates the film all by itself. Newman is terrific. Ives is astounding. Perhaps it is in fact possible to overshadow Elizabeth Taylor. Maybe just this once. Maggie the Cat is an intriguing character in her own right and Taylor certainly doesn't disappoint in the role. But it turns out that ultimately the film is really about the relationship between Brick and his father, not Brick and his wife. And as such it is Newman, and most especially Ives, who you will most remember. It is their work which transforms a good movie into something truly memorable.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 August 1958 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Avon Productions (II) See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Perspecta Sound®) (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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