5.7/10
1,754
29 user 12 critic

The Barbarian and the Geisha (1958)

In 1856, the first U.S. Consul General to Japan encounters the hostility of the local authorities and the love of a young geisha.

Director:

John Huston

Writers:

Charles Grayson (screenplay), Ellis St. Joseph (story)
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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
John Wayne ... Townsend Harris
Eiko Ando ... Okichi
Sam Jaffe ... Henry Heusken
Sô Yamamura ... Governor Tamura
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Storyline

Townsend Harris is sent by President Pierce to Japan to serve as the first U.S. Consul-General to that country. Harris discovers enormous hostility to foreigners, as well as the love of a young geisha. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The geisha girl they sent to love and to destroy the barbarian from the west! See more »


Certificate:

TV-G | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Huston later dismissed this film, claiming that the final version, re-cut by the studio, didn't resemble his vision at all and that he would've liked to have his name removed from the credits. Stylistically, Huston wanted to make it a particularly Japanese film in terms of photography, pacing, color and narration. According to him, only bits of this attempt were still intact and visible in the theatrical version. See more »

Goofs

When Harris is before a panel of Japanese leaders to convince them to vote to accept the treaty, he is asked by one if the U.S. imports Africans for slavery. He answers regrettably yes and goes on to say many are trying to end slavery. The story took place around 1858, fifty years after The Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves of 1807 took effect in 1808. See more »

Quotes

Henry Heusken: You're in good hands now.
Townsend Harris: Yes, indeed.
Okichi: Also, "yes, indeed"?
Townsend Harris: Yes, indeed!
See more »

Connections

Featured in Cleopatra: The Film That Changed Hollywood (2001) See more »

User Reviews

 
Interesting, if not entirely successful
27 February 2011 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

The Barbarian and the Geisha was an interesting film. It isn't entirely successful, but I can say that both star John Wayne and director John Huston have done much worse.

The Barbarian and the Geisha does have its problems. The story is occasionally a little melodramatic, with the interracial love story not developed as well as it could have been, while the film could have done at a much tighter pace. The script also has its good points, but also some stilted and overly pompous moments too, while John Wayne is a little out-of-place and awkward in the lead. However, the film is spectacularly photographed, has a good score and has a very interesting subject matter that is presented well. The film is well-directed by Huston and Eiko Ando is beguiling and charming.

Overall, a decent film, could have been better but it wasn't as bad as I was led to believe. 6/10 Bethany Cox


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Japanese

Release Date:

30 September 1958 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Barbarian See more »

Filming Locations:

Kyoto, Japan See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,500,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Color by Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
See full technical specs »

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