The Buccaneer (1958) - News Poster

(1958)

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50 More of the Greatest Matte Paintings of All Time

A few years ago the editors of Shadowlocked asked me to compile a list of what was initially to be, the ten greatest movie matte paintings of all time. A mere ten selections was too slim by a long shot, so my list stretched considerably to twenty, then thirty and finally a nice round fifty entries. Even with that number I found it wasn’t easy to narrow down a suitably wide ranging showcase of motion picture matte art that best represented the artform. So with that in mind, and due to the surprising popularity of that 2012 Shadowlocked list (which is well worth a visit, here Ed), I’ve assembled a further fifty wonderful examples of this vast, vital and more extensively utilised than you’d imagine – though now sadly ‘dead and buried’ – movie magic.

It would of course be so easy to simply concentrate on the well known, iconic,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: First 'Pirates of the Caribbean' One of Most Enjoyable Summer Blockbusters of Early 21st Century

'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl': Johnny Depp as Capt. Jack Sparrow. 'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl' review: Mostly an enjoyable romp (Oscar Movie Series) Pirate movies were a Hollywood staple for about three decades, from the mid-'20s (The Sea Hawk, The Black Pirate) to the mid-to-late '50s (Moonfleet, The Buccaneer), when the genre, by then mostly relegated to B films, began to die down. Sporadic resurrections in the '80s and '90s turned out to be critical and commercial bombs (Pirates, Cutthroat Island), something that didn't bode well for the Walt Disney Company's $140 million-budgeted film "adaptation" of one of their theme-park rides. But Neptune's mood has apparently improved with the arrival of the new century. He smiled – grinned would be a more appropriate word – on the Gore Verbinski-directed Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

​'Gaslight': 7 Everlasting Legacies of the Ingrid Bergman Classic

1. The term "gaslight." The Ingrid Bergman thriller "Gaslight" -- released 70 years ago this week, on May 4, 1944, wasn't the original use of the title. There was Patrick Hamilton's 1938 play "Gas Light," retitled "Angel Street" when it came to Broadway a couple years later. And there was a British film version in 1939, starring Anton Walbrook (later the cruel impresario in "The Red Shoes") and Diana Wynyard.

Still, the glossy 1944 MGM version remains the best-known telling of the tale, with the title an apparent reference to the flickering Victorian lamps that are part of Gregory's (Charles Boyer) scheme to make wife Paula (Bergman) think she's seeing things that aren't there, thus deliberately undermining her sanity in order to have her institutionalized so that he'll be free to ransack the ancestral home to find the missing family jewels.

This version of Hamilton's tale was so popular that it made the word "gaslight"into a verb,
See full article at Moviefone »

A Brief History of the President of the United States, Action-Movie Hero

  • Vulture
A Brief History of the President of the United States, Action-Movie Hero
There are a lot of reasons why White House Down achieves new levels of ridiculousness, but Jamie Foxx’s wisecracking, gun-wielding president is not one of them. That’s because the idea of an action-movie president has, over the years, slowly become a kind of accepted concept in our blockbuster movies. The idea goes further back than you think:The President’s Lady (1952)Charlton Heston as Andrew JacksonAs Jackson, Heston has to contend with romantic rivals, Indians, insolent gossips, and the British, in a story that covers the love affair between the future president and his beloved wife, Rachel Donelson Robards, who was married to another man when they met. It is never not awesome to watch a future president of the United States kick the crap out of a guy for the sake of a woman. The Buccaneer (1958)Charlton Heston as Andrew Jackson, again “Let me make this very clear,
See full article at Vulture »

Why Do We Make Presidents Into Action Heroes?

You'd think being president of the United States would be a dramatic enough occupation, but no. Being leader of the free world is isn't exactly a low-stakes assignment, but in the dream-life of our movies, we also need our presidents to be two-fisted action heroes. Exhibit A: This weekend's "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter," which imagines the Railsplitter splitting open the heads of undead bloodsuckers with an ax. Its star, Benjamin Walker, has already made a career out of playing bare-knuckled presidents, starting with his lead role in the Broadway rock musical "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson." In his comedy act, he's joked that he's been offered such projects as an erotic thriller inspired by the adulterous Warren G. Harding and "James Buchanan: Mars Patrol." If that's not enough, coming up this September is "Fdr: American Badass!" The low-budget, tongue-in-cheek feature stars Barry Bostwick as the wartime leader, who, despite his polio,
See full article at Moviefone »

This Week on DVD and Blu-ray: Hugo, Johnny English Reborn, Miss Bala

It's kind of a slow week for DVD and Blu-ray releases in the wake of the Oscars, with only one Oscar nominee taking advantage of the extra promotional boost: Martin Scorsese's Hugo. If you missed it in theatres, now is the time to catch up... especially if you happen to own a 3D TV. The only other major release is the absolute anti-thesis of an Academy Award-worthy film, Johnny English Reborn. Fortunately, there are a few interesting foreign and indie releases in stores today including the Mexican thriller Miss Bala, Chilean action flick Mandrill, I Melt with You starring Rob Lowe and Thomas Jane, and The Catechism Cataclysm starring Eastbound & Down's Steve Little. There is also a new animated Warner Brothers direct-to-dvd feature Justice League: Doom and for the first time ever(?) on DVD, Cecil B. DeMille's The Buccaneer. Will you be buying or renting anything this week?
See full article at FilmJunk »

The Untouchables Star Gordon Dies

  • WENN
The Untouchables Star Gordon Dies
American actor Bruce Gordon has passed away just days after the death of his The Untouchables co-star Paul Picerni.

The 94 year old, who lived in Santa Fe, New Mexico, died last Thursday after a long illness, according to Santa Fe Funeral Options, a local funeral home.

The news comes just a week after his TV colleague Picerni suffered a fatal heart attack at his home in Llano, California.

Gordon made his Broadway debut in 1937, playing several small roles in The Fireman's Flame. His other Broadway credits include Arsenic and Old Lace, Medea, Richard II, The Lark and Nowhere to Go But Up.

His television career kicked off in the 1940s, with guest appearances on several U.S. series, including I Spy, Have Gun - Will Travel, Gunsmoke, Perry Mason, Bonanza and Police Woman, among others.

In the late 1950s, he was the host of espionage docudrama Behind Closed Doors, and in the 1960s he enjoyed a recurring role on Peyton Place.

But Gordon will perhaps be best remembered for his role as mob boss Frank Nitti on classic 1960s U.S. TV series The Untouchables.

His feature film credits include Love Happy (1949), The Buccaneer (1958) and Tower of London (1962).

Information on Gordon's survivors was not made available as WENN went to press.

Interview: Claire Bloom On A Great Career Spanning Chaplin Thru Firth

Yesterday, I had the opportunity so speak for about 30 minutes over the phone with the legendary British stage and screen actress Claire Bloom, one of the great talents and beauties of the past century. Bloom, who made her film debut 63 years ago and has co-starred with countless greats — among them Charlie Chaplin, Laurence Olivier, Richard Burton, John Gielgud, Rod Steiger, and Paul Newman — is still going strong at the age of 79. Most recently, she gave a brief but memorable performance as Queen Mary, the mother of King Edward Xiii (Guy Pearce) and King George VI (Colin Firth), in “The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company, 11/24, R, trailer), which the Screen Actors Guild rewarded with a best ensemble nomination.

Click Here To Listen To Audio Of Our Conversation!

Over the course of our conversation, Bloom and I discussed…

her early theater- and movie-going experiences/acting inspirations (her mother loved Shakespeare and
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

What's New on Netflix, VOD and Redbox: 'The Town,' 'Salt,' 'Dogfight'

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Features, DVDs

Helping you navigate the sea of available on-demand movie and television content, What's New will help you settle that age-old argument of what to watch. Covering Netflix Watch Instantly, Redbox, and Cable Video-on-Demand services, this weekly Moviefone column does the grunt work so you don't have to. Movie night has officially been simplified.

Netflix Watch Instantly

(Accessed through your Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, personal computer, or Roku box)

Action/Adventure:

'The Buccaneer' -- Cecil B. DeMille's 'The Buccaneer' stars Fredric March, complete with curly hair, pencil mustache and florid "Sacre Bleu!" French accent, as 18th century pirate Jean Lafitte. Play on Netflix.

'Hong Kong' -- This thriller, set in Asia, follows the exciting exploits of a villainous soldier of fortune (Ronald Reagan) who gets involved in shady shenanigans with the communists, getting caught red-handed by the authorities. Play on Netflix.
See full article at Moviefone »

The 'Other' Lone Ranger Dies

  • WENN
The 'Other' Lone Ranger Dies
John Hart, the man who replaced Clayton Moore as TV's wild west hero The Lone Ranger, has died, aged 91.

Hart battled dementia in his latter years and passed away at his home in Rosarito Beach, Mexico on Sunday, according to the Los Angeles Times.

A California native, Hart launched his Hollywood career in Cecil B. DeMille’s 1938 film The Buccaneer.

After serving in the U.S. Army, he landed the title role in the 1947 TV series Jack Armstrong: The All-American Boy and took over from Moore as The Lone Ranger for 52 episodes of the popular family show.

He was the perfect choice for the role - because he worked as a cowboy as a teenager, and had joined the cast of the show to work with a nervous Silver, the Lone Ranger's horse.

Hart gave up the role of The Lone Ranger when Moore returned to the show, but he played the masked hero again in a 1981 episode of The Greatest American Hero and in a 1982 episode of Happy Days.

He also starred in Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans, alongside horror movie icon Lon Chaney Jr.

Composer Elmer Bernstein Dies at 82

Composer Elmer Bernstein Dies at 82
Elmer Bernstein, the amazingly prolific composer who wrote the memorable theme for The Magnificent Seven among other scores, died Wednesday in his sleep at his home in Ojai, California; he was 82. The recipient of 14 Oscar nominations (winning one for his score for 1967's Thoroughly Modern Millie), Bernstein wrote music for a number of classic movies that shaped the landscape of film in the last half of the 20th century. His scores ranged from the epic to the intimate, from classically austere to energetically jazzy, and were the accompaniment to a number of immortal films of the 50s and 60s. A protégé of Aaron Copland, Bernstein worked on B-films like Robot Monster before gaining fame with his jazz-influenced score (a Hollywood first) to 1955's The Man With the Golden Arm, for which he received his first Oscar nomination. A year later, his score for Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments also established his presence in Hollywood, and was quickly followed by scores for Sweet Smell of Success, Some Came Running, The Buccanner, and the TV series Gunsmoke, among others. Bernstein's most famous score came with the 1960 western The Magnificent Seven; its boisterous, rousing theme became of the most memorable pieces of movie music, and was endlessly featured (and imitated) in a number of movies to come; it was also utilized in a series of Marlboro commercials.

Bernstein worked tirelessly through the 60s and 70s, composing four to five scores a year for films as disparate as the Southern coming-of-age drama To Kill a Mockingbird, the sweeping epic Hawaii, the western The Hallelujah Trail, the jailhouse drama Birdman of Alcatraz and the 20s flapper musical Thoroughly Modern Millie. The 70s and 80s saw Bernstein compose more for television as well as film, and he also began composing more for comedy films, scoring Animal House, Airplane! , The Blues Brothers and Ghostbusters. In 1991, he worked with Martin Scorsese on Cape Fear, adapting and arranging Bernard Herrmann's score for the original 1961 film, and composed scores for Scorsese's The Age of Innocence and Bringing Out the Dead. Later films included The Rainmaker, Twilight, My Left Foot, The Grifters, and Devil in a Blue Dress. In 2002, Bernstein received his fourteenth Oscar nomination for the soaring, melancholy score for Far From Heaven. Bernstein is survived by his wife, Eve, as well as two daughters, two sons, and five grandchildren. --Prepared by IMDb staff

Composer Elmer Bernstein Dies at 82

Composer Elmer Bernstein Dies at 82
Elmer Bernstein, the amazingly prolific composer who wrote the memorable theme for The Magnificent Seven among other scores, died Wednesday in his sleep at his home in Ojai, California; he was 82. The recipient of 14 Oscar nominations (winning one for his score for 1967's Thoroughly Modern Millie), Bernstein wrote music for a number of classic movies that shaped the landscape of film in the last half of the 20th century. His scores ranged from the epic to the intimate, from classically austere to energetically jazzy, and were the accompaniment to a number of immortal films of the 50s and 60s. A protégé of Aaron Copland, Bernstein worked on B-films like Robot Monster before gaining fame with his jazz-influenced score (a Hollywood first) to 1955's The Man With the Golden Arm, for which he received his first Oscar nomination. A year later, his score for Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments also established his presence in Hollywood, and was quickly followed by scores for Sweet Smell of Success, Some Came Running, The Buccanner, and the TV series Gunsmoke, among others. Bernstein's most famous score came with the 1960 western The Magnificent Seven; its boisterous, rousing theme became of the most memorable pieces of movie music, and was endlessly featured (and imitated) in a number of movies to come; it was also utilized in a series of Marlboro commercials.

Bernstein worked tirelessly through the 60s and 70s, composing four to five scores a year for films as disparate as the Southern coming-of-age drama To Kill a Mockingbird, the sweeping epic Hawaii, the western The Hallelujah Trail, the jailhouse drama Birdman of Alcatraz and the 20s flapper musical Thoroughly Modern Millie. The 70s and 80s saw Bernstein compose more for television as well as film, and he also began composing more for comedy films, scoring Animal House, Airplane! , The Blues Brothers and Ghostbusters. In 1991, he worked with Martin Scorsese on Cape Fear, adapting and arranging Bernard Herrmann's score for the original 1961 film, and composed scores for Scorsese's The Age of Innocence and Bringing Out the Dead. Later films included The Rainmaker, Twilight, My Left Foot, The Grifters, and Devil in a Blue Dress. In 2002, Bernstein received his fourteenth Oscar nomination for the soaring, melancholy score for Far From Heaven. Bernstein is survived by his wife, Eve, as well as two daughters, two sons, and five grandchildren. --Prepared by IMDb staff

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