5.8/10
119
9 user 1 critic

Six-Five Special (1958)

A young singer on a train bound for London finds herself among a group of famous musicians and performers.

Director:

Alfred Shaughnessy

Writer:

Norman Hudis (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lonnie Donegan Lonnie Donegan ... Self
Dickie Valentine Dickie Valentine ... Self
Jim Dale ... Self
Petula Clark ... Self
Russ Hamilton Russ Hamilton ... Self
Joan Regan ... Self
The King Brothers The King Brothers ... Themselves (as The King Bros.)
Jackie Dennis Jackie Dennis ... Self
John Dankworth John Dankworth ... Self (as Johnny Dankworth)
Cleo Laine Cleo Laine ... Self
Don Lang Don Lang ... Self
The John Barry Seven The John Barry Seven ... Themselves
The Ken-Tones The Ken-Tones ... Themselves
Desmond Lane Desmond Lane ... Self
Bernie Winters Bernie Winters ... Self (as Mike & Bernie Winters)
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Storyline

At the suggestion of her girlfriend, a young singer decides to try and make her name in London. Catching the overnight '6.5 Special' bound for the BBC television show, the two find the train full of 1950's British pop stars only too ready to burst into song. As the presenters of the show are also on board, our heroine is assured of a spot on the following Saturday's 'Six Five Special'. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

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Genres:

Musical

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Finlay Currie receives a "guest star" credit. See more »

Goofs

On the train heading to London Johnny Dankworth and his band are playing in the guards van and a few people start dancing including Ann (Diane Todd). At the end of the number she suddenly has a clutch type handbag in her hand. See more »

Quotes

Finlay Currie: Nerves; a good actor lives with them, a bad actor lives on them
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Connections

Spun-off from Six-Five Special (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

You Are My Favourite Dream
Written by Alfred Shaughnessy
Performed by Diane Todd
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User Reviews

 
I recall the artists but not the programme
26 April 2016 | by malcolmgswSee all my reviews

This is a really interesting time piece,since it reflects the changing tastes in music that took place during the 1950s.Early in the fifties,crooners such as Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra still held sway.One of our British crooners,and one of my personal favourites of the time,Dickie Valentine,is shown in full voice here.Then there was a slight change evidenced by such as Lonnie Donnegan.I still have his 45 disc of "My old mans a dustman.However the era of rock and roll was fast approaching with Rock Around The Clock and of course Elvis Presley.So the cosy world shown here was soon to be swept away.I also remember Pete Murray very well as he used to sit in the same area as me at The Arsenal.This film is for enthusiasts of the era primarily.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

March 1958 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Calling All Cats See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Insignia Films See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (re-release)

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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