To save his career, a writer for television advertising wants a famous actress to endorse a lipstick. In return, he has to pretend to be her new lover.

Director:

Frank Tashlin

Writers:

Frank Tashlin (screen story and screenplay), George Axelrod (play)
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Tony Randall ... Rockwell P. Hunter
Jayne Mansfield ... Rita Marlowe
Betsy Drake ... Jenny Wells
Joan Blondell ... Violet
John Williams ... Irving La Salle Jr.
Henry Jones ... Henry Rufus
Lili Gentle ... April Hunter
Mickey Hargitay ... Bobo Branigansky
Georgia Carr Georgia Carr ... Calypso Number
Dick Whittinghill ... T.V. Interviewer
Ann McCrea Ann McCrea ... Gladys
Alberto Morin ... Frenchman
Louis Mercier Louis Mercier ... Frenchman
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Storyline

In this spoof of the TV advertising industry, Rockwell Hunter is the low man on the totem pole at the advertising company where he works. That is, until he finds the perfect spokes model for Stay-Put lipstick, the famous actress with the oh-so-kissable lips, Rita Marlowe. Unfortunately, in exchange, Rock has to act publicly as Rita's "Loverdoll", and Rock's fiancée Jenny isn't too happy about it either. Written by Syam Gadde <gadde@cs.duke.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Jayne throws you a curve when you ask the leading question! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mamie Van Doren turned down the role of Rita Marlowe because it was a spoof on Marilyn Monroe and Van Doren was continuously getting compared to her. See more »

Goofs

The airplane window behind Jayne Mansfield's bed is large and square shaped, but when the plane is shown landing, all the windows on it are small and round. See more »

Quotes

Violet: [Both talking about trying to get over the men they love] Then I went to a psychiatrist.
Rita Marlowe: I was gonna to do that, too, except in Hollywood they're so busy with producers you can't even get an appointment.
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Crazy Credits

Tony Randall plays the 20th Century Fox fanfare when the logo appears, saying it was in his contract to do so. He then introduces the film, but forgets the title and tries to remember it. Finally, his three female co-stars appear to announce the film's correct title. See more »

Connections

References Peyton Place (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

You Got It Made
by Bobby Troup
Performed by Georgia Carr (uncredited)
Also sung by an off-screen vocal group
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User Reviews

A Loopy Delight
4 July 2001 | by fowler1See all my reviews

For a guy who scaled the twin peaks of animation and feature films - a rare accomplishment in the 1950s - director/gagman Frank Tashlin has, surprisingly, few real standouts on his resume. Too often ill-served by either his material, his stars, or both at once, Tashlin's reputation rests on his cartoons (of course) and flashes of brilliance in otherwise so-so live-action movies. After all, in most civilized nations, being the director of both CINDERFELLA and THE PRIVATE NAVY OF SGT O'FARRELL constitutes a demerit if not an outright crime against humanity. Even Tashlin's better pictures, like SON OF PALEFACE and THE GIRL CAN'T HELP IT, tend to be mediocrities occasionally enlivened by his outlandish visual slapstick. WILL SUCCESS SPOIL ROCK HUNTER? is the glorious summit of what had to have been a frustrating career, the one time he was matched with a writer (Geo Axelrod) and cast (led by Tony Randall & Jayne Mansfield) perfectly in sync with his playfully outre satiric sensibility. The end result will make you wish lightning had struck more often like this for Tashlin; ROCK HUNTER may be the most beautifully 'opened-up' stage property in film history. It's visually clever and sumptuous, engagingly witty and breathlessly paced all at the same time. Best of all, its satiric barbs (aimed at both television and the gray-flanneled Organization Man) hit their targets consistently while never superceding the character-driven heart of the story: Randall is simply terrific here, and his wobbly tightwalk between schnook and lothario is hilarious. Add a few bonus points for the casting of the severely-underappreciated Henry Jones as Randall's fellow ad-exec, who oozes authentic 50s smuttiness and desperation from his pores in every scene he steals. Jayne's at her very best to boot, doing her trademark sex-kitten squeal with one arched, knowing eyebrow, and displaying plenty of resourceful smarts in her wised-up line readings throughout. As satisfying a comedy as emerged from the American 50s. Make sure you see the widescreen version, though: you won't want to miss a thing here. Tashlin's masterpiece, and his penance for Jerry Lewis and Phyllis Diller.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

August 1957 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(FMC Library Print)

Sound Mix:

Mono | 4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Color by Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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